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Full text of "Three years with the Adirondack regiment : 118th New York volunteers infantry"

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1757969 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 00823 5225 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 



http://archive.org/details/threeyearswithadOOcunn 



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REE YEARS 



WITH THE 

DIRONDACK REGIMENT 



llffrw. NTCW XPKK VOLUNTEERS INFANTRY 



FROM THE DIARIES AND OTHER MEMORANDA 

OF 

JOHN L. CUNNINGHAM 



MAJOR- 118TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS INFANTRY 
BREVET LIEUTENANT COLONEL UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



FOB PRIVATE CIRCULATION 

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Cunningham, John Lovell, 1840- 

r- P »r Three years with the Adirondack regiment, USth New 

York volunteers infantry, from the diaries and other 
memoranda of John L. Cunningham, major 118th New 
York volunteers infantry, brevet lieutenant colonel 
United States volunteers. [Norwood, Mass., The Plimp- 
ton prcssj 1920. 

v p., 1 I., 2S6 p. front., plates, ports. 21*". 

For private circulation. 

"Individual service roster": p. 213-286. 

I. U. S.— Hist.— Civil war— Regimental histories— N. Y. inf.— 118th. 2. 
New York infantry. USth regt., 1862-1S65. I. Title, u. Title: Adiron- 
dack regiment 



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COPYRIGHT, I92O 
BY JOHN L. CUNNINGHAM 



THE nillPTOX PKESS • NORWOOD • MASS • C • S • A 






EXCUSATORY . 

WHEN I have looked over my diaries and other memo- 
randa of my soldiering-days for some desired data, I 
have thought it might be worth while to write out some of the 
matter connectedly. Friends have urged me to do it. 

My son was naturally interested in his father's occasional rela- 
tion of war experiences and almost persuaded me to undertake 
a story of them for his sake; but his lamented death in 1893 
chilled the purpose which he had warmed. 

Later promptings and more leisure have " encouraged hesi- 
tancy" and promoted thinking that some of these long-ago 
jottings might have a present interest for some and perhaps 
become interesting to others later on; for age ripens green tilings — 
if it does not make them rotten. 

As no history of the Adirondack Regiment has been written, 
the story of one of that militant organization would, in a general 
way, somewhat cover the experience of most of its members and, 
likely, concern its few survivors and some of the posterity of 
those who served with it. 

I have presumed to mention personal incidents of before and 
after the war, yet somewhat related, and also some of the items — 
neither sanguinary nor serious — which I had the habit of noting. 

I would gladly have illustrated with more portraits if photo- 
graphs could have been secured. 

yS ith no thought of literary merit, or of contributing anything 
new or valuable to the aggregate voluminous history of the War 
tor the Union, I am trusting to the generous consideration of 
friends; for only such have I had in mind in writing out the 
following talk — and only for private circulation. 




Glens Falls, New York 

April 5, 1020 

(My 80th Birthday) 



v 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Field and Staff, USth Regiment, New York Volunteers . . Frontispiece 

Facing 
page 

Colonel Samuel T. Richards 

Colonel Oliver Keese, Jr 14 

Colonel George F. Nichols 

Major John L. Cunningham 20 

Major Charles E. Pruyn ■ . . . . 4S 

Lieutenant and Adjutant John L. Carter 

Chaplain Charles L. Hagar 60 

Surgeon John H. Moores .'.... 

Assistant Surgeon James G. Porteous 76 

Lieutenant and Quartermaster Patrick K. DeLaney 

Private Warren Monty (showing field service uniform) .... 90 

Captain John Bryden 

Jeweled staff badge . . 9S 

Color Guard, 118th New York Volunteers Infantry 110 

Captain Robert W. Livingston 

Captain Edward Riggs 120 

Captain Josiah H. Norris 

Captain Jacob Parmerter 130 

Grant under fire at Fort Harrison 152 

Captain John S. Stone . 

Captain Charles W. Wells - 160 

Captain Dennis Stone 

Captain Henry J. Adams 172 

Captain David F. Dobie . 

Lieutenant Rowland C. Kellogg ISO 

Lieutenant William II. Stevenson 

Lieutenant Sam Sherman 202 

Lieutenant James S. Garrett 

Lieutenant Edgar M. Wing 210 



THREE YEARS WITH 
THE ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 

IN the early months of I860 the coming presidential election 
with its disturbing significance was an absorbing topic. Be- 
fore the national conventions there was heated discussion and 
speculation as to candidates. 

The Republicans of New York, the growth of that party promis- 
ing a chance of winning out, were happj' in their confidence that 
William H. Seward would be nominated. He was a "favorite 
son" and prominent in national affairs, so when the almost 
unknown Abraham Lincoln was nominated it was a painful 
disappointment. 

Hon. R. M. Little of Glens Falls, who was a delegate to the 
convention, said that "the defeat of Mr. Seward brought tears 
to my eyes and a real grief to my heart." 

Mr. Lincoln was little known in the East, and what little 
was known indicated such lack of education and experience as 
seemed unfitness for meeting the serious conditions which were 
sure to confront our next President. Many Republicans regarded 
his nomination as a calamity ■ — Democrats were sure of it. 

In a boy sort of way I shared in this feeling and kept compar- 
ing the little I knew of this "backwoods man" with what t thought 
I knew of Mr. Seward, about whom I had read much and whom I 
greatly admired. I was somewhat confirmed in this feeling when 
I first saw a cheap newspaper portrait of Mr. Lincoln and "sized 
it up" with the fine intellectual features of Mr. Seward's portrait. 

Not until I read the famous' Lincoln-Douglas debates and 
knew more of Mr. Lincoln's life, did 1 begin to comprehend the 
ability and worth of this son of poverty and conqueror of adversity. 

His manly conduct during the presidential campaign in spite 
of the contemptibly cru^l criticisms and aspersions of the "other 
side" and his wise conciliatory utterances influenced a growing 
rr-gard which, with me, reached "high tide' 7 before election — but 
I was not old enough to vote. 

I had been reading law for about a year, when in September, 
I860, I entered the Albany Law School; and living in the capitol 
city of the slate during those stirring and exciting days proved 

1 



2 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

of considerable additional value to the instruction of the school 
itself, much as I valued the teaching. 

Albany was a center of events; and with its courts and legislature, 
its political and other gatherings, there was such a "continuous 
performance" of notable men and things during that notable 
period as to gratify ray country-boy curiosity for hearing, seeing 
and pondering, and it proved a valuable side-education. 

The school had an able faculty, and there was more than the 
influence of teaching in such men as Judge Amasa J. Parker, 
Judge Ira Harris (afterwards U. S. senator), and that fatherly 
professor, Amos Dean. It was my good fortune to have more 
than an average pupil's acquaintance with all these professors. 
They were good to me in their encouraging personal touch and 
consideration and often expressed interest. 

While there I was employed to search the State Library in 
behalf of a patent case of some importance, involving going 
through voluminous patent-office reports, tracing drawings and 
looking up decisions in any way touching the case. I was finally 
authorized to secure the opinion of Judge Harris; I spent 
several evenings with him at his, home library and our conversa- 
tion was not exclusively about the infringing features of the patent 
case. One evening I had dinner with him and his family. 

I was invited tu Professor Dean's home several times and be- 
came interested in his ambitious undertaking of a " History of 
Civilization" (I believe that was the subject) for which he already 
had a trunk full of manuscript, the result of much study, research 
and labor and, it seemed to me, without much promise of reward 
beyond the probable pleasure he had in his work. 

Professor Dean always pronounced the last syllable of Arkansas 
as it is spelled and with emphasis. In lectures his reference to 
court reports of that state with this pronunciation, was sure to 
be applauded for his "grit." A student once, when Dean men- 
tioned this state, facetiously called out: "Professor, in what 
country is Arkan-sa.s^ " It produced the expected merriment 
and Professor Dean replied: "It is one of the United States at 
present and I hope it will remain so." This, in view of the then 
secession agitation had such a strong Union flavor as to bring 
genuine applause. 

Dear Professor Dean! He was large of body and large of heart, 
loving his "boys," as he called them, and those in whom he was 
specially interested were fortunate. He was genial, sympathetic 
and sincere — his friendship was worth while. I continued a 
desultory correspondence with him as long as he lived. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 3 

Judge Parker was every way and always a gentleman, and much 
respected. I gratefully remember his several kindnesses and 
favors. 

One of the big Albany events of that autumn was the arrival 
of the Prince of Wales and his suite of English dignitaries. They 
came up the Hudson from New York by a chartered steamer, 
arriving about four p.m. of a pleasant day. Against his arrival 
Steamboat Square was kept closed by militia formed on three 
sides. A multitude was packed outside the military, and as "we 
students" were usually where there was any excitement, we 
were numerously present. 

My zeal to get as near "next" to Queen Victoria's son, future 
King of England and Emperor of India, as I could, and to effect 
a "scoop" over my fellows stimulated me to a rash undertaking. 

I had with me quite a bunch of papers which I had used in 
moot court that morning, and taking these in my hand I said to a 
militia officer: "Let me pass," showing the documents, and pushed 
through. He evidently took me for a messenger, or "bearer of 
dispatches," and I went through unmolested toward the steamer 
landing where the reception committee had gathered. It seemed 
a mile across the square, so apprehensive was I of being inter- 
fered with by some of the mounted military officers and forced 
back to the crowd with the sure jeers of my fellow students who 
were watching me. Fortunately, just as I started, guns thundered, 
bells rang and whistles blew, for the steamer was near and at- 
tracted .everybody's attention; so I safely joined the group of 
"prominent citizens" delegated to receive the Prince. When the 
distinguished party landed I was of those who received the royal 
handshake. 

A little time elapsed before the waiting carriages were entered 
and driven off, so I had a good look at the royal party. The 
noblemen, including Lord Lyons and the Duke of Newcastle, 
were grave, dignified and stately; but the Prince, who was just- 
about my age, seemed natural and unaffected, and I "voted" him 
an attractive and likable young gentleman. 

Not being invited to a seat in the carriages, I soon became one 
of the common crowd, but considered my forced opportunity 
worth the risk I had taken. 

The party was entertained at Congress Hall, a hotel then 
located just north of the old capitol building and on ground now 
occupied by the new capitol. 

Another exciting occasion was that of a Convention of Aboli- 
tionists which promised all sorts of trouble and experienced some. 



4 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

There were open threats that the convention would not be per- 
mitted to hold its sessions, and animosity grew to alarming pro- 
portions. The Mayor declared that the convention would be 
protected if he had to call out the militia; not because of sympathy 
with abolitionism but to protect free speech. . 

The first night of the convention arrived/ and a considerable' 
representation of the Law School squeezed into the crowded 
Young Men's Association Hall expecting trouble, in fact looking 
for it. 

Among the notable Abolitionists present were Elizabeth Cady 
Stanton; that dear 'little Quaker lady, Lucretia Mott; Beriah 
Green of Rhode Island; Gerrit Smith, and others. 

The audience was noisy and threatening, and the first speaker 
did not proceed far because of the "cat calls," stamping and 
epithets which made hearing impossible. 

The Mayor took the platform and asked for better behavior, 
insisting that the speakers would be heard and that order must 
be preserved; that he was prepared to enforce all this by a large 
number of special police and that the local militia were then drill- 
ing at the armory, ready to be used if necessary. 

The Mayor was asked if he proposed to suppress applause and 
he replied that he did not. This reply was greeted with stamping 
of feet, clapping of hands and loud cheers, indicating that they 
could use a noisy pretension of applause for their purpose. 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton then tried to be heard, but the ap- 
plause (?) was too deafening and she gave it up. 

An ugly condition prevailed for a while, when there were calls 
for Gerrit Smith repeated from all parts of the hall — "We will 
hear Gerrit Smith." "Smith!" "Smith!" 

That gentleman sitting near the platform finally arose in the 
dignity of his splendid figure and attractive features and facing 
the audience, deliberately said: "Gerrit Smith will not be heard 
from any platform where liberty of speech is denied another," 
and sat down. 

After consultation it was decided to adjourn the convention. 
The Mayor instructed the policemen present to prevent the 
exit of the audience until its members had retired, and one after 
another they left the ha!!, 'mid the epithets and insults of the 
almost mob. 

The next afternoon another large audience gathered, but it 
was fairly decent in its behavior. Besides others, Gerrit Smith 
spoke, quite entirely; as was his custom, in answer to questions 
from the audience. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 5 

In one part of the hall a little coterie of well-known Albanians 
were gathered, including George Dawson and Peter Cagger, 
and they were evidently suggesting questions for others to put 
to Mr. Smith. 

We observed one of our fellow students, well known to us for 
his conceit and love of the "limelight/' edging his way by degrees 
to the vicinity of these men and finally taking a vacated seat 
quite among them. We supposed he made known his willingness 
to ask questions and, to appearance, a question was suggested to 
him, for he arose and said: "Mr. Smith, may I trouble you with 
a question that troubles me?" "Certainly, young man," Mr. 
Smith benignantly replied. "Mr. Smith, I would like to have 
your opinion of miscegenation." There was laughter, but Mr. 
Smith in a fatherly and sympathetic voice and manner replied: 
"I am indeed sorry that you are having trouble with this question 
and I do not know that I can help you very much. I will say, 
however, that I married a white woman; but think it over very 
seriously, young man, then go ahead and do as you please." 
'Mid roars of laughter and applause our discomfited fellow 
student sat down. While he remained in the school he was called 
"Miscegenation" and too often for his happiness was asked 
whether he had decided to marry the "coon," with variations of 
the question, making him regret the day he "spoke in meetin'." 

Fortunately, the convention ended without the riotous results 
that were feared and which at times were imminent. 

Looking backward from afterwards, it hardly seems possible 
that these sincere and courageous reformers should have incurred 
such hatred and suffered such manifestation of it as did this band 
of anti-slavery men and women in the capital of a free state; 
but it was only one instance in a long similar experience in other 
places and at other times. 

A notable Peace Convention was held in Albany early in 1861. 
It brought together many able men who sincerely desired to avert 
the stress of war which even then seemed inevitable. It was a 
large and solemn but not an influential gathering. It seemed a 
cry for the impossible. Some ambitious men lost political prestige 
by their participation and utterances, but many of these pacifist 
delegates rendered fine patriotic service during the war. 

Probably the most distinguished person present was ex-President 
V an Buren, and although he died about a year afterward, he was 
still a ruddy-faced, venerable octogenarian worth looking at. 

I had seen Mr. Van Buren before. In the late fall of 1S44 my 
father took me with him on a drive from Essex County to Columbia 



6 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

County. Although less than five years old I remember many 
incidents of that trip. We stopped over night at Kinderhook, 
where Mr. Van Buren resided, and as my father was an admirer 
of "The Fox of Linden wald," he took me with him for a call. 
I remember that Mr. Van Buren was very gracious, very friendly. 
He took me on his knee and said pretty things, which later on 
in life, observing the manner of politicians, I concluded was 
mostly to please my father. The then presidential campaign — 
Polk versus Clay — was talked about and remaining, perhaps an 
hour, we returned to the hotel. I thought Mr. Van Buren had a 
fine house. 

I remember seeing for the first time a locomotive and passenger 
train at Schenectady on that trip and the chestnuts we picked 
from under roadside trees of a frosty morning. We had no chest- 
nuts in Essex County. I also remember the political gatherings 
and demonstrations we saw — the live foxes of the Democrats, 
the coons of the Whigs and the banners of Clay and Frclinghuysen 
and Polk and Dallas. Very likely my memory of these things 
was helped by hearing the trip talked over at times afterwards. 

Law School students spent much time in the State Library, 
reading cases referred to in our lectures, preparing for moot courts, 
etc. Alfred B. Street, the poet, was the librarian. He was medium 
sized, spare of build with locks of hair projecting forward of his 
ears to near his eyes, rather stooping of shoulder and had a more 
"ancient" aspect than his years warranted. Lie was somewhat 
irritable and easily annoyed, and I am sure he counted the students' 
presence in the library somewhat of a nuisance. 

One cold winter day he noticed a couple of students with their 
feet raised against the edge of a marble-topped radiator. He 
approached them with some wrapping paper and said, in sarcastic 
kindliness: "Young men, if you will drop your feet I'll put paper 
over the hot marble so you won't burn your shoes. You are 
away from home and I'd like to be a mother to you." Of course 
the feet came down and remained down. He was really angry 
and had some reason for it in the careless thoughtlessness of these 
students. 
• I always bowed to him when passing, and he not only returned 
it, but, now and then, would say "Good morning." or make some 
reference to the weather, so i did not consider him so much the 
"grouch" that most of the students did. 

He asked me one morning to come into his office. He appeared 
irritated and I expected something unpleasant. He asked me to 
sit down and showed me proofs of engravings which he said were 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 



intended to illustrate a book he was publishing and which his pub- 
lishers had submitted for approval. He was unpoetically dis- 
satisfied with them. 

Referring to one of the proofs representing a meadow with 
woods in the background and a rustic snake-fence at one side, 
he asked: " Young man, what do you call these humps in that 
field? " I replied that they looked like boulders. 

"Right you are," he continued, "but they are intended for 
hay cocks — a country scene at haying-time," and he flew into 
many phrases of condemnation. "That picture," he said, "ought 
to be so delicate and true to nature as to make one scent the 
new-mown hay and hear the singing of birds." 

I suggested that that effect was probably supplied by the text 
itself. 

"The illustration should interpret the text," he said. "It is a 
miserable failure and I won't stand for it." 

He then read me the text, all his anger disappearing, and I 
tried to be an appreciative listener, in fact, I enjoyed it. 

He looked over some of the other proofs; the engravings 
did seem coarse and his anger returned as he commented upon 
them. I said to him that I was no critic. "All right," he said, 
"I just received them and wanted to see how some one else re- 
garded them in an off-hand way." I thanked him for the op- 
portunity of meeting him and he thanked me for "coming in," 
and we afterwards met as acquaintances. 

In a walk one pleasant afternoon I discovered the studio or 
workshop of E. D. Palmer, the sculptor, and the door being open 
I asked permission to enter, which was pleasantly granted. Mr. 
Palmer was busily at work on a block of marble which already 
revealed part of the head and shoulders of a young girl. I be- 
came fascinated with the impression that the figure was im- 
prisoned in the stone and that he was patiently releasing it from 
its rigid environment. 

He asked if I lived in Albany and with other kindly in- 
quiries encouraged prolonging my stay. In leaving I thanked 
him and he said, "Come again, any time." 

I did call again when he was working on a model in clay. In 
our little conversation I said that I thought painters had quite 
an advantage over sculptors in the ease with which lines could 
»>e changed with a brush on canvas as compared with a chisel on 
stone. 

'Yes, indeed," he replied, "can't patch up stone very well, 
v <> we must be precise and exact in our work. We can shrink our 



8 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

figures but can't swell them. Tu this clay modeling we have plenty 
of freedom," and he put on a bit of clay to round out a line. 

Students had large opportunities for picking up law and practice 
in the courts held in Albany, and I was a habitual frequenter of 
these tribunals from Police Court to that of Appeals. The city 
had some exceptionally able local lawyers, and many interesting j 
cases were tried and others argued on appeal by lawyers from all 
parts. 

An interesting trial occupying some days was founded on the 
leasing of a giraffe — I think the only one then in captivity in 
this country — by the Spaulding Circus, a " floater" on the 
Mississippi river and its tributaries, from P. T. Barnum. Barnum 
sent the valuable animal's keeper with the beast by steamer 
from New York to New Orleans. On arrival, Spaulding, largely 
for advertising purposes, invited the Mayor and a number of 
prominent New Orleans people to go down the Mississippi on a 
chartered steamer to meet the "new glory" which was to be 
added to the Spaulding "aggregation." 

The transferring of the animal from the steamer on which it 
arrived was so carelessly handled that it fell in the Mississippi 
and was either drowned or died from the effects of the bath. 

The question was largely whether the giraffe-keeper was Bar- 
nura's agent; in fact, whether the giraffe had been delivered under 
the contract — whether it was in Bamum's or Spaulding's pos- 
session when it died. 

I believe the suit was brought by Barnum for the value of the 
animal, and Spaulding counter-claimed for damages because of 
its non-delivery. One considerable item of damage claimed by 
Spaulding was for advertising Lithographs of the giraffe; but it 
was shown that the lithographs were used all the same. Damage 
was also claimed for lost revenue which a live giraffe would have 
earned, although the "show" advertised "A living monster 
giraffe," with only a stuffed specimen. 

The trial revealed many "tricks" of showmen and was interest- I 
ing in the close questions of law and fact involved, as was the 
story itself, the skill of the lawyers and the considerable humor 
involved and evolved. Some of us almost begrudged being out 
of court for our lectures during this trial. 

It was a rare privilege to be present at times during the long 
argument in the Court of Appeals of the notable Parish Will 
Case with Charles O'Connor and William M. Evarts pitted against 
each other. It was certainly a forensic battle royal between these 
giants of the American Bar. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 9 

At a General Term of the Supreme Court held in Albany, 
quite a number of our students decided, largely for the adventure, 
to .*u»i»!y for admission to the bar, although most of them had not 
read in a law office and been but a short tirrle with the law school. 
Tt was a sort of joke, but the examination proved to be hurried 
and elemental and quite all the applicants were admitted. 

The only question asked of one of the applicants was in the 
nature of a hypothetical case. A farmer riding on a load of hay 
along the public highway from a meadow to his barn in crossing 
a defective culvert it gave way, throwing the farmer to the ground 
and resulting in serious physical injuries. He commenced an 
action against the town commissioner of highways for damages. . | 

The question was: "Can he recover?' 7 The brilliant candidate 
for admission promptly replied: "I beg your pardon, but you 
forget that I am not a medical student." 

Many of those who were admitted left the school, perhaps to 
hang out their " shingles" and commence learning law by practic- 
ing it, and learning economy by practicing that also. 

It was no small advantage to have the opportunity of hearing 
the several distinguished clergymen serving Albany churches at 
that period, and the students, in large part, attended church with 
fair regularity, if not the same church regularly. 

The legislature was not omitted from our self-arranged curri- 
culum. We became somewhat familiar, by sight and " sound," 
with the more prominent of the lawmakers and we were quite 
sure to be well represented on occasions of important dis- 
cussions or proceedings of special interest, getting "doses" 
of parliamentary law, legislative procedure, political maneuvers, 
etc. — • a really interesting experience. 

The law students had the privileges of the lectures of the Medical 
School, and many of us were habitual attendants at the Saturday 
clinics with their free surgical operations. Dr. March was then 
a prominent and skillful surgeon as well as an attractive man. 
He often ordered the doors locked so that there would be no 
interruption by the hasty getting away of the students when some 
serious operation tried their nerves. Sometimes students fainted 
and they were not always law students, either. We learned 
something of surgery and of legal jurisprudence at these climes; 
but in spite of Dr. March's then up-to-dateness in his profession, 
surgery was far behind what it has come to be. 

During that autumn of 1SG0 and until election there were 
numerous political mass meetings with notable* orators and "spell 
binders" in behalf of the four presidential candidates. There 



10 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

were also great torchlight processions, gathered often from con- 
siderable distances about Albany, "Wide Awakes," " Little 
Giants/' "Bell Ringers" and other marching multitudes, pre- 
figuring the "tramp, tramp" of militant hosts that were to gather, 
march and die in the Civil War. 

William L. Yancy spoke in the rotunda of the old capitol, and 
the threats he made if Mr. Lincoln were elected and the abuse he 
hurled at him and his followers greatly angered me; but that he 
had sympathizers was too evident in the applause which greeted 
his rabid utterances. But as lurid as were this "fire-eater's" 
threats, they were largely prophetic, after all. 

Mr. Lincoln on his way to his inauguration stopped in Albany 
for a day and night. He was due in the forenoon and to be 
received by a joint session of the legislature in the Assembly 
Chamber. As the hour of his arrival was uncertain, a few of 
us law students hurried to the capitol early to secure front seats 
in the gallery and fearing his arrival might be delayed until 
afternoon, we provided ourselves with a luncheon. Before noon, 
however, the sound of cheers and bands announced his coming. 
Finally, the members of the legislature came in led by the Lieu- 
tenant Governor, and the galleries and rotunda filled to capacity 
with a multitude unable to even look into the building. 

Mr. Lincoln entered 'mid clapping of hands, cheers and shouts. 
This tall, gaunt figure; this plain-faced, sad-featured man. later 
on familiar to all the world from portraiture and caricature; this 
child of poverty and "man of destiny" — to be the one great 
character of all history » stood before us in the simplicity of his 
simple nature. 

The Lieutenant Governor made the address of welcome. In 
the excitement no one had taken Mr. Lincoln's hat, but now as 
he was to respond he put his hat on the speaker's desk behind 
him, remarking, "I suppose it will be safe here?" This innocent 
pleasantry was afterward criticized by some as insulting to the 
legislature — especially as one of its members was then being 
tried, and later expelled, for bribe taking — but it was a far- 
fetched and unwarranted cavil. 

Having disposed of his hat, Mr. Lincoln spoke solemnly and 
forcibly; his speech is said to be the best speech of the many he 
made en route from Springfield to Washington.* Some time was 
spent in introductions and handshaking, after which Mr. Lincoln 

* I remember this sentence of hid speech which much impressed me: " While 
I hold myself, without mock modesty, the humblest of all the individuals 
who have ever been elected Pn^sitii u?~ of the United States, 1 yet have a more 
diOicult task before me than any one of (hem has encountered." 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 11 

retired, but we lingered to the very last, gazing at where he stood, 
although we did not comprehend, could not measure the great- 
ness of the man, even from what he had already achieved, and 
little did we realize the deserved world glory which was to be 
Ins forever. 

And, oh, the pity of it! After years of burden-bearing, heart- 
ache, wearing anxiety and final victory, his martyr body was to 
be borne westward through a grief-stricken nation and He for 
some hours in that same Assembly Chamber! 

That night a public reception for Mr. Lincoln was held at the 
Delevan House, and we got into the street-packed crowd and were 
forced by the power behind us into Mr. Lincoln's presence. Many 
were injured in the crush, but we had his hearty handshake and 
felt abundantly rewarded. 

On the street a fine band furnished music and I heard " Dixie " 
for the first, but by no means for the last time. 

The few of us who had been together counted the day as a great 
one and that estimate has increased with me ever since. 

Some of the Law School secured permits to visit the Dudley 
Observatory, entitling us to attention which was always politely 
given, and we had some practical illustrations of astronomy 
furnished by the telescope and the explanations of those in charge. 

It can be seen that the students of the Law School at that 
period had many and valuable opportunities for supplementing 
the instruction of the school, and some of us made the most of 
these advantages. 

The student body largely consisted of college men with their 
advantage of intellectual training, and many of them brought 
with them their experience in prankish, frolicsome mischief and 
fun and made use of it in varied schemes for puncturing the 
conceit and egotism of some of their fellow students. Some of 
their inventions, fakes, and practical jokes were real works of 
art, details of which would make good stories, some of which I 
am almost tempted to relate. 

A large portion of that Law School class of 1SG1 entered the 
army during the Civil War, and I met some of them while in the 
service, but of the more than one hundred I have met but few 
through the years and continued the acquaintance of a still less 
number. 

At the Semi-Centennial of the school I met but one of my class, 
General Thomas Hubbard of New York, who had achieved dis- 
tinctive prominence as a lawyer, railroad magnate, soldier, 
capitalist; philanthropist and citizen. 



12 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

On that occasion General Parker presided and called the classes 
by their class years, and if any members of these classes were 
present they were asked to respond. 

In calling one of these classes, I forget the year, only one man 
responded. General Parker said to him, "You were in the same 
class with President McKinley?" The man answered, "Yes, 
I thought I was — then/' and as the wit of the reply percolated 
there was decided merriment. 

In the spring of 1861 1 received my L.L.B. "sheepskin," re- 
turned to Essex and reentered Mr. Havens' law office, awaiting 
my majority to apply for admission to the bar, and at a General 
Term of the Supreme Court held at Plattsburgh in -May, 1861, 
I was admitted. 

The class admitted at that time was quite a large one and quite 
all of them became distinguished lawyers. I have always indulged 
a pride in being one of that class, notwithstanding my non-con- 
tribution to its aggregate forensic fame. 

In that class were Dennis O'Brien, afterwards Court of Appeals 
Judge; Leslie W. Russell, afterwards Attorney General of the 
State and Justice of the Supreme Court; Richard L. Hand, 
justly distinguished in his profession; French of Saratoga and 
Rogers of Washington County, both returned from the Civil War 
with the rank of Colonel and Brevet-Brigadier General; Dobie 
of Plattsburgh who served in our regiment as Captain and, later, 
Surrogate of his County and Warden of Clinton Prison; L'Ame- 
reaux of Ballston Spa. who became Judge of his County; Watson 
of Clinton, afterwards Count}' Judge, and others whose names 
I do not now recall. 

Forty years after this I chanced to be in Plattsburgh when Judge 
Russell was holding a term of court, and he referred to the fact 
of the time being almost exactly the fortieth anniversary of our 
admission to the bar, R. L. Hand and some others of that class 
being then present. Judge Alonzo Kellogg hearing of this gave 
a dinner in honor of the anniversary, inviting Hon. Smith M. 
Weed and other lawyers, and it was an enjoyable affair. 

President Lincoln had l**en inaugurated and uttered the wonder- 
fully pacific sentiment- of his famous inaugural address; but it 
counted scarcely at all m lessening the war passion of the South, 
or the unreason of its sympathisers in the North; for there was 
a large open-mouthed and seemingly dangerous Northern opposi- 
tion to any measure iov forcibly resisting secession. 

But Fort Sumter iva's fired upon; our flag had been defied, 
and this suddenly and largely unified the North. Meri who had 



ADIRONDACK REG LATENT 13 

loudly denounced war to preserve the Union seriously joined in 
the work of preparedness. There were criticisms of the administra- 
tion and plenty of faultfinding; but real opposition became a 
negligible quantity — for a time. 

I had felt the impulse to enlist at times, and after the battle of 
Bull Run T applied for and received authority from our Governor 
to enlist men, but at about the same time W. D. Ross, lawyer, 
of Essex, wanted to do the same thing and I was persuaded to 
relinquish my authority in his behalf. 

He enlisted a number of men and received a commission as 
first lieutenant. Shortly after, while in Washington, he was 
killed by a locomotive as he was crossing a railroad track in that 
city. 

The early summer of 1862 was a particularly gloomy period 
in the history of our Civil War. More than a year had passed 
since the shock of Bull Run, bringing but few bright spots in the 
conflict, while the " altogether" was disspiritingly unfavorable. 

The great Peninsula Campaign, from which so much was ex- 
pected and which had its successes, was as a whole a sad failure. 
Its awful harvest of disease, mutilation and death was in evidence 
in every town and hamlet and in most homes. Everywhere were 
returned soldiers wasted by disease or crippled by wounds, and 
everywhere mourning for husbands, sons, brothers and lovers 
who would never return was grievously visible. 

The awfulness of the war was manifest and its probable years 
of duration became depressingly evident. 

But while the splendid Army of the Potomac (more nearly 
victorious than it knew) lay panting and dismembered from its 
months of continuous conflict against disease and an entrenched 
and alert defensive enemy, it was easy to believe that the enemy 
had also suffered the wasting influence of that notable campaign. 

In the midst of this depressing gloom came the startling but 
heartening call of our President for 300.000 men for three years! 

It was an awakening call and aroused the patriotism of the 
people. The pessimists, and they were a plenty, believed that 
with so much serious demonstration of what enlistment meant 
the call could not be met by volunteers. They underestimated 
the patriotic spirit of the people. 

Out of these conditions and under these circumstances came 
the " Adirondack Regiment" — the USth New York Volunteers 
Infantry — which served for three years, lacking only a few days. 

^n apportioning the call in the State of New York, the raising 
oi a full regiment was assigned to each Senatorial district. Ours, 



14 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

* 

consisting of the counties of Clinton, Essex and Warren, was the 
sixteenth district, then represented by Senator R. M. Little of 
Glens Falls. 

A Senatorial District Committee was promptly appointed, by 
the Governor I believe, made up of prominent citizens of the 
three counties, to have charge of raising the allotted regiment. • 
Four companies of the proposed regiment were assigned to Clinton, 
three to Essex and three to "little" Warren. 

The counties were divided into company districts, naming the 
towns which should raise a company, each company group of 
towns to have its own subcommittee. 

The Senatorial Committee conceived the novel idea of having 
the regimental and company officers selected in advance of en- 
listments of men and having these proposed officers do the work 
of securing the men. It was thought that by selecting men of 
character and influence for officers, enlisting men would know 
who would command them and be favorably influenced. 

This Regimental Committee selected for Colonel, Samuel T. 
Richards of Warren; Lieutenant Colonel, Oliver Keese, Jr., of 
Essex, and for Major, George F. Nichols of Clinton. 

The selection of company officers was left to the company 
committees of towns. 

Mr. Havens, afterwards State Senator, myself and several others 
were the committee for the towns in which my town of Essex was, 
and a meeting of this committee was held at Elizabeth! own. 
Robert W. Livingston, a lawyer and editor of Elizabethtown, was 
unanimously selected for Captain of the proposed company, 
but there was no agreement as to first lieutenant, and the meeting 
adjourned for one week. 

After adjournment Hon. Orlando Kellogg, a friend whom I 
highly esteemed then and more so ever after, called me into his 
office and said, in substance, that he did not favor any of the 
men suggested for the lieutenancy, and as a son of his would 
be in the company, he had a right to be particular about its officers. 
He finally said: "You have no personal family and your law 
business is just beginning, so you would make no great sacrifice 
if you should take this lieutenancy. I am sure you would have 



you?" 



\> 



i 



been named to-day if we knew that you would go. Xow, will 



I replied that whatever reasons I might have for not going, I 
would not dare to refuse such a call at such a time. "That settles 
it," he said; "I am sure you will be unanimously 'called. 7 " 

I had had enlistment "spasms," occasional convictions that I 




Colonel 
SAMUEL T. RICHARDS 




- , -~\ * * 



Colonel 
OLIVER KEESE, Jr. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT - 15 

ought to do so, but being slight of body (120 pounds) and having 
by no moans rugged health, it seemed to me and my friends that 
I had very little service to offer. Here, however, was a distinct 
call, if it came. 

We went to Elizabethtown on the day to Which our committee 
adjourned and arriving late — we had made a sixteen-mile drive 
on a warm day — met the committee coming out of Kellogg and 
Hale's law office, where it had met. Their greeting was: "Go home 
and enlist your men, you have been unanimously selected." 

Although I had thought of this probability for a week, this 
announcement took on a sudden seriousness. I was not con- 
gratulated, but kindly and encouraging things were said. Mr. 
Kellogg with much feeling assured me that I could count upon 
him for any service or favor which he might be able to render, 
then or thereafter. As he had been in Congress with President 
Lincoln, and now uas a candidate for Congress, sure to be elected, 
this promise meant much and he meant what he said. 

The next day I commenced enlisting the forty men apportioned 
to me and in ten days went to Plattsburgh, our regimental rendez- 
vous, with more than my complement of men and at the cost of 
$40.75 to the state. This rapidity of enlistment was also true 
all over the three counties. 

We found a large number of men already gathered at the 
IT. S. barracks, mostly boys, but of good soldier quality and 
volunteers in the full sense of the word. While some enlistments 
were the result of interviews and persuasion, most came of their 
own accord. There were no physical examinations at first and 
no thorough examinations when we arrived at our regimental 
rendezvous. We took all who looked able-bodied and appeared 
sound-minded — "kids in their goslinghood," but no "old men 
in their dotage." The boys would grow older every day. 

We held one "war meeting," in the town of Moriah, and a 
large gathering was addressed by Hon. 0. Kellogg, myself and 
others, and the full quota of men apportioned to that town was 
filled that night. I was the guest of Mr. John G. Witherbee 
of Port Henry on this occasion and thus commenced an ap- 
preciated friendship which continued while he lived. 

Arriving at the barracks we slept on straw spread on the floors, 
but there was so much hilarity during most of the night that 
there was little sleep, even for those who desired it. The spirit 
of youth was abundant and abundantly exercised. Our minimum 
age limit was eighteen, but many of less age claimed to be eighteen 
and were not closely questioned about their real age. 



1G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Lieutenant Charles E. Pruyn of Albany, who had had field ser- 
vice as an officer in the 9Gth New York Volunteers, even in the then 
recent Peninsula Campaign, represented the Military Department 
of the State. He was commissioned to organize the regiment 
and, of course, practically in command of the post. He was a 
fine specimen of young manhood with a liking for and considerable 
knowledge of military affairs from also serving in the militia 
before his field service. He rendered valuable aid in organizing 
our regiment and finally accepted its adjutancy with promise of 
being made major when vacancy might arrive; so we had the 
continued helpfulness of his experience and precise military 
methods, which I consider as having had an important influence 
in making "ours" the fine organization it came to be. 

Although without uniform and wearing an unsoldierly variety 
of citizen dress for a while, drilling commenced at once, and the 
citizens so quickly brought together commenced being transformed 
into a regimental fighting machine. It was called the " Adirondack 
Regiment" and when organized and accepted by the state became 
the 118th Regiment of New York Volunteers, Infantry. The 
men consisted of clergymen, lawyers, physicians, college men, 
farmers, mechanics, merchants, clerks — all classes of professional 
and industrial callings, and of many creeds. 

The companies were lettered from A to K (omitting the letter J) 
in the order of completed company organization, which also es- 
tablished the companies' respective rank. Companies A, D and 
G were Warren County companies; B, H, I and K, Clinton 
County, and Companies ('. F and E, Essex County, and so it 
happened that the three ranking companies, A, B and C, re- 
spectively, represented the three counties of the regimental district. 
In the formation of the regiment in line of battle, A had the right, 
B the left and C the center as color company. 

Our Company, F, was sixth in rank and second from the right 
in line of regimental formation. 

The people of-Plattshurg were kindly and we had good reason 
to remember the favors of Hon. and Mrs. Smith M. Weed whose 
generous and gracious hospitality many of us enjoyed. 

Every day we were visited by the relatives and friends of the 
"boys" from all parts, so we had many pleasures mixed with our 
daily routine of garrison life. 

We finally received our clothing, and as there was imminent 
need of men at th.' front, we expected marching orders every day 
during the latter {.art of August. In view of this our guard 
duty was made inure severe, even to the extent of furnishing 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 17 

guards with a few available muskets, loaded and with instructions 

. . . 

to shoot if necessary. Canada being so near, it was feared that. 

some "repentant" volunteer might take a liking for that neutral 

country. 

As officer of the guard on my rounds one night, in repeating 
the countersign to a sentinel over the muzzle of his loaded musket 
according to his instructions, my "military career" came near 
ending then and there. This guard afterward told me that he 
had his musket cocked against emergency, and in his nervous 
over-anxiety while receiving the countersign his finger pressed 
the trigger so hard, unconsciously, that the hammer fell, but 
his thumb chanced to be upon the percussion cap and the 
only result was his bruised thumb. He said he was so shocked 
at what might have been, that he became too ill to remain on 
guard and was relieved. I knew nothing of my narrow escape 
until months later. 
j A few days before we left Plattsburgh we marched to the village 

square where a large crowd of citizens had gathered and we were 
addressed by Hon. Orlando Kellogg and others. Kellogg's speech 
was eloquent, effective and fatherly, and we began to call him the 
"Father of our Regiment." His thoughtful kindness to us 
during our three years 7 service justified this affectionate title. 

In this square was a town pump quite conspicuous for size, 
and it was said that one of our officers returning from a dinner 
party one night rather late and rather happy, meandered across 
this square in the dark and ran against this pump. He thought 
he was being held up by some one and indistinctly noticing the 
pump handle he stepped back saying, "I don't know who the 
hell you are, but if ycr'll drop yer club I'll fight yer to a finish!'' 

Marching orders came, and on the night of the first day of 
September, 1862, we marched through a drizzling rain to the 
steamer for Whitehall, leaving about nine o'clock p.m. The 
streets were lined with men, women and children shouting their 
good-byes with occasional audible sobs as near and dear ones 
passed by — it was more solemn than hilarious to marchers and 
lookers-on. 

The second Battle of Bull Run had been fought without check- 
ing the northward march of Lee's Army, and its purpose to invade 
Pennsylvania was evident. Even the Federal capital was in 
danger. Fear, apprehension and anxiety prevailed, and not since 
the very commencement of the war were men moving towards 
the conflict so thoroughly appreciated, and never before was tiie 
seriousness of their mission so fully understood; and so it was 






18 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

that our journey south was a continuous ovation, so far as oppor- 
tunity was given. 

Our steamer made no stops, and what sleep we got that night 
was on the decks of the steamer, except a few officers who had 
staterooms. Many slept but little, keeping awake to watch 
the west shore of the lake where the homes of many of the Essex 
County boys were. It may be considered certain that there was 
much serious thinking, but until almost morning fun and frolic 
prevailed. 

Roster of the original officers of the regiment — those who went 
out with it — with memoranda of their age, promotions, etc. 

FIELD AND STAFF 

Colonel. Samuel T. Richards; age 38; discharged for dis- 
ability, July, 1863. 

Lieutenant Colonel. Oliver Keese; age 33; colonel, August, 
1863; discharged for disability, September, 1864. 

Major. George F. Nichols; age 23; lieutenant colonel, 
August, 1863; colonel, November, 1S64; discharged with regiment. 

Adjutant. Charles E. Pruyn of Albany; age 21; major, 
August, 1863; killed in action near Petersburg, June, 1864. 

Chaplain. Charles L. Hagar of Plattsburgh; mustered-out 
with regiment. 

Quartermaster. Patrick K. DeLaxey; discharged, August, 
1864, to accept promotion as captain and assistant quartermaster 
U. S. Volunteers. 

Surgeon. Dr. John II. MooEtis; age 34; discharged for dis- 
ability, April, 1S64. 

Assistant Surgeon. Dr. James G. Porteous ; age 23 ; discharged, 
November, 1864, for promotion to surgeon 46th N. Y. Volunteers. 



LINE OFFICERS 

Company A. Captain. Jos i ah H. Norris; age 30; resigned, 
January, 1S64. 

First Lieutenant. Edward Rkjgs; age 25; made captain of 
Company D, December, 1862; discharged for disability, August, 
1863. 

Second Lieutenant. Simeon E. Chamberlix; age 28; discharged 
to accept captaincy in 25th N T - Y. Cavalry, May, 1S64. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 19 

Company B. Captain. Levi S. Dominy; age 30; made major, 
August, 1S64; lieutenant colonel, September, 1864; discharged 
with regiment. 

First Lieutenant. John L. Carter; age 24; made adjutant, 
July, 1863; lost arm at Drury's Bluff, May, 1864, and captured; 
discharged for wound, October, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. Joseph M. Tenny; age 30; made first 
lieutenant, July, 1863; resigned, January, 1864. 

Company C. Captain. James H. Pierce; age 37; captured 
at Drury's Bluff, May, 1864; discharged for disability, February, 
1865. 

First Lieutenant. Nathan L. Washburn; age 39; resigned, 
February, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant. George M. Butrick; age 21; resigned, 
February, 1863. 



Company D. Captain. Richard P. Smith; age 39; discharged 
for disability, December, 1862. 

First Lieutenant. Cyrus 0. Burge; age 39; discharged for 
disability, November, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant. John H. Smith, Jr.; age 35; first lieutenant, 
November, 1862; discharged for disability, January, 1863. 

Company E. Captain. Jacob Parmerter; age 41; lost a leg 
at Cold Harbor, June, 1S64; discharged for wounds, December, 
1864. 

First Lieutenant. Joseph R. Seaman; age 27; captain, Company 
A, January, 1864; discharged with regiment. 

Second Lieutenant. John Brydon; age 26; first lieutenant, 
January, 1864; captain, Company K, June, 1S64; discharged with 
regiment. 



Company F. Captain. Robert W. Livingston; age 52; 
twice severely wounded at Drury's Bluff, May, 1864; in hospital 
for more than a year; discharged with regiment. 

First Lieutenant. John L. Cunningham; age 22; captain 
Company D, August, 1S63; major, September, 1864; discharged 
with regiment. 

Second Lieutenant. William H. Stevenson; age 21; first 
lieutenant, November, 1863; killed at Drury's BlufT, May, 1864. 



20 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Company G. Captain. Dennis Stone; age 27; captured at 
Drury's Bluff, May, 1864; resigned, May, 1865. 

First Lieutenant. Stephen H. Smith; age 24; resigned, No- 
vember, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant. M. Nelson Dickinson; age 32; first 
lieutenant, November, 1862; severely wounded and captured at 
Fair Oaks, October, 1864; discharged for wounds, May, 1865. 

Company H. Captain. William H. Bailey; age 27; resigned. 
April, 1864. 

First Lieutenant. David F. Dobie; age 22; captain, April, 
1864; discharged with regiment. 

Second Lieutenant. Sylvester Mattoon; age 24; resigned, 
June, 1863. 

Company I. Captain. Henry S. Ransom; age 38; lost an 
arm at Drury's Bluff, May, 1864; discharged for wounds, No- 
vember, 1864. 

First Lieutenant. Lyman C. Holbrook; age 42; resigned, 
February, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant. Martin V. B. Stetson; age 23; first 
lieutenant, February, 1863; captain, November, 1864; discharged 
with regiment. 

Company K. Captain. John S. Stone; age 39; killed at 
Drury's Bluff, May, 1S64. 

First Lieutenant. John S. Boynton; age 36; resigned, Febru- 
ary, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant. Henry M. Mould; age 19; resigned, 
July, 1863. 

Early in the morning of September 2, we reached Whitehall, 
where we found a long train ready for our journey to Albany. 
There were a few old passenger coaches, but mostly box with a few 
platform cars. An effort was made to "pack" the box cars, but 
the men gathered in "bunches" at the doors, pretending that the 
car was already crowded to suffocation, and all were decidedly 
indignant that we were going as "freight." Much time was spent 
in loading the men and in providing more cars. Men " sneaked " 
sticks of cord-wood into the cars from a handy pile, and when we 
started they began pounding off the sides of the box cars so they 
could look out through the framework and "see the country."' 
Large damage was done, and I have wondered whether the Reus- 




"^S, 



Colonel 
GEORGE F. NICHOLS 







Major 
JOHN L. CUNNINGHAM 



1 

ABiaONPACJK REGIMENT 21 

selaer and Saratoga Railroad ever received compensation for this 
damage. If not, little profit was made on our transportation. 

We found with us at Whitehall, Mrs. Fay, the bright, young 
and fair bride of a sergeant of Company C, who resolved to con- 
tinue with her husband as long and as much as possible, and we 
all helped her purpose. She remained through the years, in camps 
and, often, on our marches. In times of war activity she rendered 
helpful service in the hospitals, especially to men of our regiment. 
She had our respect all through, and deserved it. 

We reached Saratoga Springs, then in the height of its summer 
season, and were met at the station, seemingly, by the whole 
permanent and visiting population with the wildest sort of en- 
thusiastic demonstration. The young women were excitedly 
11 cordial" to the extent of seeing who could kiss the largest number 
of soldiers, and as they met with little resistance some made proud 
scores. The while we were there, there was a carnival of uncon- 
ventional hilarity and all sorts of manifestations of good-will and 
appreciation. Men, women and children were active and noisy in 
assuring us of their grateful estimation of the service we repre- 
sented — for it was an exciting period of the War just then. 

One demure little maiden excitedly rushed up to me and said: 
"Lieutenant, I'm a Philadelphia girl and if you will give me a 
button from your coat, I'll give you an honest patriotic kiss." 
I met this same girl two } r ears later in Norfolk, where she and her 
mother made a few weeks stay, her father being then in command 
of a battery of light artillery near that city. 

Soldiers' buttons were in demand that morning in Saratoga; 
many were left as souvenirs, and some coats became almost 
buttonless. 

Personal addresses were exchanged and correspondence asked 
and promised, and there was correspondence in two cases I knew 
of — one ceasing only with the death of the soldier. 

Flowers, fruit and confections were given us, and in some cases 
bits of jewelry were parted with, while lots of our boys had ladies' 
handkerchiefs and gloves as keepsakes. We left 'mid cheers and 
tears, for there were many moist eyes among even the jolliest. 

One of our officers referred to this stop at Saratoga as a "Jov 
liiot." 

We reached Albany about noon and found a fine luncheon 
prepared for us. mainly influenced by Mrs. Mary Pruyn, the 
mother of our adjutant. We were served by Albany ladies and 
lf was a well-handled and enjoyable affair. 

V\ e crossed the Hudson to Greenbush (now Rensselaer) to 






22 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

entrain for New York. The cars provided were quite all cattle 
cars with evidence of their late occupancy. "We came to Albany 
as freight and are leaving as live stock," was the way some voiced 
our indignation — but later on we often fared worse without a 
grumble. 

We reached New York near midnight, September 2, and marched 
from the old 30th Street Station to City Hall Park. It was a 
bright moonlight night and as nearly all of us had never been in 
New York, our march was quiet and interesting. 

City Hall Park had the shape of a flatiron and was surrounded 
by a high iron fence. The Post-office Building was not then 
in existence. Cheap, temporary barracks were built across 
the wide upper end, arranged with bunks, and these were our 
"hotel." Being tired enough we slept soundly until the morning 
noise of the streets awakened us which it did early. 

I was detailed as Officer of the Guard and had a lively job. 
Most of our officers had leave, and while every man eagerly 
desired the same privilege, but few obtained it. The iron fence 
all around was crowded by the men on the inside and all sorts 
of hucksters on the outside intent on traffic with the insiders. 
Cast-iron knives of vicious size, inscribed "Death to Rebels" 
and a variety of sanguinary epithets, cheap pistols and all sorts 
of things, including fruit and other eatables, were displayed to 
tempt purchase. Woe, however, to any huckster so careless as 
to pass anything through the fence without pay in advance, for 
in most cases it was not returned nor paid for. This sort of 
stealing became so general that a police captain came to me 
with complaints. I said to him that while we occupied the 
Park it was a United States reservation in which he had no 
authority and could make no arrests or search for alleged stolen 
property. "Go outside," I said, "and warn these hucksters, or 
order them off the sidewalks." He and his men did this and 
opportunity for this petty pilfering largely ceased. 

Thus early did the disregard of small private property rights, 
which "afflicted" soldiers, manifest itself. 

About half past one of that afternoon the band of Barnum's 
Museum appeared on the balcony of that notable show place, 
just across the street from us. We country-fellows knew much 
of Barnum's Museum by reputation and yearned to see its 
inside for ourselves. 

Tom Thumb was one of the then leading features of that show 
and his diminutive coach and ponies, out for advertising, came 
down the sidewalk on the east side of our enclosure and our men 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT _ 23 

massed themselves against the iron fence to get a glimpse of the 
coach and followed it in pellmell fashion as it proceeded towards 
the narrow point of the park. The men reached the gates in a 
mass and overran the guard, those in front being forced through 
the gate by the pressing crowd behind. Before our reserve guard 
could be used, a blue streak of men headed for the museum, to 
the holding up of the large traffic of that vicinity. 

Of the more than a thousand men of the regiment, but two or 
three hundred remained where they belonged. I decided that it 
would be useless to pursue the "got-aways" and would await 
results. We were to leave at about four p.m. to take a steamer 
at the Battery for Perth Amboy and there entrain for Camden. 
When the Colonel returned he was "hot" at first, but had to 
laugh when the matter was explained. I 

Some of the men did not go to the Museum, btit went about 
seeing the sights and returned within a couple of hours. 

At five p.m. we sounded the "assembly" with bugles and drum ' 
corps and our men began to return. Later we formed up for out- 
march to the Battery and, calling the roll by companies, found 
some sixty men still absent. The police department was notified 
and instructed to make arrests and forward to Philadelphia. 

We went down Broadway to the steamer 'mid a shouting side- 
walk multitude, and before our steamer sailed at seven p.m. quite 
a number more of our absent men joined us. 

We reached Camden in the morning and crossed the Delaware 
to Philadelphia; the people were happy to see us, for now the 
invasion of Pennsylvania bv the enemv was almost a fact. 

We had breakfast at the famous "Cooper Shop" which all 
through the war was ready to feed every soldier passing through 
that city, and fed them well. The tables were served by relays 
of Philadelphia ladies and they showed a kindly interest in their 
service. It was maintained at large cost, but it was a larjre and 
appreciated blessing. No soldier who shared the "Cooper Shop" 
hospitality ever forgot it. 

All of our men "lost" in New York were brought to us at 
Philadelphia by New York police, except three or four. One of 
these reached us later, but the others we never saw again. 

After our excellent breakfast we marched some distance to a 
railroad siding and waited for a train to be made up, and as many 
i'^-dments were en route, cars were scarce and we waited some 
hours. 

While waiting, an enthusiastic man came with a one-horse dray- 
load of watermelons as a gift to the regiment. He was received 



• 



24 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

with cheers. The melons were devoured in a short time, some 
getting more and others less. It was after a hearty breakfast on 
a hot day. and it was not long before a large "misery" developed 
inside many of the eaters. If we had not been "green" officers 
the feast would not have been permitted. Many doubled up with 
pain; many pale and vomiting. It was a "melon-colic'' condition 
and kept our surgeons busy. In fact we had to send some of our 
men to a hospital and leave them. We wondered afterwards 
whether the donor of the melons might not have been a Con- 
federate emissary who put in this vicious work on us! 

We left about noon on a train consisting mostly of platform cars 
which kept us watchful lest careless men should fall off, but we 
traveled very slowly. There were many halts en route and there 
was fear of trouble for us in Baltimore, where the northward 
march of Lee greatly excited the large non-union element of that 
city. As yet we were unarmed, expecting to get our guns and 
accouterments at Baltimore. We passed through Wilmington 
without demonstration, except from the colored people who shouted 
all sorts of "God bless you ns." We reached Baltimore after 
dark and had quite a long march through the city to the Baltimore 
and Ohio station. 

We were ordered to make no utterances and pay no attention 
to the utterances of others. We heard distinct hisses from behind 
many a window-shutter and reaching the business section found 
crowds of excited people indulging in all sorts of shouts of derision 
and threats, mingled with occasional friendly salutations. 

At one corner the crowd was more dense. A man standing at 
the entrance of a building, some steps up from the street, called 
out, "What regiment is this?" "One hundred and eighteenth 
New York," was the reply. He belched forth in a loud voice, 
"One hundred and eighteenth New York! think of that, you Con- 
federate rooters! One hundred and eighteen regiments from just 
one state, and more coming! Bully, boys; I'm glad to see you." 

This called for all sorts of angry, vituperative shouts. "The 
more Northern scum the more fertilizer for Southern cotton fields " : 
" Better stop here and surrender to Lee, he'll be here in a few days," 
etc., etc. The excitement was threatening and it seemed as it 
we might be attacked, but we reached the station unmolested. 

We reported to General Wool, in command at Baltimore, and 
were ordered to entrain for Harper's Ferry speedily. But we had 
not received our arms and there were only a few cars available, 
so man}- had been required for forwarding regiments previously 
arrived. We hung about the station in the streets, very tired, 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 25 

and one after another dropped down on the sidewalks, and else- 
where, and slept. I slept on the sidewalk and slept well. 

Morning came and still we had not received our arms nor had 
any train been made up for our transportation. That forenoon 
we received Enfield rifles and accouterments, our tents and camp 
equipage, and our orders were, fortunately, changed — very 
fortunately for us. 

Late p.m. we took train for the Relay House, some ten miles 
from Baltimore, to guard the Thomas Viaduct at that place 
and the Baltimore and Ohio railroad in that vicinity.* This is 
the junction of Washington and Harper's Ferry trains and being 
the only railroad reaching Washington from the North, it was 
important to protect it against cavalry or other raids of the 
enemy. 

We reached our destination about sundown and camped just 
beyond the Viaduct, on a grassy hillside and slept that night 
in the open air, which was no hardship. We named our 
camp "Camp Wool, near Relay House, Afd." in honor of the 
general commanding. 

The next morning we commenced laying out camp and putting 
up tents, and being our first experience it was a slow process. 
Drilling was at once commenced by squads and companies and 
later in regimental maneuvers. 

A few nights later, about midnight, the long roll sounded in 
our camp and we could hear it sounding in the camp of another 
regiment not far away, and as every one of us seriously believed 
that we would right away meet the enemy we experienced 
"emotions" natural to our inexperience. We had two or three 
citizens in camp, friends of some of our men who had come on 
with us, and laughable stories were told of the handing over of 
watches, money and other valuables to these citizens against our 
possible fate. 

The regiment was promptly in line, our field and staff officers 
mounted and ready for further orders. It was a fine moonlight 
fright and silence prevailed, for we were in solemn mood. After 
waiting some time, one Flynn, of our company, a jolly young 
Irishman, said in good voice: "Colonel, I'd loik to spake wid yer." 
" All right, my man," replied the Colonel, "speak out." " Colonel, 
^ ye don't moind, I'd loik to stay in camp and lose me time 
to-night!" 

* The Thomas Viaduct over the Patapsco has eight arches, each of 58 feet 
span. In its day it was the largest in the United States and regarded as a 
r ' inarkable endueerinjj: feat. 



26 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

This ludicrous proposal provoked laughter and broke the 
solemnity. Conversation ensued and we forgot what we feared ■ — 
and that was Flynn's cunning purpose. 

A half-hour later a staff officer arrived, announcing "False 
alarm." We broke ranks and went to our tents too happy to 
readily resume sleep. 

A few of our men loudly professed regret that there was " noth- 
ing doing " ; but we afterward learned that there were soldiers whose 
appetite for fight was greatly developed when danger of it had 
passed. 

After a few days we moved camp to the other side of the Viaduct 
on high ground in an apple orchard in rear of the Relay House 
Station. 

One morning the Colonel sent for me and showed me a com- 
munication from General Wool, ordering our Colonel to detail a 
competent officer to act with a named captain of artillery in locat- 
ing his battery for best protection of the Viaduct, and also lay- 
out a line of rifle pits and other defensive fortifications. The 
Colonel said, "We have no officer who knows anything about 
artillery or engineering, but you must try it." I met the artillery 
captain with some reluctance until I found that he knew as little 
as I did about the matter; but together we selected the battery 
location and laid out the defensive works, all of which were ap- 
proved later by an officer of General Wool's staff. From after 
experience I know that so far as the rifle pits and earthworks 
were concerned, it was a mighty poor sort of an amateur job. 

We drilled industriously and did guard duty with decided fidelity 
and with more particularity than we did later on; the enemy was 
not far from us and we obeyed every technicality. 

Harper's Ferry was taken, our force there surrendering, and 
had we gone to Harper's Ferry from Baltimore, as first ordered, 
w r e would have been unfortunate paroled prisoners of war. It was 
our good luck to have it otherwise. 

Train loads of these paroled prisoners began to arrive en route 
to Parole Camp Douglas, Chicago. The 115th New York just 
preceded our arrival in Baltimore and going to Harper's Ferry 
they had but a brief service before their surrender. I was at the 
Relay Station when this regiment arrived en route to Chicago. 
Some were happy that they were going back north; but most of 
them were sorrowful enough over their short inglorious military 
experience. They had had very little drill and were "raw material " 
to be sent to the front so soon. 

The body of General Miles came with this regiment. He was 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 27 

in command at Harper's Ferry and was killed before the enemy's 
fire ceased after his surrender. The box containing his body 
was on a baggage truck at the station and Chaplain Clements 
of the regiment (115th N. Y.), afterwards a resident of Warren 
County, struck the box with his fist, exclaiming: "Here are the 
mortal remains of a traitor !" An officer of General Miles' staff 
who had the body in charge, called the Chaplain to account for 
his language, and a rough and tumble fight seemed imminent; 
but the Chaplain stood his ground, saying more and worse, and 
being much larger than the staff officer was not attacked. Any- 
how, the engine whistle blew and the train moved on. I think- 
that the worst that can be charged against General Miles was 
incompetency. 

The two days' bloody battle of Antietam was fought within 
our hearing of its guns, Lee's invasion was turned back and the 
danger of a present raid upon the Baltimore and Ohio was im- 
probable. However, the importance of the Viaduct and the 
road was such that our guarding was continued. 

A train load of Confederate prisoners came from Antietam, 
and as all trains stopped at Relay Station, we were interested in 
the personality of these men. We rendered them any kindness 
we could and concluded that they were not to be despised as 
armed enemies. Our pickets brought in a few straggling prisoners, 
and they were curiosities. They had the best we could give them, 
till they were sent on to Baltimore. 

September 2^, 1862. President Lincoln's Emancipation Proc- 
lamation was read to our regiment at dress parade this evening, 
and while most of us recognized its importance and wonderful 
significance, many objected because it made the war one against 
slavery and they were "not fighting for the 'niggers/ but for the 
Union," and there was much discussion and some dissention for 
a while. One soldier said, "That proclamation completes our 
Declaration of Independence; puts honesty into our professions 
of liberty." 

When the proclamation was read I was so ill that T could hardly 
stand and that night our surgeon said I had typhoid fever. There 
were many cases of it in the regiment, and many were in hospital 
from this and other troubles, and some had died. 

We had been doing guard duty in all kinds of weather, often 
standing in water which gathered in the grave-like trenches; 
had drilled in the hot sun, and not being "seasoned" to camp or 
climate, it was a wonder that there was not more sickness — but 
there was enough. 



28 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

My fever developed rapidly and before morning I became 
delirious and continued so for many days. A kind family at Elk 
Ridge Landing, about a mile from camp, took me in with my 
soldier nurses, or rather watchers, and I remained there during 
my serious illness and slow convalescence. My delusions were 
more real to me and better, remembered than anything real during 
my illness. 

I was obsessed with the belief that T was the victim of a con- 
spiracy of my fellow officers to have me shot for some trumped- 
up military offense — that, in fact, I was under sentence of death 
and in prison awaiting execution. That my windows had iron 
bars was to me a visible fact, for I could see even the rivets where 
the bars crossed. The officers who called were treated coldly 
and I accused them of their supposed treachery. Every night 
I knew that the ceiling of my room was forced down to smother 
me and piteously pleaded for relief. All contradictions of my 
delusions had no influence, for I knew what I could see for myself, 
which taught me the fallacy of arguing with a crazy man. 

One night I thought I heard our regimental band approaching 
and believed preparations for my execution were being made. My 
cunning purpose was to cheat them of what I considered would 
be their great satisfaction in seeing me shot to death. 

Suicide was the way to do it! My military chest was in the 
room and in it were two pistols. The key to the chest was in my 
trousers' pocket, the trousers hanging in the room. But there 
were my two watchers, whom I considered as guards. I began 
telling them how much better I felt, that it was unnecessary for 
them to watch, and I really persuaded them to lie down and get 
some rest. When I was sure they were asleep, I got out of bed, 
got the key, unlocked the chest and secured one of my revolvers 
and into bed again. My plan now was to shoot myself when I 
was taken from my supposed prison, out before the regiment, 
and I gloried in the thought of the chagrin and disappointment 
my act would occasion — thought it would be grandly dramatic! 

My effort so tired me that I fell into a brief sleep and when I 
awakened I could not find my revolver. I was shocked at my 
failure, and, as never before or since, did the saying "Procrastina- 
tion is the thief of time" seem so veritable. I quickly determined 
to get my other revolver and not wait a moment in using it. 

I got up again, but I couldn't find the key to my chest, and the 
mystery is, it never was found. To break open the chest would 
awaken my "guard'' and I felt a deep humiliation and disappoint- 
ment at being foiled in my purpose. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 29 



I then resolved to escape and went down the stairs to the main 
floor of the dwelling and found the doors locked; down another 
stairway to a half-basement where I found the door barred, but 
I could and did remove the bar and going up a few steps was out 
in the open. It was raining and as I had on only my night dress 
the rain cooled my fever and sanity returned. I was then so 
weak that I couldn't stand, much less walk. 

The day was breaking and I could hear the reveille sounding 
in our distant camp. I crawled back to the doorway and fell 
down the few steps against the door. The daughter of my host 
occupied a room above this half-basement door and hearing noise 
looked out of her window and thought she saw me. She went 
at once and awakened my watchers, inquiring if I were there. 
They said, " Yes," but quickly discovered otherwise. They found 
me and carried me to my room and sent for our surgeon, Dr. 
Moore, who soon arrived. I heard him say, "I don't believe he'll 
live till noon," which had no disturbing effect upon me, for I 
felt nearly dead already. My fever returned and my delirium, 
and for a few days I just hovered between the here and the here- 
after, until improvement began and continued. The pistol was 
found in my bed. In my brief sleep it had slipped beyond my 
reach. It was also found that while I was outside the house, I 
had walked around an uncurbed well, into which I might have 
fallen, so I considered that I was providentially cared for. 

My delirium was a succession of horrors of various sorts, and 
of those things I still have distinct recollection — they seem a 
part of my actual experience. 

One of my watchers was afterwards physician to Auburn Prison, 
Dr. Sawyer. After this episode Mr. Braman of our company 
(afterwards Rev. E. A. Braman) was sent to me, and he remained 
during my convalescence rendering such kindly and helpful 
ministration as I shall never forget. 

During my illness one of our men while guarding the railroad 
accidentally shot the engineer of a freight train. Our men were 
scattered along the road in "bunches" of four or more, the groups 
being within sight of each other, one man to be on watch all the 
v.liile, and when a train approached he called out all the group, 
they to stand at present anus till the train passed. On the coming 
of this train the guard was called out and in hurrying into position 
the gun of one man, Eugene Dupuis of our company, was acciden- 
tally discharged. The bullet struck the smokestack of the engine, 
glanced and hit the engineer in his forehead, killing him instantly. 
The fireman ran the train to the Relay Station. Dupuis was 



> 



30 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

arrested, turned over to the civil authorities and imprisoned at 
Baltimore to await trial. 

The accident was sincerely lamented by the regiment. A delega- 
tion of our officers attended the engineer's funeral in Baltimore, 
and a considerable purse was contributed .by the regiment to his 
family. 

The Baltimore papers so exaggeratedly misrepresented the 
accident as a deliberate murder and so magnified the possible 
consequences of a passenger train, which followed the freight, 
running into the freight, except for the chance ability of the fire- 
man to handle the freight engine, that our regiment was ordered 
away. 

It went to Fort Ethan Allen, just across the Potomac above , 
Washington. I was left recovering from my illness, a mere skeleton 
of my former and after self. When I fully recovered I had gained 
ten or more pounds over even my previous well-weight and after- 
wards had more robust health than before my illness. 

When I was able to get around, Mr. Dapuis' brother, bookkeeper 
for Witherbee, Sherman & Company of Port Henry, X. Y., came 
down and I went with him to Baltimore. We visited his brother 
in prison and I assisted in preparing for his trial. One of Balti- 
more's best lawyers, Mr. Latrobe, afterwards mayor of his city, 
was engaged for the defense, and the following March I was de- 
tailed by the War Department to attend and assist in the trial, 
our regiment then being in Washington. The trial took place at 
Ellicott's Mills, count-v seat of Ellicott Count v. Maryland, above 
the Relay House on the road to Harper's Ferry. Lieutenant 
Stevenson, a townsman and friend of Dapuis', went with me. 
On motion I was recognized as a member of the bar of another I 
state and assisted in the trial in a small way. 

Common law practice obtained in Maryland, and when Dupui? 
was arraigned his indictment was read in all the extravagant 
language of the common law article. He was charged with ''malice 
prepense," " being instigated fey the devil," ''with felonious 
intent," "with divers weapons," etc. After the reading of the 
indictment Lieutenant Stevenson came to me with blanched 
face and whispered, "My God! they are bound to hang Gene. 
aren't they?" 

No wonder that he thought so in the, to him, awful conventional 
language of the indictment. To say the least, there was no sympa- 
thy for a Union soldier in that vicinity; but Judge Brewer of 
Annapolis was the trial judge and he was well known for his 
uncompromising Union sentiments. He had at times held court 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 31 



with his revolver handy, for he had been threatened for his strong 
Union utterances and conduct. Pie was quite old and looked 
feeble, but his eyes, manner and speech indicated force and firm- 
ness. Apparently he gave very little attention to the trial, which 
was an all-day affair. 

I found that one of the jury had served as a three-months-man 
in the Federal Army, a fact known there only to a confidential 
friend of his who was my informant. 

The State's Attorney made the closing plea, and he indulged in 
florid rhetoric and oratorv and decidedly enlisted the attention 
and interest of the jurors. He closed with a personal appeal to 
the jury, asking if it was possible that any individual of the panel 
doubted the prisoner's guilt. "Do you, sir?" he asked, confront- 
ing and pointing his finger at the first juror, and so on to each 
juror until, reaching the ex-Union soldier, this juror arose and 
said: ''Well, sir, I have right smart doubts!" This man had 
never served on a jury before and supposed the State's Attorney 
was calling for the verdict. His "prematurity" made a sensation 
and there was some discussion as to discharging the jury and having 
a new trial; but the Judge decided to reprimand the "too-soon" 
juror and proceed. The incident, however, had a "damper" 
effect on the State Attorney's oratory. 

Judge Brew r er charged the jury briefly, but strongly in favor of 
the prisoner, for there was no proof of intent or purpose to kill. 
The jury was out some time, coming in with a verdict of man- 
slaughter in the third degree. 

The Judge was plainly irritated by the verdict. He asked the 
prisoner to stand up and said to him in substance: "The court is 
surprised at this verdict and does not think it is justified; but 
you stand before the court as found guilty of manslaughter in 
the third degree, and it becomes my duty to pronounce sentence, 
which will be the minimum permitted by law; that is, to be con- 
fined for the period of one year in the penitentiary of this state. 
Having pronounced your sentence I have this to say: If some one 
representing you will accompany me to Annapolis to-morrow, 
I will go with him to our Governor and join in asking him to 
pardon you." 

With the consent of the State's Attorney the jurors signed a 
petition for Dupuis' pardon and I went with Judge Brewer to 
Annapolis and saw Governor Bradford. The law required that 
an appeal for pardon should be advertised for six weeks, and the 
Governor said that if no protest came he saw no reason why he" 
■ v hould not then favorably consider the matter. He did pardon 
him and Dupuis rejoined his regiment. 



i 



32 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

To go back; during my slow convalescence at Elk Ridge Land- 
ing I received many kindnesses from the people there, especially 
from the young women who came to see me, bringing flowers, 
fruit, etc., sometimes remaining for hours — quite entertainingly. 
They were quite sure, however, to have it more or less mildly 
understood that their sympathy was with me personally in my 
" lonely invalidism" and not as a Federal soldier — but they 
were cordial and friendly. 

The Jeffers family, who so kindly "took me in," rendered un- 
forgettable kindness of large quantity and fine quality and almost 
refused compensation. 

When able to get about without help, I several times visited 
the Post Hospital, about a mile distant, where several of our men 
were seriously ill. On October 15, 1862, Private Lewis Sprague 
of Company E was buried at Elk Ridge Landing and I was present. 

On October 23, La Rehtte L. Thompson of our company and 
Sylvanus H. Smith of Company G died. These were fine young 
men and promising soldiers. 

On November 1, Corporal Wright of our company died. Others 
died, but I have no memoranda of their names. 

Writing to the families of these boys was a sad duty and gave 
me my first consciousness of the strain and pain and anxiety in 
the Northern homes of our soldiers and the home and heart sorrow 
occasioned by the death of their loved ones — loved the more 
for the manliness of their sacrifice service. Every death in hospital 
or on battle field, every soldier's illness, or wound, caused pain 
and grief to kith and kin and friends at home. The suffering and 
horrors of war were by no means limited to the experience of the 
soldiers, but were multiplied in distant hearts and homes; multi- 
plied by the sum of all who loved them. 

After five weeks of sickness and convalescence, on November 10. 
1862, with a few convalescents from the local field hospital, I 
sta rted to join my regiment, arriving at Washington in the after- 
noon. The dome of the capitol building was in process of construc- 
tion, and its scaffolding and skeleton iron frame I thought sort of 
symbolized the broken-up condition of the nation. 

We walked to Georgetown expecting to take a canal packet 
for Chain Bridge, but found the last packet for the day had left. 
We were too tired and weak to undertake the "hike," and having 
very little money among us we "negotiated" for sleeping privileges 
on the floor of a cheap dwelling for the night, at a price within 
our combined scanty means. 

In the morning we reached Chain Bridge and from there 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 33 

" hiked" on to Fort Ethan Allen, a mile or more, where our regi- 
ment was encamped. It was a great pleasure to meet comrades, 
mingle with them and exchange experiences — it was a bit like 
getting home. 

The camp was well located, had good drainage, and was in fine 
condition, showing that a large amount of work had been done in 
making it sanitary and comfortable. 

An elaborate system of fortifications was being completed in 
that vicinity, which included forts Ethan Allen and Marey, with 
connecting works: redans, redoubts, etc. 

Other regiments were encamped about us, including the 127th 
Pennsylvania, 24th and 28th New Jersey, 27th Connecticut, 
152d and 169th New York and 4th New York Artillery. All but 
the last three left a few days after my return. These three re- 
maining regiments with ours were formed into a Provisional 
Brigade, commanded by Colonel Buell of the 169th New York. 

General Abercrombie, with headquarters at Arlington, General 
Robert E. Lee's homestead, commanded the forces of the vicinity. 

As we had not been paid for three months, our officers were very 
short of money, many without any. While our men were supplied 
with rations, officers had to provide their own "feed," and that 
took cash. We could get some things from the commissary 
'''on tick," and for a time — it seemed a longtime — Company F 
officers — Captain Livingston, 2d Lieutenant Stevenson, and 
myself — subsisted on bread and molasses. The bread was good, 
the molasses sweet and our appetites hearty, so we were happy 
and "waxed fat." Sometimes we toasted or fried the bread or 
made bread pudding for a change, making a fairly pleasant 
diversion in our menu. 

Our sutler, Lot Chamberlain, was a character. He had been 
sheriff of Clinton County, a captain of passenger steamers on Lake 
Champlain (which in that day was an important position), and was 
sociable, zestful and popular. He brought a man to camp from 
Washington who, with professed pity for our need, proposed 
to advance what was due for a certain per cent discount. While 
some of us felt that he was in league with and a speculating fore- 
runner of the Paymaster, and that his generous (?) offer indicated 
that the Paymaster would soon arrive, many accepted his offer. 
I refused to discount my pay and continued my bread and treacle 
diet for a few days longer, when the Paymaster arrived. Lot 
Chamberlain afterwards became a Paymaster in the army, him- 
self, and had a sorry experience. 

While camp, fatigue and picket duty was rather persistent 



34 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

and drill continuous, we really had a pleasant and happy ex- 
perience at our "Camp near Fort Ethan Allen, Ya.," as our camp 
was named. 

An Officers' School was established and did much in fitting us 
for our duties. I think, too, that our stay .here was the longest 
in any one camp of the regiment's three years' experience. 

For an idea of our daily doings I will copy my diary for a period 
with its more or less frequent entries: 

November 15, 1862. Detailed in command of fatigue party of 
270 men, 3 lieutenants, 10 sergeants and 20 corporals. Worked 
on Fort Ethan Allen. General Abercrombie and part of his start 
visited us, making some inquiries pleasantly and watched our 
work for a half-hour. 

November 16-18. Too cold for any but necessary camp work 
and picket. 

November 20. On fatigue with company till noon at battery 
near Fort Marcy. Afternoon, cold rain and returned to camp 
quite wet and "shivery." 

November 22, Sunday. Regimental inspection and Divine 
service by Chaplain Hagar, with vesper prayer service in the 
evening. 

November 24- On fatigue at Fort Marcy raising redan and gun- 
beds. 

November 25. Am officer of the guard. Captain Livingston is 
officer of the day. 

The following is reported of a certain Colonel, who, for sani- 
tary reasons, ordered his men to change their shirts every week. 
Being told that many of the men had but one shirt, he said: 
" My order must be obeyed just the same. Make these men 
change shirts with each other.'' 

November 27. Thanksgiving Day. Fine and warm. Religious 
service by Chaplain. For dinner had bread, salt beef, fried bread, 
pickles, coffee, cheese and more bread, with bread and molasses 
for dessert — happy and thankful. 

November 28. On fatigue with four companies at outworks 
near Fort Marcy. Hon. Orlando Kellogg visited us. 

November 29. Acted as regimental adjutant. 

December 2. Cold but sunshiny. With four companies went 
to outworks of Fort Marcy to finish a battery. 

pecember 5. In command of a fatigue battalion. Cold and 
snowing. Was told to-day the incident of a colonel of a short- 
term regiment serving earlier in the war, who influenced by many 
of his men leaving camp without leave, by his natural importance 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 35 

and an overdose of "liquid courage/' issued this order: "Any 
officer or man of this regiment leaving camp without written 
permission shall be shot at once." Being called upon to explain 
his severe order, he said the omission of a comma in writing the 
order made it seem more severe than intended; that the last part 
should read, "shot at, once" — just shot at, not to hit, and but 
once at that! 

December 6. Snow two inches deep. Attended officers' school. 
Freezing temperature. In officers' school it was asked, "What is 
strategy?" One answer was, "When in action and your ammuni- 
tion gives out it would be strategy to keep on firing and thus 

deceive the enemy." 1^S7^1^Q 

December 8. Clear and cold". On pfcTSWnth four companies, 
stationed on cross-road leading from Leesburg Pike to Fallsburg 
Church. "Shivery" and disagreeably uncomfortable. Just 
beyond our picket line is an old mansion which before the war 
must have been a stately home; but the war and camps have 
wrought ruin of grounds, trees, shrubbery, fences and surroundings. 
In spite of the devastation the owner and his daughter are living 
there. He is a fine old gentleman. He called at our picket head- 
quarters a few days ago and invited us to return the call. Lieu- 
tenant Biggs and myself did call this evening and had a pleasant 
hour. We found that he had been an intimate young friend of 
President Jackson and he entertained us with reminiscences of 
"Old Hickory." His daughter sang for us, accompanying herself 
on a piano which needed tuning. She has a fairly good voice and 
is attractive in person and manner. They invited us to call at any 
time as they had lonesome lives. The father wished to stay in 
the old home and the daughter considered it her duty to remain 
with him. Their affection for each other was manifestly delightful. 

December 9-10. Still on picket, but weather more to our liking. 

December 11. In from picket this morning and the company 
is excused from further duty for the day. I was told this evening 
of a good soldier of Irish accent in one of our regiments who was 
in the battle of Bull Run and ran with the runners on that in- 
glorious occasion. Being "jollied" about it, he philosophically 
replied: "Be gorra, thim as didn't run from Bull Run are down 
there yit!" * 

* I havo seen it stated that General John A. Logan commenced his military 
career while he was yet in Congress by being in or at the Bull Run. battle 
and participating in the raec hack to Washington. Reaching there, a friend 
expressed surprise that he was back so soon and asked how he did it. "Were 
the trains running?" "No," replied Logan, "'but every other d — d thing 
w-s.*' 



36 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

December 12. Out with a fatigue detail working on the en- 
trenchments. Have news of the occupation of Fredericksburgh 
by the Army of the Potomac. 

December 15. Went out beyond our picket line to-day with a 
foraging detail. Went to Lewelensville, Bailey's Cross Roads. 
Langley's, etc. Hard march, but met no armed enemy and found 
poor foraging. 

December 16. After morning drill Lieutenant Riggs, Carter 
and myself walked to Washington, by way of Arlington House 
headquarters, to. have our passes approved. Went to Ford's 
Theater and heard the opera of Satanella with Miss Ritehings 
as prima donna. Several distinguished military and civil officers 
were in the audience. 

December 17. With fatigue detail working on Fort Marcy. 

December 18. In camp making up company clothing accounts. 

December 19. Same as yesterday. 

December 20. Am officer of the day. 

December 21. Sunday. Usual inspection, and service in chapel, 
tent. Our first sergeant reported that one of our men, a good- 
natured Irishman, had the habit of being the last man in line at 
roll call. I said to the man that a straggling response to roll call 
did not look like good discipline and I would expect promptness 
from him in future. I watched the roll call to-night and at the 
first sound of the bugle this man sprang to the company street. 
He saw me and perpetrated these remarks: "The last is first 
to-night; I've always been behoind before. In being behoind- 
hand I've bin yer ladin' man." 

December 22. On picket up the Potomac to the right of Lang- 
ley's with three companies — ours and one each from the 152d 
and 169th X. Y. We cover a line of about two miles. 

December 24. Returned to-night from two days' picket duty. 
The weather has been so fine that there was no hardship in this 
outpost service. We rather enjoyed it. 

'Tis Christmas eve with "taps" deferred for an hour to give the 
men a longer evening. Many packages of good things have 
been received from home-folks, and in a stroll through and around 
camp I find the boys decidedly merry — for all are boys to-night. 

In one tent Christmas carols were being " executed," and in 
another a strong voice was wrestling with Luther's battle hymn, 
"A mighty fortress is our God." 

At the chapel tent a prayer meeting was in progress and I 
went in. The XCI Psalm, the soldiers' favorite, was read; there 
were fervent short prayers, hearty singing with "Rock of Ages" 
for a benediction. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 37 

Afterwards I sat for a while on a stump outside our camp 
and heard singing of hymns in other nearby camps, bringing 
to mind the ''Song of the Angels'' to the Bethlehem shepherds, 
that glorious anthem, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth 
peace, good will to men." 

I wondered when this "peace on earth" would come to stay, 
and concluded that it could not come until that all-inclusive 
petition, "Thy will be done on earth," is fulfilled. Till then it 
must be expected that swords and spears, or their modern equiva- 
lents, will be as necessary as plowshares and pruninghooks. 

We are fighting for peace now and it will have to be fought 
for through years to come — war to end war. It may be centuries 
distant, but this world's acceptance of the Divine Will with 
"peace on earth" as its fruitage, is eighteen hundred years nearer 
than when first proclaimed. 

"These things have I spoken to you that in me ye may have 
peace," is the mediational message. 

December 25. Christmas! Beautiful day and "Merry Christ- 
inas" salutations abound. The 169th N. Y. is celebrating with 
all sorts of sports. The command of the regiment was turned over 
to the men for a couple of hours. The men elected temporary 
officers and pandemonium reigned. The real colonel was put 
under arrest, and some of the other officers were put in the guard 
house. It was a hilarious time with various funny "stunts." 
Several of our officers combined to have a Christmas dinner and 
succeeded beautifully — turkey, chicken, etc. It was an unusual 
and satisfactory menu, for soldiers. 

December 26. My company on guard, but I was detailed in 
command of a fatigue battalion, working on a battery back of the 
4th Artillery Camp. Have done so much fatigue work on forts, 
batteries and rifle pits that I am coming to be a halfway sort of 
military engineer or boss ditch-digger - — am getting my share 
of this sort. 

December 27. This morning one of our company failed to 
appear at reveille "turn out.'' Going to his tent found him asleep. 
Awakening and admonishing him, he defended himself by reciting 
John G. Saxe's humorous satire "On Early Rising." He did it 
so cleverly that I listened and condoned his delinquency. 

It reminded me that I had seen and met this Vermont poet. 
I once attended the Commencement Exercises of the University 
of Vermont at Burlington. At the beginning of the program 
'hore were on the platform, with the faculty and others, the 
Governor of the state, two or three ex-Governors and John G. 



38 THREE YEARS WITH THE 



Saxe, who was then the Democratic candidate for Governor, 
which only amounted to a compliment in that overwhelming!}- 
Republican State. 

The College President in opening the exercises expressed his 
pleasure in having the Governor and ex-Governors present, and 
turning to Mr. Saxe said: "We are also pleased to have Mr. Saxe' 
with us; but I fear that our people will consider him too young 
for governor." Mr. Saxe immediately arose and said that he did 
not wish to have his political chances discounted by being declared 
too young. "I assure you/' he said, "that Til be old enough 
when I'm elected." His quick wit was applauded. 

Some time later I heard another of Mr. Saxe's witticisms. On 
a Lake Champlain steamer going north an attractive and lively 
young lady passenger was introduced to Mr. Saxe, who was 
also, like myself, a passenger, and from that on until she reached 
her landing they continued together in vivacious conversation. 
Arriving at the young lady's destination Mr. Saxe gallantly 
accompanied her to the gangplank with profuse expressions of 
his pleasure in meeting her and that it would lastingly remain a 
delightful memory. "Oh, Mr. Saxe," said the miss, "you are an 
accomplished flatterer. You will be forgetting me before you 
reach Burlington." "Worse than that," he replied; "I assure 
you that were 1 not married I'd be for getting you right now." 

In camp working on company muster rolls. Last evening 
the Officer of the Day in passing a tent wherein several soldiers 
were gathered and were rather noisy called to them from outside 
to make less noise. "Who are you?" they asked anei he replied: 
"You'll find out if you don't simmer down." The men thought 
he was some joker and the noise continued. The officer returned 
and entered the tent, saying, "Don't you know enough to obey 
your superior officer?" "Beg your pardon, sir," said one of the 
men, saluting; " would have obeyed instantly if you'd had shoulder 
straps on your voice." 

December 2S. Sunday. Usual inspection, chapel service, dress 
parade, etc. Our Chaplain gave us a good talk. He is more than 
a "Sunday man," is busy in making himself useful every day. 
Comforting the sick, writing their letters, cheering the discouraged 
and "home-sickers," caring for our mail and giving much of willing 
anel needed service. 

December 29. The long roll sounded an alarm at midnight 
last night. We "turned out" and occupied the rifle pits till 
morning. A cold night, tedious watching and waiting. Have 
not learned the cause of the alarm — perhaps it was given for 



i 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 39 

practice. While in the trenches a Company D man accidentally 
discharged his gun and killed a comrade, James Hews, the first 
death from gun-shot in our regiment and a sad case. 

December SO. Out on picket on the Leesburg Pike. Lieutenant 
Riggs and myself called again this evening on the "Man and the 
Maid in the Mansion/' It was a pleasant couple of hours for 
all of us; for they seemed as happy as we. Before the war the 
mansion had housed gay parties of distinguished people. In 
spite of their hospitable cheerfulness, trembling voices and dim- 
ming eyes were observable as they mentioned incidents of their 
former social life ■ — and no wonder! We admired and pitied them. 
We brought with us sugar and coffee, for w T hich they were grateful. 

December SI. Am to-day ending the year in command of the 
vidette picket and scout station at Langley's. 

Thus varied were the days of our life, weather having most 
to do with the question of whether the sendee was pleasant or 
otherwise. Rain or snow or cold was trying, especially on picket. 
In camp most of our tents had sheet iron stoves or small open fires. 
Captain Livingston and I tented together and we had a comfort- 
able tent with an open fire, and during the long evenings had 
plenty of visitors. Captain Livingston was a college man, a 
i lawyer, an editor, a well read and entertaining gentleman. He 
could repeat Shakespeare, Byron and other poets and literaiy 
men; had a large knowledge of history and an excellent memory. 
So it was, that sitting by our fire with calling officer-friends, many 
an evening was delightfully spent in just enough conversation to 
keep the Captain, who was naturally reticent and modest, enter- 
taining us. He was a dear, lovable man; honest, sincere and 
patriotic. His white hair and beard and pink complexion added 
to the attractiveness of his genial manner. We all loved the "Old 
Captain'' and he deserved it. While not a disciplinarian, he took 
no liberties with military rules and regulations so far as they 
applied to himself. As to himself, he was a martinet. 

One morning when there were a few inches of damp snow on 
the ground there was much snow-balling, developing into a "tight' 7 
between companies and finally a "battle" between the companies 
of our right and left wings. The men called out their officers to 
join in the combat. In gathering the snow for balls they reached 
into the mud beneath until the balls often had in them more clay 
than snow. Many were seriously hurt, and two or three of my 
teeth were painfully loosened by a ball of mud reaching my face 
with decided velocity. The men wore their overcoats, using the 



40 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

capes for protecting their heads and faces, else the hurts would 
have been more and worse. As it was, a few went into hospital 
for repairs. It was only in sport, but it was rough. 

One of our "jobs" was felling the fine trees on the somewhat 
steep slope of the bank of the Potomac to give " sight''' and range 
for artillery. The method was to begin below, cut into the trees 
on their Potomac sides two-thirds, or more, of their diameter, 
always leaving enough to keep the trees standing. When the 
trees at the top of the slope were reached, it was carefully arranged 
to cut them through simultaneously so that for a wide space they 
would fall together upon those next below, already partly cut. 
breaking them down, and these upon those still below and so on 
down to the river. It was an interesting sight to see these trees 
for a considerable width progressively falling from the top to the 
bottom of the slope and hear the noise of the breaking of the 
uncut parts and the crash of breaking limbs, as if a cyclone was 
exercising its wrath. This was another feature of the wastefulness 
of war, the destroying of such quantities of timber. We used 
some of it for fuel and in "logging" up our tents. 

The company officers of the regiment furnished each of their 
men with two pairs of white cotton gloves for use on dress parade. 
These the men were to keep clean by washing when soiled. One 
evening, when inspecting our company for dress parade, one man 
did not have his gloves. He was the most careless and slovenly 
man in the company, notably so. He claimed to have lost his 
gloves. He was sent to the guard house during the parade and 
promised further humiliation if he did not have gloves for the 
next evening's parade. The following day he came to me with 
wet gloves on his hands, evidently having washed them and put 
them on his hands to dry. "Lieutenant," he said, " will these do? " 
"Certainly," I replied, "where did you find them?" "Well." 
he said, "I washed my hands and found they were there all the 
time!" 

On one occasion our Provisional Brigade, consisting of our 
regiment, the 152d and 169th X. Y, and the 4th Artillery, was 
reviewed by General Abercrombie on Mary's Hill and he pleased 
us by complimenting the 1 18th for soldierly appearance and drill. 

February 9, 1S63. With Lieutenants Riggs and Kellogg, visited 
Washington again, spending most of the day in the galleries of 
the Senate and House of Representatives. Had a short visit 
with Senator Ira Harris who was one of my.law school professors, 
and with our then Congressman, William A. Wheeler, afterwards 
Vice-President of the U. S. We were interested in seeing Sumner. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 41 

Sherman, Wilson, Chandler, King, Wade, Colfax, Valandingham 
and others notable then and afterwards in the history of the 
"Sixties." 

February 10. As our Quartermaster, DeLaney, has been made 
Brigade Quartermaster, I am detailed as Acting Quartermaster 
of our regiment, and ordered by the Chief Quartermaster, General 
Green, to report to him at Washington. It was for instructions 
and to advise that our regiment was complimented and favored 
by being selected for provost (^nty in Washington and that we 
could have as many wagons for the transportation of our baggage, 
camp equipage and property as I thought might be needed. I 
asked for forty four-mule teams. 

February 11. Last night our brigade was called to the rifle 
pits by an alarm from picket firing, which turned out to be a case 
of the pickets ''seeing things in the dark/' for it was a dark, rainy 
night. 

I might say of our picket duty here that there is little fear of 
an attack from the enemy in force. The danger is from spies, 
guerrillas, small scouting or raiding parties stealing upon us by 
night, and from individual " snipers" incited by the glory of killing 
a Yankee; so it really is an anxious, trying and nervous business, 
this standing out in the open of nights as targets. 

February 12. A drizzling, foggy morning but better in the 
afternoon. Our wagons arrived, our tents went down and loading 
began* Our fine camp was soon desolate; the only tent standing 
was that of the hospital, for there are some too ill to be moved. 
It really seemed like breaking up housekeeping. 

By ten o'clock a.m. we reached the Potomac and crossed Chain 
Bridge. Here the wagon train took the River road for George- 
town and the regiment took the Highland road, the train reaching 
< leorgetown first. 

Our Washington camp was about a mile north of the capitol, 
near Findley Hospital, in a pretty woods with a brook running 
'lirough. It was uneven ground, previously occupied by General 
Sprague's Rhode Island trooos. 

That night a cold storm of wind, sleet and snow made the camp 
an unpleasant "first night." 

Notwithstanding our many teams we had to leave much in 
( >ur old camp, especially lumber used for tent floors and other 
taings that would be useful in our new camp; so I went back in 
the morning with a dozen wagons to get these things. Our Chaplain 
decided to go with me and look after the sick left in the camp hospi- 
tal tent. We went to a hotel for the night and started early in 



42 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

the morning on horseback, and as we came to Chain Bridge the 
sentinel called out, "Turn out guard, General officer," and at 
once the whole guard was in line and presented arms, an honor 
due to the rank of general. While we returned the salute, wc 
were puzzled at the performance until, looking at the Chaplain's 
hat, it bore a star on its front, the insignia of a brigadier general, 
instead of the cross of a Chaplain! In coming from breakfast 
at the hotel he had mistaken a general's slouch hat for his own, 
being quite alike in appearance. He was deeply chagrined, bin 
turned the hat around so that the star wouldn't show, and we 
were not troubled with a turned-out guard at the other end of 
the bridge. 

On his return that night our Chaplain went to the hotel and 
found an irate General. In spite of Chaplain Hagar's apologies, 
the General swore at him, accusing him of a wish to sport in a 
general's hat, or of being too ignorant to recognize the insignia, 
etc. As a parting shot the Chaplain said, "I did discover that 
it was a general's hat, but I now find that it is not the hat of a 
gentleman." 

This general, who shall be nameless here, for he may have a 
sensitive posterity, had been around Washington so long that it 
was being talked about. One of the daily papers had referred 
to him and his "city warfare," not by name, but so as to be well 
understood who was meant. He was pompous and enjoyed his 
uniform and his comfort and safety. 

It was said that one morning a newsboy entered a Pennsylvania 
Avenue street car in which this general was riding, and shouted. 
"Morning Chronicle! Another big battle!" The general bought 
a paper and hastily glanced at its pages while the boy was selling 
to others. As the boy was leaving the car, our general shouted 
at him, "Here, you little rascal! I don't see any battle." "No," 
replied the boy vociferously, "and you never will while you hang 
'round Washington." The passengers more than giggled, to our 
general's discomfiture. 

When we reached our old camp that morning, we found that 
another regiment had arrived and camped at some distance from 
our camp-site, and wc wondered that it had not used our camp 
and the considerable material we left. It was explained by As- 
sistant Surgeon Wilson, who was left in charge of the sick, that 
the Colonel and staff of this regiment came in advance and said 
to Wilson that the camp looked so good and its streets and grad- 
ing in such fine condition that he thought they would occupy it. 

Wilson, wanting to save our lumber, etc., invented this pre- 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 43 

varication: "That's all right, Colonel, but we have a couple of 
mild cases of small-pox, and, while we have kept them well iso- 
lated, there may be danger." 

This ended the plan of occupying our camp, and the men of 
that regiment were forbidden to even visit it.' We loaded our 
wagons with about all that was worth while for use in our new 
camp and returned. 

Our Quartermaster returned to regimental duty and I returned 
to my company; but while acting as Quartermaster I receipted 
for two mules which were not properly accounted for in our 
Quartermaster's account, and they stood as a debit against me at 
the War Department. For years after the war every now and 
then I received notice that I owed the Department for these mules. 
Perhaps it has been marked off as a poor debt, for I have heard 
nothing of the matter for some years. 

We went to work to make a fine camp, dug out stumps and did 
some leveling of the ground; but for the first few days rain and 
snow interfered. The little stream running through the camp, 
which we called the " Little Tiber," was swollen to more than a 
" babbling brook." 

Our men were divided up for Provost duty — at the Baltimore 
and Ohio station, guarding public buildings at different head- 
quarters, supply depots, etc. — a variety of service throughout 
the city. 

I was detailed for special duty at the Old Capitol Prison, being 
on duty every other two days, a New Jersey officer alternating. 
This building was at one time the U. S. capitol, but now used as 
a prison for Confederate officers, political offenders, blockade- 
runners, etc. I was in charge of the guard supplied by a New 
Jersey regiment: responsible for roll call of prisoners mornings 
and in charge of all interviews with prisoners, the latter being 
the most troublesome of my duties. Friends of prisoners could 
get permits from the War Department to visit prisoners, permits 
specifying upon what subject they might converse, as "family 
matters," "inquiries as to friends," "general conversation," etc.; 
but political and war subjects were forbidden under a standing 
prohibition. 

My office was also the reception room, and in case of an inter- 
view the prisoner was brought to this room and kept apart from 
the visitor and conversation strictly limited to the subject named 
in the permit. There was a multitude of more than sympathizers 
with the South living in Washington, Georgetown, Baltimore 
and Alexandria, and some of these would have relatives or ac- 



44 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

quaintances in the prison, and permitted visitors were many. 
Women visitors largely predominated, most of them prominent 
in Washington society. 

It was quite usual for a matron to bring with her one or more 
attractive and entertaining young ladies, the purpose being to 
divert the attention of the officer in charge from the conversation 
with the prisoner. I often had invitations to call, to afternoon 
tea, offers of flowers, confections, fruit, etc., all for the plain 
purpose of cultivating friendly relations or creating obligations 
that might be presumed upon. 

One woman, prominent in Washington, a Southerner by citizen- 
ship and in spirit, whose husband held a government position, 
called often and often to see prisoners she had never known, 
evidently at request of some of the prisoners' families in the South 
received by "underground" mail. She always brought with her 
one or two young women worth looking at. 

She often tried to touch on forbidden subjects in her interviews 
with prisoners. Coming one day with a permit to see a young 
Confederate officer and learning from him that he was somewhat 
tired of the war and would like to be released and remain north, 
she said to him, in a whisper, "Don't disgrace yourself by taking 
the oath of allegiance." This was so flagrant that I discontinued 
the interview and asked her to leave. 

Colonel Wood, a peculiar character, was superintendent of the 
prison and I reported the matter to him. He was in a rage and 
said he would at once go to the War Department and see to it 
that she would never get another permit, and he went. I was 
surprised, therefore, some days later, when she returned with 
another permit to see another prisoner and with all her usual 
grace and charm of manner, just as if nothing unpleasant had 
occurred. She made no attempt to violate the privilege of her 
permit this time. She came a couple of times afterwards, and 
probably continued to do so after I left Washington. She was a 
fine looking woman of ability, and I am sure she did good service 
for the Confederate cause and in more ways than were known. 
It showed that the War Department was not impervious to the 
influence of "neutral enemies." 

After the war I became acquainted with a Baltimore gentleman 
who might be called the Confederate postmaster of that city, 
for during the war, for a period, he had charge of the underground 
mail to and from the South. 

He said it was surprising how regular the service was — not 
daily, of course, but not many days elapsed between times. 






ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 45 

He was arrested once and had he been searched, incriminating 
evidence would have been found in his pockets, including a com- 
munication from an officer of the Confederate government. He 
was given the privilege of visiting his family on his promise to 
return to custody, which gave him the happy opportunity for 
getting rid of the mail he had on his person. 

He was imprisoned for a while, but through the influence of 
a Washington woman friend of his wife's and also a friend of the 
wife of a War Department authority, he was released and nothing 
further came of it. 

He was a sympathize]- with the South to the extent of daring 
this dangerous service. 

This proves, what was otherwise evident enough, that informa- 
tion went through the lines regularly during the war and that 
there were women in Washington with active Confederate sym- 
pathies and large Federal influence. 

I remember one Miss who called with a permit to see a hand- 
some young Confederate officer on " personal matters." They 
proved to be lovers, although she was a Union girl. The prisoner 
tried to make a marriage engagement, but she insisted on waiting 
until the war was over — but said very encouraging things con- 
sidering that a stranger was present. He asked the privilege of 
a parting kiss, but the rules prohibited any nearness together 
of visitor and prisoner, probably to prevent the surreptitious 
passing of any note, or other thing, from one to the other. The 
prisoner jokingly said, "If this cruel lieutenant was not a Federal 
officer I would ask him to kiss you for me." She replied, "I 
would object to that, but not because he is a Union officer.'' 

He went back to his quarters and she broke down in.. sobs and 
tears, saying, "This is a cruel war." She calmed after a while 
and told me something of her "affair." "I do not believe in his 
cause," she said, "but I surely do believe in him." 

I could say very much of my experience while at the prison,, 
for every day had its interesting incidents. 

Often we had foreigners as prisoners, blockade-runners and 
speculating violators of neutrality, etc., and they would appeal 
to the embassies of their respective countries. This brought 
foreign ministers or attaches of legations for interviews with 
such prisoners. These had larger privileges, less limitations, and 
I met many who were then, or afterwards, distinguished in the 
diplomatic service. I preserved for awhile scores of these prison- 
caller's cards and I was sorry to finally lose them. 

One day, Lord Lyons, Britain's Plenipotentiary, called to see 



46 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

an English blockade-runner, and it reminded me of my seeing 
him in Albany with the suite of the Prince of Wales in I860. J 
am now reminded of the story of one of his official calls on President 
Lincoln. Lord Lyons was a bachelor and with all the dignity of 
his high office and the importance of his message, he said to the 
President: "May it please your Excellency, I have in my hand 
an autograph letter from nry Royal Mistress, Queen Victoria, 
which I am commanded to present to your Excellency. In it 
she informs you that her son, His Royal Highness the Prince of 
Wales, is about to contract a matrimonial alliance with Her Royal 
Highness the Princess Alexandra, of Denmark. " 

The Ambassador waited for the felicitous response eustomary 
in such case; but Mr. Lincoln replied, "Lord Lyons, go thou and 
do likewise." 

It is not known what report the Ambassador made to his Queen 
of the President's response to her royal autograph letter. 

John Hay, one of the President's secretaries, called at the 
prison one day for some information which the President desired, 
and I surely did not even guess that this pleasant young gentleman 
would become the notable diplomat and great Secretary of State 
so deservedly prominent in the civil service of his country. 

We had for some time a noted woman prisoner charged with 
being a Confederate spy, whom I will not name. She had a sepa- 
rate room, but was very carefully guarded. She was not a pleasant 
prisoner. When I made my first morning rounds after she arrived, 
with the prison secretary and an officer of the guard, to verify 
the prison roll, rapping at her door she insisted that she wasn't 
dressed. My duty was to positively see each prisoner and not 
trust to hearing. She was told this and given time to dress; but 
on my return she made the same excuse. I insisted that I had 
given her time to dress. She finally threw the door of her room 
wide open and showed that she was not dressed — much. With 
anger and unwomanly language she charged me with being a 
low-down Yankee invader of a defenseless lady's private apart- 
ment. After that when I made my morning call she would open 
her door without remark, and most of the times she was not more 
dressed than at first and showed less embarrassment than I felt. 

She had the privilege of walking the corridor at certain hours 
for exercise, the space limited by a guard. One day I heard a 
woman's screams on the second floor and going to find what it 
meant, found my lady spy sprawling on the floor, kicking and 
screaming before a very much disconcerted guard. He explained 
that in her exercise walk she tried to pass him. He told her she 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 47 

must not go farther when she viciously spat in his face, and in 
quick anger he slapped her face. She insisted that he had almost 
killed her and sent out a volley of unquotable language. Her face 
gave no evidence of injury and I offered to send the prison surgeon 
to her, but she wouldn't have it so. I insisted that she should 
apologize to the guard for her insult and indignity which, a few 
hours later, she did, but in an ungracious way. I was glad when 
she was removed to another prison. She was far from being a 
poor sample of Southern women, although quite a "good looker/' 

One morning, one of my prison guard, an attractive New Jersey 
lad whom I had favorably noticed before, came to me with a 
telegram in his hand and tears in his eyes. The telegram was 
from his home announcing the serious illness of his father and 
urging him to try and get home. He wanted a furlough. I told 
him that I would do all I could, but that I had had experience 
in getting furloughs and three days was as soon as one could be 
procured; for the application had to go the rounds of several 
offices. He feared his father might die in the meantime. 

He brightened up with his proposition that I give him a note 
to President Lincoln, certifying to his character as a soldier, etc., 
and he would do his best to see the President. I said that I would 
willingly give him a strong note, but that it was almost an im- 
possibility to reach the President and that he could hardly expect 
the President to be troubled with furloughs. He felt that it was 
his only chance and he started for the White House with the note 
and telegram. 

In a short time he returned and I knew from his appearance 
that he had succeeded. He reported that on his arrival at the 
White House he was told that he could not see or communicate 
with the President; but just then he saw the President coming 
towards the door as if to go out. He at once said, loudly, "You 
can't prevent my seeing the President — I see him now!" The 
President came to him and inquired what his trouble was. He 
Rave him the telegram and the note and said; "Mr. President, 
I do so want to see my father again before he dies." "Of course 
you do,'' said the President, "come with me, I am on my way 
to the War Department," and putting his arm about the boy- 
soldier as they walked, inquired about his family, his father's 
> age, if his mother were living and many other kindly questions. 

Reaching the War Department they went into Secretary Stan- 
I ton's private office and the President said to the Secretary; "I 
I want a ten days' furlough for this young man,'' explaining the 
reason. The Secretary called the proper official and in a few 






48 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

minutes the President handed the lad a War Department furlough 
for ten days. He took the boy's hand and said he hoped he would 
not only find his father alive, but out of danger; asked the boy 
to give the father his respects; trusted the lad would come out of 
the service of his country unharmed and live long to enjoy the 
consciousness of having done his duty — or words to this effect. 

The boy, while happy with his furlough, could not suppress 
his tears, saying, "I am all broken up by that great man's kind- 
ness to me — me, only a private among thousands." 

He left by the next train, arrived at home two days before his 
father's death and returned one day before his furlough expired. 
He said that he believed his father died happier for knowing what 
the President had done for his boy. 

It was, indeed, beautiful evidence of the inherent gracioushess 
of the Great Lincoln — just one incident of a multitude of like 
kind. 

Hon. Orlando Kellogg, then our Congressman-elect, visited our 
camp (which we named "Camp Adirondack") with a delegation 
from Clinton County on a mission to the Treasury Department. 
It seems that a clause had somehow been " smuggled" into the 
Appropriation Act of the previous Congress abolishing Pittsburgh 
as a port of entry and removing the custom-house to Rouse's 
Point. The first that Plattsburgh knew of it, as I understood. 
was the receipt by the Customs Collector at Plattsburgh of an 
order from the Treasury Department to carry out the act. Our 
Congressman, Mr. Wheeler, afterwards Vice-President, was ab- 
sent, in Europe I believe, and Congressman-elect Kellogg with 
this delegation of Plattsburgh citizens was sent to Washington 
to see what could be done to save Plattsburgh. 

Mr. Kellogg tented with me that night. 

The next morning, as I was off duty that day, he invited me 
to go with him and the delegation, which we joined at the Willard 
Hotel. Arriving at the rooms of the Assistant Secretary of the 
Treasury, who had issued the order, Mr. Kellogg sent in his card 
requesting an interview. Answer was returned that this officer 
was engaged and Mr. Kellogg would have to call again the next 
day. The Assistant Secretary's door was partly open and the 
talking and laughing in the room indicated that there was more 
visiting than business going on. Kellogg was a bluff, earnest 
man, looking much like the portraits of Daniel Webster in his 
general personal appearance. 

He said to the door attendant: ''Tell Mr. Assistant Secretary 
that the Congressman-elect of the 10th District of New York. 






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Major 
CHARLES E. PRUYX 



X 

ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 49 

with a delegation of his constituents, is waiting to see him upon 
a matter of importance; tell him that we propose to wait right 
here until an interview is granted, and if we have to wait long 
would like to be provided with chairs." 

Some of the delegation suggested that this sort of message 
might offend the Assistant Secretary, but Mr. Kellogg said, 
"Wait and see." 

Very soon the door man returned followed by the party that 
was inside and said, "The Secretary will see you now," and we 
were ushered into the honorable presence. The Assistant Secretary 
made some apologies; but Mr. 'Kellogg, after introducing his 
party, promptly presented the subject of his visit. 

"What is it you want me to do — what can I do?" was the 
Secretary's inquiry. "We want you," said Mr. Kellogg, "to 
countermand your order for the removal of the custom-house 
and I will take care of the matter myself when Congress meets." 
The officer declared that this was impossible; the Department 
must obey acts of Congress, etc. 

After discussion Mr. Kellogg asked if he might take the matter 
to the Secretary of the Treasury. The officer replied that he had 
no objection, but it was useless to take the Secretary's time as the 
matter belonged to his — the Assistant Secretary's — jurisdiction. 
Mr. Kellogg then asked whether the officer would go with him 
to Secretary Chase and he said he would. 

We then went before Secretary Chase, and I remember what a 
strikingly fine looking man Secretary Chase was, although I had 
seen him before. Mr. Kellogg presented- his business and the 
Assistant Secretary stated his views. Mr. Chase said that he 
thought the Assistant Secretary was right; but Mr. Kellogg 
insisted that a great wrong was being done to an important town 
in his district and that he would not stand for it, and earnestly 
said much else. Finally Mr. Chase said that he sympathized 
with Mr. Kellogg's feeling and if he would cite any precedent 
for a Department officer even delaying any similar duty imposed 
by Congress, he would have the Plattsburgh order revoked pending 
the action of the next Congress. 

Mr. Kellogg thanked him, saying: "I have no case in mind, 
but the books ought to be full of them"; that he would go to 
the Congressional Library and see what he could find, "but even 
if I find no precedent, you must mako one; that order must be 
revoked!" 

He did find something and the order was revoked. A less able, 
vigorous and persistent man than Mr. Kellogg would have failed. 
I much enjoyed that morning's experience. 



r 



50 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

A couple of days later Mr. Kellogg again stayed in my tent 
over night and in the morning, it being another of my off-duty 
days, we took a long walk and reached Jackson Park opposite 
the White House. It was a pleasant, warm spring morning and 
after sitting there a while Mr. Kellogg proposed that we call on 
the President. I hesitated, but he had little trouble in persuading 
me. Mr. Kellogg had served in the same Congress with Mr. 
Lincoln and, of course, had met him since he became President. 

We found several waiting to see the President; but Mr. Kellogg 
sent in his card and soon Mr. Kellogg's name was called. He 
followed the usher and I " toddled after. " 

Mr. Lincoln was sitting, his back towards the door with one 
leg upon his desk, or table, his trouser-leg halfway down to his 
knee. I first noticed his foot which seemed very large as it pointed 
up from the table. He partly turned his head when Mr. Kellogg 
was announced and reaching his right hand backward over his 
left shoulder took Mr. Kellogg's hand, saying, "My dear friend, 
I am glad to see you. Take a chair." He dropped his leg and 
arose, still holding Mr. Kellogg's hand. I was introduced, when 
he remarked to Air. Kellogg: "I am glad to see that you know 
the kind of company to keep. I hardly feel respectable these days 
if I haven't a soldier for a companion. Citizen's dress doesn't 
amount to much nowadays. Is this one of your constituents?" 

"Yes," replied Mr. Kellogg, introducing me, "his regiment was 
wholly raised in my district — they are all my boys." 

I expressed my gratification at meeting my Commander-in- 
Clnef and said to him that we called Mr. Kellogg the "Father 
of our Regiment." He said (o Mr. Kellogg, "That is a fine honor." 

We remained for at least half an hour, the President and Air. 
Kellogg indulging in recollections and reminiscences of the Con- 
gress in which they had jointly served. Air. Kellogg often laughed 
heartily, and while the President seemed to enjoy the things at 
which Air. Kellogg laughed, he scarcely smiled. His expression 
was pleasant but his countenance changed very little during the 
conversation. 

Cards kept coming in. He glanced at them and dropped them 
on the table as the}* came. 

Finally Mr. Kellogg arose to go. "Don't hurry," the President 
said. Air. Kellogg replied that he had taken considerable of his 
valuable time and the cards indicated that others were waiting 
to see him. 

The President said, picking up some of the cards: "These 
gentlemen will wait; they all want something. You want nothing 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 51 



and I have enjoyed your call and this revival of our experiences 
in that Congress. We thought then that our responsibilities were 
considerable; but compare them with what confronts us now! 
You, me — even this young man/' putting his hand on my 
shoulder. "I am thankful that you will be in the next Congress. 
You are a friend I can depend upon, and, Kellogg, I need that 
sort/' 

Turning to me he remarked: "I count you and every soldier a 
friend. I trust you will survive the war and see a reunited country 
and be happy in the fact that you did your part to make it so/' 
and with a hearty handshake he followed us to the door. 

He seemed very serious and solemn as he bowed his tall form 
in a sort of parting gesture. I wish I had made a memorandum 
of his and Kellogg's conversation. 

A couple of officers of the Arm}' of the Potomac, having friends 
in our regiment, came to spend a Sunday with us in camp, and 
never having seen President Lincoln desired very much to get a 
glimpse of him. We thought if we went to the President's church 
that Sunday evening they might get this glimpse. Arriving at 
the church, we asked an usher if he would show us the President's 
pew, meaning would he point out its location. He asked us to 
wait until he had seated a party in waiting. Coming back he 
beckoned us and gave us a pew which we fully filled. We soon 
found on the arm of the pew a silver plate inscribed ''President." 
The usher had taken our request literally and given us the Presi- 
dent's pew. We were embarrassed and as the usher passed again 
we explained. He said it would be all right if the President did 
not come, and if he did he would give us other sittings. The 
President did not come and sitting in his pew was the nearest 
" glimpse" of Mr. Lincoln we could afford our visiting friends. 
We noticed that we were being observed and felt a bit conspicuous 
in occupying the President's pew. 

Just before we left Washington and when we were under orders 
to be ready to move, Lieutenants Riggs, Carter and myself went 
to Brady's celebrated photograph gallery to leave our negatives 
from which we might order photographs when wanted. Our 
officers had started an exchange of photos so that each one might 
have one of each. The office of the gallery was on the second 
floor of a three-story building, the operating rooms being on the 
third floor. 

We found no one ahead of us and while registering and getting 
our numbered cards, Mi\ Nicola}-, one of the President's secretaries, 
came in and said to the man in charge that the President had boon 



52 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

asked by Mr. Brady to pose for a standing, full-length phoio 
and that he was in his carriage outside and would come in if the 
matter could have immediate attention. 

We waited no longer, hurried upstairs, to be in the operating 
rooms when the President came. Shortly after the office man ap- 
peared with President Lincoln and requested that we waive our 
priority in his behalf. Lieutenant Riggs replied, rather dramati- 
cally: "Certainly, our Commander-in-Chief comes first every- 
where." Mr. Lincoln thanked us and said, in substance: "Soldiers 
come first everywhere, these days. Black-coats are at a discount in 
the presence of the blue and I recognize the merit of the discount." 

The operator was a Frenchman, with a decided accent. He 
said to the President that there was considerable call for a full- 
length standing photograph of him. The President jokingly in- 
quired whether this could be done with a single negative, saying: 
"You see, I'm six feet four in my stockings." The operator 
replied that it could be done all right and left to arrange for the 
"standing." 

The President then said to us that he had lately seen a very 
long, or rather, a very wide landscape photograph and that he 
wondered if there was a camera large enough to take in such an 
area; but on close examination he found that it had been taken 
in parts and nicely joined together, and he thought, perhaps, this 
method might be necessary for his "full length 'landscape.'" 

The operator announced that he was ready and they went 
into the camera room, but the President stood where we could 
see and hear him. He asked whether he should stand as if address- 
ing a jury "with my arm like this," stretching out his right arm. 
The operator came to him several times, placing the President's 
arms by his side, turning his head, adjusting his clothing, etc. 
"Just look natural," said the operator. "That is what I would 
like to avoid," Mr. Lincoln replied. 

In the meantime each of us tried on the President's tall hat 
and it fitted Lieutenant Riggs finely. 

The President came back to us and told us of a custom saw-mill 
built in the earl}' days out in his part of the country, a very up-to- 
date single-gate mill, of which the owner was proud. One day a 
farmer brought from some distance an oak log, by ox team, to 
be sawed into plank and waited for the product. The log was 
adjusted and the saw started and all went lovely — for a while. 
A crash came! It proved that in the early days of this oak tree 
an iron spike had been driven into it and covered from sight by 
later growth, but the saw found it. The saw was broken and 



rr- 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 53 

other damage done to the mill, to the grief of the owner. He shut 
oil the water and while sorrowfully investigating the cause of the 
disaster, the farmer anxiously inquired, "Say, yer ain't spiled 
the plank, hev yer?" "Goll dern yer old log — just look what 
it has done to the mill!" replied the mill man. 

"That camera man," continued the President, "seemed anxious 
about the picture; but, boys, I didn't know what might happen 
to the camera." 

The operator came from the dark room, holding the negative 
up to a window, and asked the President to look at it, suggesting 
that it was very natural. "Yes," said the President, "that is 
my objection. These cameras are painfully truthful," saying 
this with an assumed solemnity. 

Two other negatives, with little change in pose, were taken, 
and the President was asked if he had any choice. He replied, 
"They look about alike as three peas." 

The operator mentioned that Secretary Seward had recently 
visited the gallery for a sitting and the President asked, "Did 
he tell you any stories?" The operator said he did not, and the 
President said: "I did not suppose he did, for Mr. Seward is 
limited to a couple of stories which from repeating he believes 
are true." He then said he had recently heard a story about 
Mr. Seward that, whether true or not, was "a good one on him." 
He related it and, in substance, to the effect that during the then 
last presidential campaign Mr. Seward engaged to speak at a 
"pole raising and mass meeting" affair and was asked to make 
a later date because the pole couldn't be made ready for the 
raising; the point being that they evidently considered the raising 
of the pole of more consequence than Mr. Seward's presence and 
speech. He told the story with some animation and with bits 
of interspersed humor. 

Mr. Lincoln seemed happy and care-free that morning and we 
thought he really enjoyed his hour or so at the gallery. Mr. 
Xicolay, who had driven away with the carriage, returned for the 
| President. Mr. Lincoln again thanked us for our courtesy in 
waiving our first claim to gallery service, trusted that we would 
live through the war, and giving each of us a hearty handshake 
departed. We went to a window looking upon the street and 
| saw him seated in quite a common looking barouche, with his 
secretary, and drive away — nothing appearing to indicate that 
this man, President of the United States and Comma nder-in- 
C hief of its army and navy, was other than an ordinary citizen. 

He did not recognize me as having called on him some days 



54 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

before with Mr. Kellogg;, but that was no wonder, for his old 
friend Kellogg absorbed his attention on that occasion, and soldiers 
must have come to look very much alike to him. 

Unfortunately I made no memorandum of this, to me, important 
incident, but afterwards wrote the foregoing account and sub-. 
mitted it to Lieutenants Riggs and Carter, and they regarded it 
as correct as far as it went, but far from covering the whole story. 

I had seen the President often as he drove through or walked 
the streets of Washington, but esteemed myself largely favored 
by this chance meeting him face to face on these two occasions. 
I afterwards secured the full-length photo then taken at Brady's, 
but lost it. I have seen very few portraits of Lincoln that were 
satisfactory- — he appeared so different when talking than in 
repose. 

As they come to mind just now I will parenthesize a couple of 
Lincoln-Douglas " mentions. " 

This first one I have never heard repeated, nor seen in print 
but once and think it was in the Life of John A. Logan. 

In the Lincoln-Douglas debates, it was said that at first Douglas 
did not fully or courteously appreciate the "size" of Lincoln: 
but at the debate previous to the one in which this incident 
occurred Lincoln enthused his hearers to exciting demonstrations 
of approval, which may have made Douglas "take notice." 

Anyhow, at this particular debate, Mr. Douglas in closing his 
"inning" to make way for Mr. Lincoln, made complimentary 
reference to his opponent. Lincoln rising to speak, turned to 
Douglas and thanked him for his kind words, adding: "Compli- 
ments are to me what gingerbread was to a boy friend of mine. 
Meeting him at a general training eating gingerbread, I asked 
him if he liked it. Pie replied, 'Abe, there is nothing in God's 
world I like so much and get so little of.'" 

There was more of the pathetic than of humor in what Lincoln 
said, for his manner was decidedly serious. 

During the Lincoln-Douglas presidential campaign of 1S60, 
Douglas came east and, I believe, spoke in Glens Falls. Any- 
how, Judge Brown of Glens Falls rode in a carriage with him to 
Lake George and during the drive asked Douglas what sort of 
a law} r er Lincoln was.. 

As nearly as I can remember Judge Brown's statements, Douglas 
replied: "I know lawyers who are more comprehensive of all 
points involved in the trial of cases, more elaborate in their 
briefs, but Mr. Lincoln emphasizes the more important points 
in a case and before a jury has few equals." 






ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 55 



So it was, that in the very heat of that exciting campaign, 
Douglas, to his credit, spoke kindly of his long-time political 
antagonist. 

General N. M. Curtis of Ogdensburgh, N. Y., the "Hero of 
Fort Fisher/' told me this Lincolnism: 

The General was six feet six inches tall, and the first time he 
met President Lincoln, the President, readily seeing that the 
General "over-topped" him by a couple of inches, said, "General, 
do you know when your feet are cold?" 

General Curtis might have replied that good soldiers ought 
not to have "cold feet." 

I have already said that Colonel Wood, Superintendent of the 
Old Capitol Prison, was a peculiar character. He certainly was. 
Pie was prominent in the U. S. Secret Service, usually dressed 
as a citizen and was a shrewd, nervous, restless, unpretentious 



blond. He mingled freely with the prisoners, and when a death 
occurred among them, he quite always attended the funeral and 
burial, taking two or three prisoners with him to the cemetery, 
without guards. 

He often picked out a prisoner or more, usually more, to come 
to his rooms in the prison for a little "spread," with wine, etc. 
It was to loosen their tongues, hoping to secure information that 
might be useful to the Government, and he sometimes succeeded. 
He had a stenographer hidden behind a thin partition on such 
occasions who took down conversation on signal. He had im- 
mediate access to the Secretary of War at any time and to other 
army headquarters. 

He had a favorite scheme, or " fad," which he loved to talk about . 
If sufficiently encouraged by the Government, he wanted to organ- 
ize a body of men, with proper equipment, subject only to his 
(orders, and contract with the Government for specific service. 
If it was desired to destroy a bridge, a railroad, or make a raid 
into the enemy's country for information or other purpose — 
in fact any service not requiring a large force, or long campaign — 
he would make a price for doing the "job." He had great con- 
fidence in a small body of daring men secretly and discreetly 
handled, free from military regulations and red tape, every man 
engaged to have his share of the price of success; he believed that 
•^uch a body would be more efficient and cheaper for certain pur- 
poses than a larger force hampered by military methods. 

He surely had confidence in his scheme, but had failed to in- 
fluence favorable consideration of those influential in the conduct 
of the war. 



56 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

He was always interested in every fresh lot of prisoners brought 
in, adroitly engaging them in conversation for the purpose of 
getting information. 

While at times the prison was rather crowded, yet it was kept 
clean and sanitary, the food provided was better than that 
supplied our own soldiers, and the sick had fine hospital care. 
Quantities of things were sent in for individual prisoners, often 
for all, from Baltimore, Washington, Alexandria and other places 
where sympathizers with the South lived, and there were lots of 
them. These things had to be examined for ''contraband," 
before delivery. 

One evening Cassius M. Clay came to the prison to call on his 
friend, Colonel Wood. It was not long before Mr. Clay's resigna- 
tion as Major General and reappointment as U. S. Minister to 
Russia. Colonel Wood invited Mr. Clay to a steamed-oyster 
lunch at ''Harvey's." This was a popular restaurant where 
steamed oysters originated and were sold by the bushel. I was 
also invited and much enjoyed the oysters and the conversation. 
Mr. Clay was peculiar, but very evidently worthy of his prominence 
in national affairs. His aggressive influence for the Union in 
Kentucky required courage and ability. He appeared quite 
serious on this occasion, but cordial and agreeable. 

The street guard of the prison was instructed to arrest any 
person discovered attracting the attention of the prisoners or 
signaling them, and many arrests were made, most of them on 
suspicion. Often a carriage load of women, usually those of in- 
different character, was brought in for waving handkerchiefs, 
singing, or shouting, to express sympathy with the prisoners or 
just to attract attention or add to the excitement of a "lark." 

One evening a sobbing young miss was brought in, explaining 
that she was taking a walk with handkerchief in hand and un- 
consciously twirling it; that she did not think of the prison or 
prisoners and that she and her family were "Union folks." It 
was clear that she was innocent of any overt intention, and as 
she seemed so disturbed by her arrest and living but a few blocks 
away, I sent a corporal of the guard to escort her home and explain 
to her family. He was pleasantly received at her home and asked 
to call again. He improved the opportunity and said to me, 
later on, that if he survived the war his interest in the young miss 
was likely to be for life. I have wondered how this bit of incipient 
romance came out. 

As the Old Capitol was very near the present Capitol, I often 
visited the Senate and House of Representatives. Men who 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 57 

- 

were prominent national characters became quite familiar to 
sight, and I listened to man} 7 important debates which were in- 
fluential in shaping our country's history. I had also seen all the 
members of the President's Cabinet so frequently as to have a 
sight acquaintance. Indeed, our stay in Washington had many 
advantages and pleasures and I had my share. 

Washington itself was far from being the beautiful city it now 
is. Few of the streets were paved; they had their ups and downs 
and when not muddy were dusty and all the time dirty. Street 
car lines (horse car) were few and it was difficult getting about. 
There was much uncleanness and much that was offensive and 
unsanitary. 

But one resolute and able man, Alexander R. Shepherd, Governor 
of the District and head of the Board of Public Works — "Boss 
Shepherd," as he was called — had a vision of a ''Washington 
Beautiful" which he officially made visible to the eyes of others. 
He leveled streets, leaving residences perched high above that 
level, and accomplished a great work. He was hated and abused 
as a despotic ''grafter," an autocratic abuser of property rights. 
Improvements which he could not make lawfully he made just 
the same. Property afterwards largely increased in value because 
of these improvements which the owners had thought meant 
financial ruin. He did great things for Washington against large 
difficulties and opposition and much vituperation. He was the 
pioneer in fundamental betterments which made possible the 
Washington of to-dav. 

He finally left Washington for Mexico, a poor man, a com- 
paratively small salary having been his only recompense for his 
large sendee, and the "graft" of which he was accused was the 
fable of his many enemies. I believe he made a fortune in Mexico 
~- mining. Hope he did. 

It is but a small recognition of his work and worth that his 
modest statue has a place with the many that adorn the city — ■ 
the beauty of which he made possible. 

While stationed in Washington I attended the theater a few 
times — the Washington, the Grover and the Ford — the latter 
»>ccoming historic as the scene of President Lincoln's assassination. 
I heard Clark the comedian in "Speed the Plow" and in another 
Play; Wallaek in "Othello, 7 ' and the opera "11 Trovatore" with 
"Hgnoli, Maccaferro and other noted artists of that day in the 
east. 

General Martindale was then in command at Washington, and 
official business made me meet him often enough to make his 

'lU'dntanee, afterwards renewed in the field. 



58 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

At this camp we discharged one of my company because of 
"chronic nostalgia" — just mortal homesickness. It was a 
common sickness for the first few months of our camp life; but 
this fellow had been a pampered boy at home and became emaci- 
ated and run down, unfit for any service, and it was decided thai 
he never would be, even if he survived. 

Another young man, less afflicted, with the same trouble, feigned 
sickness and tried all sorts of ways to prove his good-for-nothing- 
ness and get discharged. Some of his comrades secured a blank 
discharge and filled it up with his name, noting the reason for 
discharge as Non Co?npos Mentis. It was mailed to him and 
gave him much joy until he understood the cruel joke; but ho 
insisted that he had the disease mentioned in the fake discharge, 
until its meaning was explained. He, later on, became a good 
soldier. Homesickness, more or less severe, was pretty general, 
and natural enough, too. 

Those early days of our military life were to us, so suddenly 
separated from our homes, painfully depressing and trying, 
actually producing illness. 

Visiting one of our men in hospital he said with sickly facetious- 
ness: "I am experiencing the feeling of being in two wide-apart 
places right now. I know I'm flat on my back in this hospital 
and I also know that I'm home-sick, awfully homesick." 

We had deaths in camp and hospitals while in Washington: 
one, Adolphus Perry, who had been a schoolmate of mine, died o: 
a fever in our camp hospital. He was a lively, cheerful boy, who 
had enlisted from patriotic motives and his death was indeed a 
personal grief. 

M} r Captain, Livingston, was taken with typhoid fever and we 
left him in hospital when we were ordered away. He did not 
rejoin the regiment for some months. 

April 9, 1S62. John G. Witherbee of Port Henry gave a dinner 
at \\ illard's for such of our officers as could be spared from camp 
and other duties, and, later, Hon. Orlando Kellogg gave a dinner 
at the same place, but being on duty I could not attend either c-; 
these ''swell" affairs. 

Sunday, April 12. We received orders to be prepared to move, 
but marching orders did not come until April 20. In the mean- 
time all sorts of opinions and speculation obtained as to where 
we would go and a multitude of letters went North announcing 
that we were under orders to move, probably "into the jaws oi 
conflict." Some of our boys had an alarming way of allaying 
the fears arid anxieties of their home friends. 



W*" 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 59 

Our sick were sent to hospitals, surplus stores and equipage 
"turned m" and officer's personal baggage reduced. Our tents 
were to be left and "dog," or shelter tents issued, each man to 
carry a section, which, buttoned with another, would just about 
cover two recumbent men. It all looked like active field 
campaigning. 

During the few days, between orders to be ready and marching 
orders, with the regiment all together, company and battalion 
drills were resumed. 

Sunday, April 19. We had our last dress parade at this camp. 
Colonel Richards, who has been in hospital with rheumatism, 
commanded, to the pleasure of all of us, and it was his last ap- 
pearance with us, he being compelled to remain in hospital. This 
dress parade was attended by a large crowd of citizens. Had a 
well attended church service this p.m. 

Monday, April 20. Having marching orders and six days 
rations, we left our pleasant and comfortable camp and. boarded 
the transport Utica, starting at about noon down the Potomac. I 

We were interested in Alexandria and very much so in Mount 
Vernon, which we passed with tolling bell and uncovered heads. 
Coming on dark, we anchored at near the entrance to Chesa- 
peake Bay. * 

As our orders were to proceed to Fortress Monroe, we quite 
easily guessed that we were going to the relief of Suffolk, then 
besieged by Longstreet. It was somewhat rough on the Chesa- 
peake and many were more or less seasick. Stopping, next day, 
at Fortress Monroe for a while, we reached Norfolk late p.m. 
and entrained on platform cars for Suffolk. It was a warm, 
pleasant night and the boys were noisily jolly, hilariously singing 
and shouting. 

We stopped in going through a part of the Dismal Swamp for 
our engine to take water, and while waiting we could hear the 
boom of artillery. We inquired of the soldiers guarding the 
water station what .that booming was and were told that we 
would find out all about it when we reached Suffolk. There was 
no more hilarity, for as we went on we could hear the artillery 
above the noise of the train and I am sure that our sudden silence 
was rot for the purpose of hearing the guns more distinctly. 

V. hen nearing Suffolk we began to sec the arched paths of the 
burr irg fuses of bombs nrd shells and the flash of their explosion. 
It was our first experience with hostile artillery and most of us 
remembered our homes and " bitterly thought of the morrow." 

A pril 22. Arrived at Suffolk late last night. We slept as best 



60 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

we could around the railroad station. Suffolk is in a state of siege 
by Longstreet and at some points only the narrow Nansemond is 
between the advanced lines of skirmishers. 

April 23, 1S63. Rainy, cold and unpleasant. Artillery and 
picket firing has been a continuous performance to-day. We have 
a sort of camp in the mud with our "dog" tents, and they are 
very scant shelter. Camp being on the outskirts of Suffolk, pig 
pens and shanties proved better shelter than our tents and were 
used to their capacity. 

April 24. Rained all night and until noon. The air is damp 
and chilly with mud "a plenty." About noon had orders to occupy 
Fort Dix, some distance away. Most of the troops are in motion, 
taking up different stations, and a force of some 10,000 went out 
on a reconnoissance. Heavy cannonading, and one of our light 
batteries is actively engaged in plain sight from the fort. 

April 2d. About 40 killed and wounded in yesterday's re- 
connoissance. Drilled company in skirmish drill. Raised a flag 
pole and hoisted "Old Glory" in the sight of the enemy. 

April 2G. Sunday. Inspection, open-air religious service and 

less artillery fire. 

- 

April 27. Went down along the Nansemond below Suffolk 
to build earthworks on the river bank. Under fire all day from 
sharpshooters in the shrubbery on the other side of the river. 
Two men slightly wounded. A couple of pieces of our artillery 
came towards night and drove off the annoying sharpshooters. 
A small steamer which had been lying at Suffolk landing came 
down the river, under fire, to make its escape. The steamer was 
protected with bales of hay and floated a large flag. It was an 
exciting sight. She made her "get-away" all right, although 
much fired at by rifles and artillery. 

April 2S. Cold rain. Slept in the "open" last night; clothing 
soaked this morning. Sharpshooters still persistent and an 
artilleryman and one artillery horse were killed. Kept at digging 
intrenchments on the high bank of the river. Bullets from the 
sharpshooters across the river were frequent visitors, but strangely 
enough none of our men were hit. 

April 29. We were relieved last night by another regiment 
and returned to camp; but in the afternoon were ordered to occupy 
Fort MeClellan, located in a swampy spot. Still raining. 

April 30. Rainy, and with only shelter tents we are, speakia- 
mildly, uncomfortable. Clothes and blankets soaked. I Wen' 
outside the fort and occupied a hog pen, spending the day i'- 
making out company muster rolls. Were this p.m. mustered for 
pay by Colonel Wardrup of the 99th New York. 




Lieutenant and Adjutant 
JOHN L. CARTER 




Chaplain 
CHARLES L. HAGAR 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT . 61 

Map L Pleasant, and we are getting dried out in the friendly 
sunshine. We were turned out at 3 a.m. and went to Fort Union, 
also located in a swamp with very muddy mud. The 99th N. Y. 
went outside our works to drive back an advanced "bunch'' of 
the enemy. Our advance was aided by a sharp artillery fire from 
Fort Nansemond. Several killed and wounded on both sides. 

May 2. Am officer of the da}'. We were turned out about 
9 p.m. last night by our pickets being driven in and we stood to 
arms until midnight; then turned in with our accouterments on, 
but nothing further occurred. 

May 3. Sunday. Picket firing about 4 a.m. this morning 
and we were turned out and under arms for an hour. Several 
regiments crossed the Nansemond and heavy firing heard. Killed 
and wounded reported at 100. 

May 4. Ordered out at 4 a.m. with 60 rounds of ammunition 
and three days' rations; but this order was changed to sending 
two of our companies to Fort McClellan and four to Fort Nanse- 
mond, four remaining at Fort Union. Our pickets report that 
the enemy has retired and quite all our force here are leaving in 
pursuit. Luckily for us our regiment is left in the fortifications. 
Prisoners were brought in during the day and most of our troops 
returned about sundown, very tired, but had done little damage 
to the retreating enemy — he had too long a start. All quiet 
to-night and no fear of alarms. 

May 5. No artillery or picket firing, no stir of troops; a quiet 
and pleasant day. Several regiments have left Suffolk and we 
expect to leave for somewhere. 

May 6. Heavy rain kept us in our "'dog 7 ' tents. We hear that 
Hooker is advancing the Army of the Potomac and we are anxious 
for news. 

May 7. Misty. Drilled company two hours this morning 
and in skirmish drill two hours this afternoon. Rained late p.m. 

May 8. Our company on guard duty. Rained quite all day. 
Heard from Captain Livingston that he is convalescing — good 
news. 

May 9. Hot. Drilled company in skirmish drill. Hear that 
Hooker has recrossed the Rappahannock; another bloody failure. 
Last night a group of soldiers were discussing the value of superior 
numbers in battle, when an Irish soldier philosophized like this: 
"I'm thinkin' that it isn't so important which side has the most 
min when fightin' begins as which side has the most min when 
theiiohtin'-inds." 

May 10. Sunday. General inspection and open-air church 



62 TJIREE YEARS WITH THE 

service. Fine day above,- muddy below, so will think on things 
above. 

May 11. Hot. Battalion drill a.m. and company drill p.m. 

May 12. Same as yesterday. 

This story is going the rounds of our camp. One of our men 
showed his morning ration to his Captain, complaining of its 
quality. The Captain took the soldier's tin cup and, tasting its 
contents, said, " That's a pretty fair sort of soup." 

" Soup! " shouted the man; " that's what is being handed out 
for coffee!" 

May 13. Same drills, battalion and company. Several regi- 
ments marched towards the Blackwater to-day. Reconnoissance, 
we suppose; perhaps to break the tiresome monotony of camp 
life, which is sometimes a good thing to do. 

May 14. Have orders to move and make a brigade camp 
southeast of Suffolk and quite near the town. Nineteenth Wiscon- 
sin on right, 9th Vermont, our regiment, with 99th New York 
on left and called the " Reserve Brigade," Brigadier General 
Isaac Wistar in command. Camp well located, level but can be 
well drained. It looks like staying here a while, but — 

May 15. Hard at work preparing our new camp. 

May 16. Warm. Digging a well for camp use and other camp 
work. Orders this p m. to be in readiness to march with three 
days' rations. 

May 17. Sunday. Weather clear and hot. Inspection and 
our Chaplain held service in the Methodist Church in Suffolk. 
Seemed good to get into a regular "mcetin' house" once more. 

May IS. Last night about 10 o'clock had orders to march, 
but before we had formed up, orders were countermanded. Am 
officer of the day and our company on guard duty. Our men 
are getting tired of camp life; such tiresome sameness, one day 
so like the others. The following is the way one soldier has 
rhymed "The Monotonous Variety of Camp Life": 

Sinking war-songs, playing cards, 

Eating bran-soup, running guards, 

Hiking, drilling, exercising, 

Lying round philosophizing; 

Digging ditches, learning tactics, 

Standing iraard until your hack aches; 

Washing clothes, picking trash up, 

Cleaning camp, dishing hash up; 

Chawing hardtack, sick of pork; * 

Bits of rest and chunks of work; 

Without papers, without books, 

Growling, grumbling, cussin' cooks, 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 63 

Writing letters, cleaning; tents up, 
In your clothing sewing rents up; 
Scouring buttons, blacking shoes, 
Cleaning gun for ready use, 
Keeping bright our plates and cups, 
Saluting our '•higher-ups"; 
Wondering what our orders are, 
Telling how to run the war; 
Turning in at sound of taps — 
Dream of peace and home, perhaps; 
Turning out at break of day — ■ 
Same old things in same old way; 
Wishing, through every bit of it, 
That this infernal war would quit — 
But not until our flag is free 
To float where'er it used to be. 

May 19. Hot. Company drill. So hot that most of the men 
kept to their scanty shelter tents after drill. Visited 9th Vermont 
headquarters and made pleasant acquaintances. 

May 20. At noon received marching orders and with the 9th 
Vermont marched to "Deserted House/' so called, reaching there 
at about 5 p.m. and joining several other regiments there; marched 
to Windsor and bivouacked. 

May 21. Company A on picket and rest of our regiment sent 
out scouting. Last night I heard a mild word conflict between 
a middle-aged Irish soldier and a young fellow who was apt to 
boast of his courage without convincing any one that he had much 
to brag about. The closing ' ' round ' ' of the Irishman was like this : 
''Ye remoind me, distantly loik, of the great Lord Nelson. The 
last thing he ever did was to die fur his country, and oim belavin' 
that that is the last thing ye think of doin', if ye can help it." 

May 22. Very hot. We turned out at about 3 o'clock this a.m. 
and under arms till six. A brigade has gone out farther towards 
the Blackwater. The railroad is being torn up, which is probably 
one purpose of the expedition and also to clear the region of 
scouting detachments of the enemy. 

May 23. Still oppressively hot. We were under arms most of 
the night with very little sleep. Two days' rations came to us by 
mule teams to-day. We needed them. 

May 24. Under arms most of the night again. We understand 
that we are the very outer line towards the enemy, our pickets, 
only, being some distance in front of us; so there is need of being 
alert. To-day we marched down the railroad towards Suffolk 
and bivouacked for the night — short but hot march. 

May 2o. Cooler with rain. Plenty of fresh meat to-night 
and it certainly was not furnished by our commissary department. 



64 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Beef, mutton and veal have been mysteriously added to our rations, 
and yet we are under strict orders not to molest private property! 
Public need has often too little regard for private ownership, 
even in civil life. 

The story is told of an expedition similar to ours, but under 
more strict orders not to touch private property. An officer 
visiting a picket station discovered a freshly killed sheep hidden 
under a covering of brush. The officer called the picket's atten- 
tion to this and ordered him under arrest. The picket for want 
of a better defense said: "See here, Captain, do you suppose any 
goll durned rebel sheep can hop up and bite me, and live?" 

Earl} r in the war a general commanding a small expedition 
into "the enemy's land" issued an order protecting private prop- 
erty, mentioning that "if needed for cooking-fires, the top rail 
of fences may be used." As every rail became the top rail when 
the one above it was removed, it proved a poor protection to rail 
fences. 

May 26. Moved farther down the railroad and remained 
near a farm house for several hours and after sunset moved towards 
Suffolk. In conversation with this farmer we asked him whom 
he voted for at last presidential election. He said he did not 
know, voting as Colonel somebody told him to — this so-called 
Colonel being the "prominent citizen" of that vicinity. We asked 
him if he might have voted for Lincoln. He said, "There was no 
polls open for him," indicating that no votes for Lincoln were 
permitted. He said that after election he was at Suffolk and was 
told that Lincoln was elected by a big majority and that war 
was sure to come between the North and the South. He said 
he got into trouble by saying that probably those who voted for 
Lincoln would fight for him and as so many more voted for him 
than for the other side he was "afraid the South would get licked." 
The old man said that this logic made his hearers "hot mad" — 
they declaring that "One Southerner could lick a dozen Yankees." 

The farmer's wife and two grown-up daughters, all with pipes 
in their mouths, were carding and spinning cotton, and as they 
had a couple dozen pairs of coarse cotton socks of their own spin- 
ning and knitting, we bought them. Besides we gave them some 
sugar and coffee, something they had not seen for a long while. 
They were at first quite disturbed by our presence, but were soon 
at ease. The house was poorly furnished, but neat and clean. 
The farm consisted of several acres, but the portion cultivated 
was but a garden in size. It was evident that the women were 
more industrious than the man. He had never been farther from 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 65 

home than Norfolk, and that far but a few times and supposed 
that the City of New York was "same bigger than Norfolk." 

May 27. Reached our camp at Suffolk at Midnight and found 
orders to provide five days' rations and prepare to move — we 
are wondering where? 

These orders were countermanded a couple of days later and we 
commenced regular compan}' and battalion drills, including 
skirmish drill and bayonet exercise. The weather was very hot 
and camp very dusty. There is much sickness and many deaths 
in our brigade. Almost every morning the "Dead March" is 
heard escorting the body of some soldier to our camp cemetery. 

One of our officers advertised in the Waverly Magazine for a lady 
correspondent, that magazine making a specialty of such "ads." 
On our return to camp this officer found a large number of letters 
in response. He went along the line of officer tents and threw 
into several two or three of these letters, unopened, saying: 
"Perhaps these will amuse you." I had three for my share. Two 
of these were from silly young girls, but the other was a well- 
written and interesting letter well intended to cheer soldier-life. 
She claimed to be the widow of a brigadier general killed in battle. 
There were enough data scattered through the letter to "figure 
out" who her husband was. She admitted that she was giving 
a fictitious name, giving her address in care of a Washington 
street number. I wrote her a note explaining how I came by her 
letter and inclosing it to her, telling her husband's name and how 
I arrived at it. In due time I received a note in her real name 
thanking me for my courtesy in "rescuing" her letter. She said 
that she and a young lady friend read these advertisements and 
being interested in soldiers and knowing how the}- valued letters, 
they agreed to a haphazard selection from the advertisers to 
whom they would write. She was surprised that she had given 
data enough to reveal her identity. 

She was of an armv-known family and so was that of her hus- 
band, so prominent were they. She inclosed her card giving her 
home address and also her Washington address where she was 
visiting the family of a Congressman friend of hers. 

June o. Paid off up to April 30 by Paymaster, Major 
Sheridan. Our camp has grown into comfortable condition, but 
We still have shelter tents, and exposed to the sun as we are, we 
suffer from heat, and the four hours' drill each day is trying to 
our endurance. - 

Two of our popular lieutenants went home together on leave 
of absence and having returned, the following incident of their 



66 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

happy journey is current in camp. One of them must have told 
it in strict confidence. 

On their homeward way in New York City, they indulged in 
rations not common to camp life, which not being habitual 
resulted more mellifluously than expected. Each had a better 
measure of the other's condition than either had of his own. 

We will call them A and B "for short" — and for other reasons. 

Lieutenant A seriously considered Lieutenant B in no condition 
to care for his pocket-book and kindly proposed to take his money 
for safe keeping. 

Lieutenant B insisted that Lieutenant A was more unfit for 
the responsibility and that he (B) would take A's currency as 
the safer custodian. 

After amusing and more or less incoherent argument each 
finally took the other's pocket-book for mutual safety, a com- 
promise so abundantly satisfactory that they embraced each 
other in all the mellow tenderness of a new-found affection. 

June 12-16. Our regiment and most of our brigade were 
ordered out on another reconnoissance towards the Blackwater 
region. Fortunately I was left with about 250 men, most of them 
more or less ill, in command of the camp and escaped a sweltering 
march. Extra rations were sent out and several sick were brought 
in. Our regiment saw nothing of the enemy; but the 99th Xew 
York had a small skirmish and the body of Captain Hart of that 
regiment was brought in on the 16th. 

Shortly after our regiment left, our sutler received a lot of 
fruit — oranges, bananas, etc. — and took a mule-team load of 
it out to find the regiment, for the fruit would soon spoil. The 
heat was so great that one of his mules died and the regiment 
returning towards camp found the sutler and his "stalled" freight. 
The sutler, realizing his helpless situation, told the men to help 
themselves without cost, and in short order he was relieved of 
his goods. When joked about his losing enterprise he said: u Well, 
I've seen something of the country, anyhow." 

The regiment on this march again visited what is called " De- 
serted House," where in the early part of the war there was a 
small battle concerning which this story is told: Our force con- 
sisted of Corcoran's Legion, Spear's Cavalry and a battery of 
light artillery. Spear's Cavalry, in advance, became engaged 
and later Corcoran's Legion also. General Corcoran sent back 
an aide to hurry up the artillery. Returning, this aide observed, 
safely, to the rear, a soldier with his accouterments off, starting 
a fire, evidently to cook coffee and bacon. The aide rode to him 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 67 

and bluntly inquired, "Are you wounded?" The soldier was 
Irish, as quite all of Corcoran's men were, and coolly replied that 
he was not. Then said the aide: "Put on your accoutermer. :-.. 
take your gun and start for the front. Don't you hear the fixing 
and know that your comrades are fighting?" 

"Faith. I know it, all right. But. see here, Leftenant, it may 
do for Spear's Cavalry and single men out there, but 'tis no place 
for a man wid a family. It's the State of New York that's bein' 
filled wid widders just for Corcoran's glory. I'm no coward. I'd 
hev ye know, but I hev rispict for me family/' His argument 
did not prevail and he was forced to join his command. 

While in camp at Suffolk, Colonel Keese observed lights in 
some of our shelter tents one night aftei "taps" had sounded. 
It was the duty of the officer of the day to see to it that lights 
were out at taps. The Colonel asked the Adjutant who the 
officer of the day was, and being told that it was Captain Riggs, 
he ordered the Adjutant to re-detail him for the sam service 
next day. "for dereliction of duty." Captain Biggs was an excel- 
lent officer and a lawyer. His failure to have lights out that 
night was because of his need to quell a disturbance between 
some of our men and those of another regiment camped next to 
ours. He was willing enough to serve the unusual detail of a 
second day. but was hurt at the charge of "dereliction of du~; 
and denied the right of the Colonel to punish him without trial 
He. therefore, refused to serve the second day and did not, 
demanding trial by court martial or the cancellation of the order 
from the regimental record. The matter had a verv serious 
aspect, for the Colonel believed he had the right to make the order 
and to prefer charges against the Captain for refusing to obey it. 

There were four lawyers among our officers and all held that 
the Colonel had exceeded his authority in ordering Captain Riggs 
on extra duty as ■ punishment. The Colonel consulted General 
Peck in command of the district, a West Pointer, who said the 
Colonel did not have the right to punish an or: pt by 

. :r;ies and court martial, and so. later on. the obnoxious order 
was expunged. For a time the matter was much disc issed and 
with feeling; but it was soon forgotten and former friendships 
were resumed and continued. It took "grit" for the Captain 
to stand upon his rights and dare a quarrel with his Colonel, 
but Captain Riggs was equal to the oceasi n and the incident 
was helpful in many ways: especially in proving that there is a 
limit to the author'. n( lonels in command. 

Our camp life, with our marches, our "dog tents." lack of 



6S THREE YEARS WITH THE 

water for bathing or laundry., brought us to a vermin infested con- 
dition. In spite of our best efforts none of us escaped this really 
humiliating affliction. Later on in our experience* we considered 
it a badge of service to be u lousy"; but now it seemed too much 
to endure, even for our country. Many hesitated to admit the 
"visitation," but it was a prevalent condition and decidedly 
depressing for a while. We called them "graybacks," in honor of 
our enemy's uniform. They were an enemy, all right. 

June 18, 1863. Yesterday our brigade received marching 
orders. The 9th Vermont and 19th Wisconsin left at once, but 
our regiment and the 99th New York returned late last night 
after a hot and weary march of 22 miles, and did not leave until 
to-day, by train, for Norfolk at about 11 o'clock a.m. At Norfolk 
took the transport Utica for Fortress Monroe and there ordered 
to go on to Yorktown. Ran aground in Mob Jack Bay late in 
afternoon and having no pilot familiar with the river remained 
there over night, although high tide floated us. 

We had a good time, however, bathing in the York River, 
gathering oysters and eating them, even though June had no "R" 
in its spelling. Before sundown that afternoon we heard the music 
of a cow-bell on shore and it gave our farmer boys a " bucolic 
feelin'" and an appetite for genuine milk, so much so that three 
or four, including Sergeant Garrett of Company A, proposed low- 
ering a boat and going ashore for milk. This was done and reach- 
ing the shore they entered the buehes which hid the animal wear- 
ing the bell. We could hear the retreating bell as the boys pursued 
until it went beyond our hearing. After an hour the "milk raiders " 
returned and reported that after a long chase they discovered 
that the wearer of the bell was a bull! — hence no canteen had 
a drop of the lacteal. We considered it a laughable episode; 
even those who made the "raid" thought so. 

June 19. We reached historic Yorktown at about 2 p.m. and 
found several regiments encamped there with every appearance 
of a gathering force for some purpose and nothing short of Rich- 
mond seemed the ''objective," in our minds. Yorktown seemed 
quite an insignificant town to have figured so prominently in 
history. We brushed up our history enough to recall that here 
in 1781 Lord Cornwallis surrendered to Washington, a large and 
influential event of the Revolution; and here, a little more than 
a year before, it was evacuated by the Confederates after being- 
besieged by the Army of the Potomac, but that was only an incident 
in the unfortunate Peninsula Campaign of '62. 

Some of us were much interested in finding the notable 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 69 



"spots" in the historically interesting whole vicinity and sup- 
posed we found where Washington's headquarters were, where the 
surrender took place, etc., and yet we could not be too sure. 

We are told that the main street of Yorktown remains about 
as it was when Cornwallis surrendered — no change of consequence 
— and the look of the -street confirms the statement. 

We made our camp comfortable, drilled, had thorough in- 
spections and every day more troops arrived. 

I suffered from an unpleasant sore throat while at Yorktown; 
so bad that I could not command my company on drill — could 
not use my voice. 

The troops enjoyed bathing in the York River and it was a 
sight to see thousands doing all sorts of water "stunts." General 
John A. Dix and staff arrived by steamer one day and looked us 
over — sort of combined inspection and review. 

June 24. We have orders to be in readiness to move. Took 
down my tent in the morning, but put it up again at night. Our 
sutler is undergoing punishment for selling prohibited whiskey. 
He is riding a "wooden horse" made by a plank held up edgewise 
by "legs" of other planks, some twelve feet high. His sentence 
is for some hours of this humiliating and growingly uncomfortable 
equestrian "stunt." 

Our men, remembering his optimistic remark when he went 
out from Suffolk to meet us with a load of fruit, are comforting (?) 
him by suggesting that from his elevated position he is "seeing 
something of the country, anyway." 

June 25. The 9th Vermont and 19th Wisconsin left yesterday, 
which divides our brigade. Our regiment and the 99th New York 
become a "Provisional Brigade," Colonel Wardrup of the 99th 
commanding. 

June 26. At 3 a.m. we left our camp standing, and our equipage 
and baggage. All I took extra was my haversack and raincoat. 
As there were many transports in the river we felt sure that we 
would leave by steamer, but which waj r ? — perhaps to Washington 
via Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac, for Lee is again threaten- 
ing Pennsylvania. By 4 o'clock a.m. we were on board the trans- 
port Keuka and started up the York River; but perhaps this is a 
feint to deceive the watchful scouts and spies of the enemy, 
and perhaps later we may turn about. There were several trans- 
ports in our fleet and we kept going up the river and reached West 
Point where the Pamunkey and Mattapony join to make the York. 
Here we entered the crooked Pamunkey, at times so narrow that 
our steamer often touched the bordering tree branches on each 



70 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

side, and so crooked that steamers ahead of ours seemed going in 
a contrary direction and that, too, within shouting distance of 
each other. It has been said of this sinuous river that a steamer 
going north meets itself going south and exchanges signals to 
avoid collision! The country is flat, but we had a pleasant after- 
noon sail and reached White House, the head of navigation, at 
about 5 p.m. Other troops had preceded us and others followed. 
We debarked and went into bivouac near the ruins of the fine 
old mansion where Washington courted and won the fair and 
wealthy Widow Custis. Near by was a nearly completed fortifica- 
tion, arranged for running in guns mounted on platform cars from 
the railroad. If it had been completed and occupied our landing 
could have been seriously disputed. 

It began to rain at night and as we slept in a corn field, between 
the rows, without tents, we almost floated before morning. A 
large portion of us slept so soundly that we did not wake to the 
fact that we were lying in water. We were thoroughly soaked, 
but as it continued to rain we would have been soaked anyway. 

Here our Provisional Brigade was made a part of the 9th Army 
Corps and I was appointed Acting Inspector General on the brigade 
staff and at once proceeded with an inspection of the brigade, 
but retained command of my company. 

We had bought a barrel of flour at Yorktown for our mess. At 
White House, Hogan, our "mess boss," began baking pancakes 
for whoever would buy, selling them at mighty profitable prices, 
and our flour disappeared. However, we sympathized with 
Hogan's use of a profitable opportunity and forgave him, especially 
as we could not have taken the flour farther on this expedition. 

June 27. At night we crossed the Pamunkey and proceeded 
some distance as an advanced picket or outpost — the regiment 
being divided up on different roads, our company along the 
Richmond and York railroad. 

Spear's Cavalry was well in advance of us and sent in 10S 
prisoners, including General Fitzhugh Lee. They were turned 
over to our care for the night. Also captured a train of wagons, 
and mules and some 820,000 of Confederate currency. We 
''quartered" General Lee in an army wagon which sheltered him 
from the rain and we gave him of our best. He was a full-bearded, 
fine, resolute looking officer, but not inclined to conversation. 
In the morning we sent him back to White House landing, with 
the other prisoners. The news of his capture spread and was 
exaggerated to the extent Mil being reported that General Robert 
E. Lee had been captured; but that Lee was invading Penn- 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 71 



.2 



sylvania. Some dead and wounded of Spear'? Cavalry were also 
brought in. 

Troops kept arriving at White House and also a locomotive 
and platform cars for use on the railroad. Generals Dix and Kc yes 
also arrived by steamer which they used as headquarters. 

June 30. We were mustered for pay, and scattered as our 
regiment was, guarding different roads, it was difficult to complete 
the muster. 

Our company with three others of our regiment in command 
of Major Nichols was ordered to occupy Lanesville, King William 
County. We found only women living in this little hamlet and 
as our orders were to protect private property and non-combatants, 
these women were soon free from fear or apprehension and they 
grew T quite sociable and talkative. They were hungry for news 
and curious to look us over and learn why we were there. At 
night our company was sent out for a mile or so on the Bottom 
Bridge Road as a picket guard. 

July 1. Troops of all arms passed us this morning and our 
brigade fell in fcehind as rear guard. Made a short march to King 
William Court House and bivouacked. Left next morning at 
break of day, halting at noon. In spite of stringent orders for 
protection of property, depredations were committed and as rear 
guard we made several arrests of straggling depredators. 

We came to the burning remains of a dwelling from the windows 
of which our advance troops had been fired at, but no one was 
caught. Some furniture was saved and quite a number of books 
were scattered about the premises. At night one of our men 
brought me a book some 7 by 8 inches in size, which proved to 
be a young man's autograph narrative of a family journey by 
carriage from Virginia to as far as lake George, with several 
pages of crude water-color sketches. There were no dates, but it 
was evident that the trip was made many years ago. and the 
writer must now be quite old or "gathered to his fathers." I 
was interested because of its mention of places I knew something 
of and I made a few notes of its contents. 

In Xew York City they "put up at the Astor Tavern, a palatial 
and the most elegant tavern in America." Much was said of the 
"wonderful Hudson's river." 

They made their Northern stay of some weeks at the "San 
Souci Tavern, Ballston Spa,'' and "made drives to the medicinal 
springs at Saratoga, not whore the great battle was, but that 
Saratoga we also did visit, because of its historical interest." 

Quite much mention was made of a drive from Ballston to 



72 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Lake George, where the writer "was made a i beast of burden ' by 
the whim of the ladies, gathering pretty stones from the beach 
and cutting canes, all for souvenirs which they will later cast 
away." He regretted that ''attention to our ladies gave chance 
for only one sketch of the exquisite views the Lake afforded." 

I wanted to save the book, but could not very well carry it and 
presume it was not "toted" much farther by any one. 

July 3. Hot — roads dusty and we made a long and weary 
march to what is called Taylor's. Many men fell out from ex- 
haustion and it was difficult to force the march. At one time 
after dark we started singing " John Brown's body," which really 
helped the marching.* We reached Taylor's faun at about 

II p.m. and bivouacked in an extensive wheat field. Some of 
the grain had been cut and we made beds of it. Had never known 
our regiment to be so utterly "fagged"; but sleep came soon and 
sound, except to the unfortunate fellows detailed for picket. 
We have marched 25 miles to-day, suffering from extreme heat 
and dust. . 

July 4- Independence Day and hotter than yesterday! Our 
column is now reduced to our little brigade of two small regiments. 
Leaving our wagon train " tired-outs" and sick at Taylor's we 
pushed on towards Hanover Junction. The heat was so great 
that we halted in a woods across the Pamunkey for a couple 
of hours at midday. Some of our men were overcome by the 
heat and helped back to Taylor's. 

Near where we halted is a small corn-mill and in it a small 
quantity of corn. The mill was out of order, but some of our 
mechanics went at it and soon had it ready to grind. We thought 
that the repairs we made were worth all the corn in the mill, so, 
in spite of orders to protect property, we ground the corn and 
added a new item to our rations — corn meal. We boiled it in 
our tin cups, added a little salt, and it is seldom we have eaten 
anything with more relish than that hasty pudding. It made a 
4th of July feast! 

We reached Hanover Junction, north of Richmond, after dark 

* The singing brought very distinctly to my mental vision in the darkness 
the rugged fare of "Old Ossawatomie Brown," whom I one time met at 
court in Elizabethtown, N. Y. He was a juror from North Elba where he 
then lived and where his grave is. His stiff, iron-gray hair stood up a la pompa- 
dour above a strikingly rugged face, kindly in expression but with decided 
indications of resolute firmness. I was introduced to him. but found him, 
either from innate modesty or from purpose, retiring and reticent. His 
neighbors considered him odd. queer, "a little oil," as has been said of others 
with a one-idea obsession — his being hatred of slavery. He fought it while 
he lived, and "his soul goes inarching ou." 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 73 

- 

and, so far, had not been molested by the enemy, although our 
advance cavalry had several skirmishes along the way; but now 
we had no cavalry in advance — we were the advance in this 
direction. Near here along the South Anna River the enemy was 
found in some force with fortifications and artillery. 

Our Adjutant, Pruyn, acting as brigade Adjutant General, 
sent for Captains Norris, Riggs and myself and said he was going 

{to do us a favor; that four companies were to be sent out as 
skirmishers, to proceed along the railroad and ascertain the 
enemy's strength, and, if possible, to burn the railroad bridge, 
and he had selected our Companies A, D and F and one company 
of the 99th. I did not readily and enthusiastically appreciate 
the favor, but we were ready very soon and although tired from 
our hot march the thrill of what was before us made us forget 
our weariness. 

It was quite dark; the way was throtigh woods and bushes 
and it was difficult to keep our deployed men in line. As we 
approached the river, guided by the railroad, my company on 
the left, and emerging from a woods into a bushy clearing the 
enemy's batteries across the river opened fire. The shots went 
screaming over us, but our men dropped to the ground, at first, 
as if they had all been killed. Advancing a little farther we 
received musketry fire from opposing skirmishers forming a line 
in the bushes which reached beyond our. flanks, so we extended 
our line by a wider separation of our few men. We could only 
fire at the gun flashes, for we could not see the men "behind the 
guns." 

The artillery projectiles went over us, mostly, perhaps with 
the idea of reaching our reserves. Early in the action a solid 
shot struck Martin Sherman of Company A (Glens Falls) and he 
died from the wound. We gradually drove the enemy back towards 
the river, except in one spot directly in front of our company. 
This "bunch" of the enemy was evidently protected in some 
way and continued an annoying fire, although their line had 
retired from their right and left. 

We concluded that we would have to charge this particular 
spot; but Lieutenant Stevenson suggested that if three or four 
would volunteer to go with him, he would creep around behind 
this obstinate "bunch" and take them in rear. There were 
volunteers in plenty, but with three men he started and we ceased 
firing in that direction. Soon we heard pistol shots and Stevenson 
>!iouting: "Surrender or we'll murder every one of you! Drop 
your guns!" He mixed in (mite large "swear words," which need 



74 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

not be repeated. He killed one of the "bunch," wounded another 
and a dozen stalwart Georgians surrendered, not knowing how 
small the force was that demanded it. 

I called out to the Lieutenant and asked, "What's the matter?" 
and he replied, "I have captured the whole d— — d rebel army!" 
He brought the men in; twelve, one wounded. As they passed 
through our line a "sneak" came out of the bushes where he had 
been "skulking" and with clubbed musket struck one of the 
prisoners across his back. Stevenson knocked the "sneak" 
down, saying, "These are my prisoners and you can't abuse 
them. If you want some for your own use, go out there and get 
them." The assaulted prisoner, having his blanket roll over 
his shoulder and across his back, was not much hurt by this 
dastardly blow. 

About this time I was struck by a bullet in the hip; but it 
had evidently hit something before it hit me, for it was consider- 
ably spent and produced only a severe contusion of the sciatic 
nerve vicinity, resulting later on in a slight paralysis of my left- 
side, which continued, more or less, all through my army service 
and in a dwindling way for some time after. 

It was distinctly apparent that we did not have force enough 
to even reach the railroad bridge. We were ordered to fall back 
and join our brigade. It was nearing daylight of the 5th of July 
when we did so and started at once back to Taylor's farm, reach- 
ing there before noon. This action is called that of "South Anna 
Bridge." 

July o. We had a hot day's march yesterday, but not a long 
one; had our little skirmish and rapid march back with no sleep 
and we are a miserably tired-out lot — but we celebrated the 
Fourth of July! 

We find that in last night's affair Martin Sherman and Henry 
M. Willis were killed; Corporals C. C. LaPoint and Samuel Van 
Tassell and private Hiram Yatto, and two others, wounded; 
Edgar Comstock and Arad Mickle, missing (they were prisoners), 
making our casualties 10. The 99th lost one man, killed, with 
six missing. 

Do not know the enemy's casualties beyond the one man 
killed, one wounded and the twelve prisoners. 

These prisoners, to whom we have given of our best, both food 
and treatment, wanted to see the officer to whom they surrendered. 
They were all large, stalwart men, while Lieutenant Stevenson was 
below the average size. When Stevenson appeared, one of them 
said, "Well, Lieutenant, you seemed a mighty sight bigger last 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 75 

night than you do now." Stevenson replied, "I felt pretty big, 
myself, then/'* 

This was our first " close-up" engagement and although a 
small affair it had all the features of that sort of thing and we 
learned the fact that every shot from the enemy does not kill 
somebody. 

I remember finding in rear of our Camp at near Fort Ethan 
Allen one of our boys throwing stones at bottles- which he had 
set up on a stump. He explained that he was doing it to prove 
to himself that the chances were in favor of the bottles, conse- 
quently assuring him that the chances of escaping unhurt in battle 
were favorable. 

Some apparently reckless statistician has said that in war about 
a ton of metal is thrown for each man killed; but another more 
reasonable estimate is that metal equal in weight to the men killed 
is used to do the killing. 

There is quite a bit of fatalism among our soldiers. "You 
won't die till your time comes"; "The bullet that hits you will 
have your name on it"; "What's the use of worry? If you are 
to survive you will and if you are to be killed you can't dodge it," 
and such like expressions are common. 

July 6. Expecting pursuit we took an early start across coun- 
try to King William Court House, a severe march of some twenty 
miles in a soaking rain, which made the Virginia clay liquid and 
slipper}' and raised the streams we had to ford. Man}* removed 
their shoes and stockings, which ought not to have been permitted, 
for the grit in the clay wore through the skin of the feet, in many 
cases to bleeding. 

July 7. Another day of hard and "limpy" marching. We 
reached White House to-night with hope of taking transports 
from here. 

In our march from Taylor's farm we were followed by guerrillas 
or irregular cavalry. About all they accomplished was to gather 
up clothing which was thrown away to lighten the load of tired 
men. The knowledge of this pursuit was quite a spur to quicken 
our march and prevent straggling. 

The story is told of a man so thoroughly exhausted that he fell 
out insisting that he could not walk another step. His officers 
could not persuade him to make another effort, so he was left. 
Shortly after, he saw on a hill, some distance in rear, men on 
horses moving his way. The danger of capture put new life in 
him and he actually ran until he reached his company. Running 

* .Stevenson was promoted to First Lieutenant l< for gallantry in action." 



7G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

to his company, his Captain said, "I thought you couldn't walk 
another step." "Say, you don't call' this walking, do you? 7 ' 
replied the man. 

In spite of the condition of our men and the heat and fatigue 
of the march, I believe that we left but one man. during the march 
to be taken prisoner. 

At White House we heard the cheering news of Gettysburg 
and the surrender of Vicksburg, and it made our sore feet and tired 
bodies feel better — indeed it greatly revived our drooping spirits. 
Hearing good news is about as good as creating it. 

We had wondered what our expedition meant, what its purpose 
was. We now learn that General Dix had sent some 40.000 
troops by various routes, threatening Richmond from different 
points to prevent Confederate reinforcements being sent to Lee 
at Gettysburg and cause the return of some that had started. 

We have confident belief that Lee's Army will be prevented 
from recrossing the Potomac. 

July 8. In spite of our sore feet and "tired-out-ness," we 
w r ere not even permitted a day's rest; but some sixty of the most 
disabled were put on a transport with our quartermaster stores. 
We started at daylight this morning for Yorktown. The rain 
continued and going through mud and clay-slush we did not make 
many miles, although we toiled hard, even helping artillery out 
of hub-deep mud-holes. We rested for such midday "feed" as 
we had, at New Kent Court House and finally bivouacked for 
the night not far below that place. 

July 9. Took an early start, but were obliged to go slow. We 
have been and are rear guard to our column. The roads were in 
better condition to-day, but there are plenty of very sore feet. 
Towards night the 99th Xew York made a little "spurt" in their 
inarching which challenged us to keep up and with cheers we went 
into bivouac about three miles from Williamsburgh. 

On this march, as we have been before, we were troubled with 
wood ticks, those insect or vermin "brutes" that bury their 
heads in your flesh, usually leaving them there when you scratch 
the itching they produce, resulting in festering sores. A soldier 
with a decided foreign accent said: ''For der fighten' , an' driilin' 
I don't cares; but dese tarn wooden-tick, bedden-bug an' lousen, 
dey makes me sick — (ley am wuss dan der rebels is." 

July 10. We marched through historic Williamsburg and had 
glimpses of Baron Berkley's statue; the William and Mary 
College, in ruins; the House of Burgesses; Insane Asylum and the 
remains of the earthworks that halted McCiellan for a while 







Surgeon 
JOHN H. MOORES 




Assistant Surgeon 
JAMES G. PORTEOU 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT . 77 

in his Peninsula Campaign. When we remembered that this 
town was first settled in 1632, we felt that it might be considered 
ancient. 

We reached our former camp at Yorktown about sundown, 
lame, bedraggled, dirty and weary. W r e remained at Yorktown 
for a two days' rest, but it was difficult to get back our normal 
spring and elasticity — we seemed to grow more seriously ex- 
hausted after our strenuous experience and there was much real 
sickness from the strain. 

On our marches we found an abundance of blackberries, or 
il dew-berries," of which we ate freely and our surgeons say they 
did good in preventing intestinal troubles usual to such hot 
weather marches and bad water. The expedition was called 
"The Blackberry Raid" ever after. 

July 13. We were ordered across the York River to Gloucester 
Point to garrison Fort Keyes. The fort was pleasantly situated 
on a low bluff overlooking the York and equipped with Sibley 
tents for the men, and with other useful camp property left by 
the 4th Maryland, 

Mine is a wall tent on a gun-bed of the fort and makes a pleasant 
canvas home with a good outlook on the river. 

We remained at Fort Keyes for some time under General 
Wistar whose headquarters were across the river at Yorktown. 
The location proved unhealthful and we suffered much from sick- 
ness. Typhoid and other fevers prevailed and largely reduced 
our number of men for duty. This condition was unreasonably 
criticized by our commanding general and influenced our surgeons 
to some severitv in refusing to excuse sick men from dutv; but 
nevertheless our sick list grew and the death rate was large and 
increasing. Drilling was insisted upon, even though but few were 
able, and discipline and regulations were rigidly enforced by 
General Wistar, who became very unpopular. 

Our men provided themselves with unmilitary hats to protect 
them from the sun, but General Wistar ordered all these hats 
gathered and burned and our men had to do duty bareheaded 
until regulation caps could be procured, and these caps were poor 
sun protection. 

Rains were so frequent and heavy that they washed down the 
earthworks faster than we could repair them, so that extra fatigue 
duty was added to our other compeied activities. 

We had a picket line to care for, some distance out, commenc- 
ing on the York River below and following for some distance 



78 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

a winding creek, tide-water, and reaching back to the York above 
Gloucester, completely encircling the Point. It required about 
200 men for this service, but it was a pleasant service and only 
for a few days for each detail. 

There was a small tide-water grist-mill on this stream, or 
estuary, with a bridge, and here on Sunday mornings trading 
was permitted between the soldiers and inhabitants over the 
line. However, those who brought things for sale were almost 
wholly colored, although they sometimes were agents for white 
folks. This trading was done under supervision of the officer 
in command of the picket to prevent exchange of contraband 
and information. Fowls, eggs, fruit and garden truck, some- 
times fresh pork and mutton, were exchanged for sugar, coffee 
and good Yankee money; and so it was that the pickets and the 
garrison were able to add variety to their rations. Besides, 
there were plenty of oysters, clams, crabs and fish. Some of these 
colored people came many miles with their offerings, and many 
came without anything to sell, just to enjoy the gathering and a 
religious service which was usually held after the trading was over. 

One Sunday when I was commanding this picket line, the 
preacher was a very spare-built, small, crippled, wizened black 
man, but without negro features — a weird specimen of humanity. 
He was a free negro cobbler who had bought his freedom (which, 
being a cripple, was cheap) and that of his wife by being permitted 
to work at his trade through many years. After a long spell of 
singing their peculiar songs, ejaculatory prayers and a growing 
excitement, he began preaching. He could not read, but was 
really learned in the Scriptures and quoted much and pertinently 
and mainly quite correctly — once reciting nearly a whole 
chapter. 

He claimed to have in his possession an invisible ram's horn 
which had been used in the breaking down the walls of ancient 
Jericho, and he held his hand to his mouth as though he was 
shouting through this imaginary horn. He crouched down, 
sprang up, whirled about in an uncanny way and more sprightly 
than it would seem that his crippled legs would permit. He 
rehearsed the story of Jericho, with variations, and applied it to 
Richmond. In a really dramatic manner he represented the 
"Ark of the Lord" as being now carried "'round and 'round 
Richmond by His blue-coated priests a blowin' of ram's horns." 
and that the time was coining "when with a mighty blowin' an' 
a mighty shoutin' der City of Richmond would fall jess so easy 
as de Lord A'mighty does his wonders to perform." I said to 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 79 



him that I should think he would be in danger from preaching 
that sort of thing outside our lines. He said, "I am all the time 
talking like dat, but da all tink I'm out o' my haid and let me 'lone 
as bein' crazy." 

I was certainly impressed with this peculiar service and the 
concluding prophesy of the man with an invisible ram's horn 
of the original Jericho equipment. 

My friend Captain Riggs and his Company D were occasionally 
on picket with our Company F, and we sometimes went over 
by rowboat to a plantation home across this creek and bought 
our dinner. It was a pleasant household whose men folks were 
in the Confederate Army. The family at home consisted of the 
mother, a married daughter whose husband was a Confederate 
officer, and a younger daughter who was lively and attractive. 
We were always cordially treated, but with enough reserve to 
show that we did not belong to their " church." They were 
pleased to get our money and the coffee and sugar we gave them. 

The last time we had dinner there, the married daughter did 
not appear, and we noticed that one of the colored servants took 
a tray of food upstairs. Afterwards as we sat on the piazza for 
a few minutes we heard conversation from the open windows 
of an upper room. The thought occurred to us that her husband 
might be there on a visit. We had heard that he had been home 
not long before and that before now he had played the spy to 
our hurt, even taking a shot or more at our pickets. As we went 
through the garden to our boat we met an old " Mammy" who 
usually appeared for a "tip," and we asked her where the married 
daughter was. With an insinuating grin she said, "Oh, she's 
enjoyin' de company of a rebel chap dat done come few days ago." 

This seemed to confirm our anxious suspicion and we hurried 
over the water and sent men across below, to get in rear of the 
house, planning to go back and capture the husband. We took 
two men with us to be in the garden for use if needed. All was 
quiet in the house when we entered. We went up stairs meeting 
the young daughter at the top, who, surprised, asked what we 
wanted. We hastily told her what we suspected, when she broke 
out in rollicking laughter. "Yes, indeed," she said, "there is a 
rebel fellow in that room with my sister and I'll introduce you." 
With our hands on our pistols we followed, wondering at her 
hilarity. She opened a bedroom door, entered and gravely bowing 
said with provoking comicality, "Come right in, but don't shoot! 
My! what big guns." Her sister was in bed and on a pillow beside 
her was a sleeping infant. "He's a sure enough rebel," she said. 

t 









SO THREE YEARS WITH THE 

"but we can't spare him.'' and she resumed her exasperating 

laughter; and the .-ister, comprehending the situation, smiled 
as broadly as a weak woman could. The young Miss continued: 
4 "Look under the bed. search this closet," throwing open a loor, 
"go through the house, you may find a really great big rd - 
here of about your size.''' 

Of course we were chagrined and tried to apologize: but 
successfully. She continued her rattling talk which did not a 
much to our composure: followed us through the garden and 
finally said: "'You better keep an eye on that house over the 
pointing to a house in the distance, "'for they expect a little rebel 
there 'most any day." 

The provoking little minx stood on the shore as we pulled o~ 
with our extra men, bubbling with laughter, and shouted. ' 
over to dinner just the same, won't you?'"' We replied that we 
would, but neither of us ever picketed then rain. We after- 
wards wondered whether, after all. the Confederate husband 
might not have been somewhere in the house, and whether we were 
not '"rattled"'' in our purpose by this resourceful Utile maid. We 
did not report our brave '"raid" to any one; but that evening 
we sent over a good supply of coffee and sugar with "Our compli- 
ments, in honor of the new recruit for the Confederate 

This picket line was instructed to be particularly watchful 
especially during low tide at rright, lest the enemy's scouting 
cavalry or guerrillas make a dash across and surprise us. Early 
one morning, just before daylight, firing was heurd on one pall 
of the line. Our reserves were hurried to the - : end a cavalry 
messenger rode back to the fort, putting the troops there in : 
ness. The alarm was occasioned by some large fish, said to be por- 
poises, coming in at high tide and becoming stranded in a shallow 
part as the tide went out. Their active splashing in the darkn-. — 
had the sound of horses coming through the water — another 
instance of "hearing things in the dark." 

Our first Colonel. Samuel T. Richards, had not been with us 
since we left Washington because of rheumatism. Hi? condition 
had not improved, indeed he never fully recovered. He re-:_: 
July S. and, of course, lieutenant Colonel Keese will succeed 
him, and Major Nichols will be Lieutenant Colonel. The field 
officers and a few of the lino . i - had in mind one of our Captains 
for Major, and he would make a pood one. ui . _ nt 

was in course of organization at Piattsburgh under Lieutenant 
Pruyn. representing the Governor, he rendered such satisfactory 
service and the ueed of his experience and al - ?med so de- 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 81 

sirable that he was persuaded to accept the Adjutancy of the 
regiment with our promise that he would be made Major when 
a vacancy came. Most of the line officers felt the obligation of 
this promise. A meeting of our officers was held and a vote taken, 
Pruyn receiving a majority of several votes. . But as the field 
officers favored the Captain, Colonel Keese, securing a short 
leave of absence, went to Albany to recommend the Captain's 
appointment. 

Those who favored Pruyn made up a statement of the officers' 
vote, setting forth the promise made to him. This document, 
signed by the officers voting for Pruyn, was sent to his mother, 
an influential Albany lady, and she promptly took it to Governor 
Seymour, who at once made the appointment of Pruyn. When 
Colonel Keese reached Albany and presented his recommendation, 
he was advised that the appointment of Major Pruyn had been 
made. 

Naturally this division of opinion and its result caused some 
regimental friction; but be it said to the credit of the defeated 
officers, it was finally pleasantly accepted and all was forgotten 
in a few weeks. There were many other instances which evidenced 
the fine respect for harmony and mutual good-will which prevailed 
in our regiment and which added to the pleasure of serving in it. 

Serious sickness continued, many deaths occurred and we 
felt that our stay at Gloucester Point was a needless waste of 
lives. Our post hospital was full and many sick "in quarters. " 
General Wistar was, we thought, hard on us in being loath to 
send even our sick to healthfully located hospitals; yet 76 of 
the sick were sent to Hampton Hospital, Fortress Monroe, at 
one time and 75 at another. Five men of the 99th New York 
died during one twenty-four hours, and other deaths occurred 
almost daily. We regarded it as a crime to be kept in this malarious 
location which was not threatened by or much in danger from the 
enemy. 

Captain Riggs had a siege of typhoid fever at Gloucester Point 
and this, with a serious physical disability which he had suffered 
from for a long time and which a less resolute man would have 
considered disabling, made him resign, and a splendid man and 
officer left us. While he was convalescent his law partner, Judge 
Brown of Glens Falls, and Riggs' mother visited him. Judge 
Brown shared my tent during his stay, and thus commenced one 
of the most appreciated and valuable friendships I ever enjoyed. 

We had asked General Wistar to recommend our removal to a 
more healthful locality, but he refused. We appealed to Fortress 



82 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Monroe, our Department Headquarters, but General Wistar 
prevented favorable action there. We finally put our unhappy 
condition before Congressman Kellogg. He acted influentially 
and came to us himself backed by War Department orders, result- 
ing in our removal to a convalescent camp at Norfolk, a colored 
regiment taking our place. 

October 2. Orders came to move and every man who could 
walk with help went to the wharf. Because transportation was 
not provided till towards night, the regiment waited on the 
wharf through the heat of the day, and even well men felt the 
bad effects of the exposure. 

While at Gloucester Point we received about 100 convalescents, 
our men, from Washington hospitals, and they were in fine condi- 
tion. We also shared in two tedious reviews, one in honor of 
Major General Foster of North Carolina and the other in behalf 
of Major General Nagley, the new Department Commander 
succeeding General Dix. We also participated in three reconnois- 
sances more or less fatiguing. Some of the days showed a 99 
degree heat with 83 at midnight. We never forgot our Gloucester 
Point " purgatory." 

Norfolk was reached and a good camp found. Standard tents 
were given us and shortly improved health was manifest. The 
camp was named "Camp Barnes" in honor of General Barnes, 
commanding at Norfolk. 

Before the removal to Norfolk my malarial condition grew 
worse and with the continued peculiar effects of my wound, I 
was scared}' able for full duty. Colonel Keese urged me to apply 
for a thirty days' leave of absence and I did, and on Sundav p.m., 
August 30, I started for the North — for home! I grew worse 
as I traveled and went to bed when I reached New York for a 
couple of days, and reaching Essex took to bed again for several 
days. 

Improvement was slow notwithstanding the care and helpful- 
ness of friends, physician and the stimulating pleasure of my 
surroundings. I gained so little that I had my leave extended 
to October 30th. I continued under a physician's care and began 
to feel better about the middle of October; but did not feel well 
when I started back to the regiment. Some of my friends advised 
that I resign and remain home, as my health did not promise 
that I would be of much service in the army. Just before return- 
ing I was called on by the mother of a soldier lad, coming some 
miles to have me take a small package to her son. The boy was 
in the 119th N. Y. regiment, and as mv regiment was the 118th 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 83 

she reasoned that they were located next each other. When I ex- 
plained that the 119th was down New Orleans way, she took her 
package back home. 

Returning I had a couple of days in New York and heard 
Edwin Forrest at Niblos' in "Damon and Pythias" — something 
1 to be remembered. 

I reached camp at Norfolk, October 23, a week ahead of the 
expiration of my leave, and was glad to be in camp; really feeling 
physically better than on any clay during my absence. I found 
that I had been promoted to the Captaincy of Company D, 
taking the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Captain 
Riggs. 

Part of our regiment was stationed at Portsmouth in command 
of Major Pruyn. 

I was mustered as captain, October 27, and as Captain 
Livingston (whom we left in hospital at Washington, ill of typhoid 
fever) came back October 29, I reluctantly left Company F, 
which during the illness of our captain, from April 20, I had 
commanded. 

Just before I returned from my leave our regiment had the 
unpleasant duty of executing, by hanging, a Dr. Wright, a 

I prominent Norfolk physician, who shot to death a lieutenant of 
colored troops, because he refused to discontinue drilling his 
men on the street where Dr. Wright resided. 

October 30. Regiment participated in receiving General Foster, 
Department Commander, and General Schenck of Baltimore. 

Some of my Company D men brought me to-night some delicious 
honey in the comb. I did not ask where or how they got it, 
although quite satisfied that it was not supplied by our commissary 
department. 

It reminded me of a boyhood incident, which I remember 
quite distinctly, with its atmosphere and fragrance of a lazy, 
hazy, golden autumn day-off for a tramp with a quaint elderly, 

I "woodsy-wise," companionable fellow who occasionally appeared 
in our vicinity. He was a mixture of farmer, tinker, hunter, 
trapper and other vocational ingredients; but this "day we were 
after wild honey ■ — to locate bee trees. 

He had his little box of honey to decoy the bees from the wild 
flowers and watch them from wide-apart spots as they spiraled 
up, honey-laden, and darted off in a "bee-line" for their forest 

!hive, located where these lines converged or crossed. His keen, 
practiced vision and sense of direction were about as accurate as 
a theodolite. 



84 THREE YEARS WITH THE 






One ''lead*' took us some distance to a farmer's hives, which 
was disappointing; but we finally located a hollow tree wherein 
bees lived and carried on their business. He marked this tree, 
knowing that this marking would, under the unwritten honor law 
of the woods, save it from any subsequent finder's spoliation. 

This peculiar man had, as he himself admitted, " quite some" 
knowledge of the Bible and was particularly interested in the 
Patriarch Jacob. At our luncheon that day he discoursed of 
Jacob's "thrifty doin's." Among other things he said: "Jake 
was about as shrewd as they make 'em — perhaps a bit too tricky 
for a bee hunter; but he had a head on him, was far-sighted 
and knowed things. It was a bright think uv hisen when he wus 
sendin' presents to that high munkey-munk who had a corner 
on grain down in Egypt, thet he diden't know wus his own dreamer- 
son Joseph; but the Lord knowed. an' inspired Jacob to send 
things to remind Joseph uv his boyhood home — Land of Canaan 
things — fruit, balm, nuts and sich. But his bright think wus when 
he sed: 'Boys, take a little honey,' so 'mong them other things 
they took honey." 

Pointing his right fore-finger at me, the other fingers of the 
same hand clutching a partly eaten sandwich, he continued: 
"My boy, take it from me, right now, an' don't yer never forgit 
it, honey kin make yer more friends nor hard cider kin. Yes sir-ee! 
Sweetness is a better bait fur peace and good-will 'mong men 
then sourness. The honey-way 'round home pervents family 
troubles an' cures 'cm when they've come. 

"Jacob knowed all about honey when he told his boys to take v 
a little uv it with 'em. 

"Say, it wus the thinkin' uv the Promised Land a flowin' with 
milk and honey thet made them folks in the wilderness — with 
their stiddy diet — same thing every day — thet made 'em 
anxious with a longing to git there. It was a cute way uv ma-kin' 
'em 'predate where they wus bound fur and help 'em endure 
them forty years." 

I joined my friend and his helper when he "raided" this bee 
tree after the honev making season was over. The vield was 
several pails of honey, taken mostly in the comb. Of course I 
had all I could eat (an unhappy sufficiency) and a liberal quantity 
to take home. 

It seemed a brutal proceeding, the strangling of this colony with 
the fumes of burning sulphur and robbing it of the product of 
a summer's work, just as it had retired for a winter's rest; but it 
wasn't this thought that made me feel so badly inside and made 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 85 



the few miles homeward such a trying journey. Jacob sent a 
little honey — I had eaten too much! 

In felling the bee tree we found another cavity, higher up 
than the one occupied by the bees, with its opening on the side 
opposite the bee entrance, which a family of squirrels had pre- 
empted for a home and provisioned with at least a peck of hickory 
nuts for winter. So it was we despoiled the forest homes of 
two industrious colonies and carried away their provident supplies 
— but how innocent compared with the atrocities of war! 

November 1. Sunday. Regiment attended Christ Church, 
Norfolk, this morning. Church built in 1719. Regiment made 
a fine appearance in new uniforms, side arms and white gloves. 
General Barnes and staff worshiped with us. Chaplain, had 
vesper service in camp in the late afternoon. 

November 4- All but Companies A, B, F and D joined the 
companies at Portsmouth, and -Major Pruyn was transferred from 
Portsmouth to command the four companies remaining at Nor- 
folk, regimental headquarters being transferred to Portsmouth. 

November 6. Paid off by Major King, paymaster, and moved 
camp to the entrenchments — our four companies — and picket 
service was added to our duties. Part of Company H is stationed 
at Cape Henry. 

November 14-. Our detachment went over to Portsmouth so 
that all of our regiment is together again. We are quartered in 
railroad shops and car houses — all quite comfortable for winter. 

Captain Livingston and myself arranged for quarters and board 
in a private dwelling, quite to our liking. 

We remained in Portsmouth till December 11th and considered 
ourselves favored. We continued our drills and did picket service 
some distance outside the city. Sometimes it was cold and rainy, 
but most days quite pleasant for winter. 

The health of the regiment has greatly improved, and with 
constant drilling and camp discipline the officers and men seem 
to be at their maximum of military efficiency. While our numbers 
have decreased, it is plain that the regiment has, as a whole, a 
larger aggregate efficiency than ever before. 

Drill and discipline are army essentials. In a crisis of danger 
there is no telling whether the higher or lower ''instincts" of a 
man will prevail. He may show splendid courage or yield to an 
instinct of personal discretion. Habit is more trustworthy in 
such case than judgment, and drill and discipline form a habit 
of order and soldierly bearing. If in danger you keep your head, 
you will do well anyway; but if you lose it, the drill habit will 



86 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

I 

carry you through. Cavalry horses have been known to keep 

their places in action after their riders have fallen, the result of 

having been thoroughly drilled. 

December 11. Companies A, B, D, E, F and H received orders 
to take transport at noon; but it was 6 p.m. before the steamer 
Express arrived. Two companies of the 21st Connecticut went 
on board with us. At Newport News we remained on the steamer 
over night. We landed in the morning and lay around all day 
waiting for the rest of the regiment and for tents and baggage, 
which came near night when camp was hurriedly arranged. A big 
wind with rain visited us in the night, but we did not get badly 
drenched. The tents of the Field and Staff blew down and com- 
pelled the occupants to find shelter with the line officers. 

I clipped to-day from an old Washington paper the following 
account of an interview with General Sickles which interested 
me as evidencing the religious faith of President Lncoln: 

"It was on the 5th day of July, 1863," said General Sickles, '"that I was 
brought to Washington from Gettysburg, suffering from an amputated leg. 
President Lincoln came to my room and s:it down by my bedside. He asked 
about the battle, and when I told him of the terrible slaughter, tears filled 
his eyes. I asked him if he had doubted the result. He said, 'No.' Then he 
continued: 'This may seem strange to you, but a few days ago, when the 
opposing armies were converging, I felt as never before my utter helplessness 
in the great crisis. I went to my room and locked the door. I knelt and 
prayed as I had never prayed before. I told God that He had called me to 
this position; that I had done all that I could do, and that the result was in 
His hands; that I felt my own weakness and lack of power, and that I knew 
that if the country was to be saved, it was because He so willed it. The burden 
seemed to roll off my shoulders; my intense anxiety was relieved and in its 
place came a great sense of trustfulness, and that was why 1 did not doubt 
the result 'at Gettysburg. And, what is more. Sickles,' he continued, 'I 
believe that we may hear at any moment of a great success by Grant, who has 
been pegging away at Yickshurg for so many months. By to-morrow you will 
hear that he has won a victory as important to us in the "West as Gettysburg 
is in the East.' Then turning to me, he said: 'Sickles, I am in a prophetic 
mood to-day. and I know that you will set well.' 'The doctors do not give 
me that hope, Mr. President,' I said; but he answered cheerfully, 'I know 
you will get well.'" 

General Sickles lived in Glens Falls in his boyhood and after the war oc- 
casionally visited us and Lake George. On one such occasion I called his 
attention to this clipping which he pronounced fairly correct, adding: "The 
President's prophecy of my recovering very much encouraged me and helped 
me to recover." 

Xovembcr 13. Sunday, but have worked all day to get our 
camp in shape. 

A few days later we began to stockade our tents with "shacks" 
or long, shingle-like splittings of pine or cypress. We finally had 
a fine looking and comfortable camp again. 

All our officers have wall tents and most of us have built chim- 
neys in their rear for the comfort of an open fire. These chimneys 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 87 

are mostly built of sticks of wood filled in between and plastered 
outside and inside with clay, a good enough temporary mortar. 
Some have good draught while others at times smoke, for there 
is a knack in building them. 

Lieutenant Boynton of Company K finished, his chimney one 
day, boasting a little that he knew how a chimney should be built. 
As he was about to start a fire a crowd of us gathered about his 
tent, insisting that his chimney wouldn't "draw," that it would 
smoke him out, etc., and a small bet was made. As he went in 
with his kindlings and wood to start a fire and win his bet, we 
put a prepared board of the right size on top of his chimney, and 
a larger crowd gathered for the fun. Soon the smoke came pour- 
ing out of his tent and he came out with it, choking and rubbing 
his smarting, tearful eyes and not a bit comforted by the boister- 
ous laughter of the crowd. He had the courage to try it again, 
but finally said, "I give it up, I lose my bet." He was encouraged 
to try it once more — the dampness of the newly-built chimney 
might be the cause. He went in for a third time and the board 
being removed, behold! it worked beautifully. It was a small 
incident but, like many other similar, it produced jolly amusement 
— as "good as a circus." 

Of course, some of our quarters are better than others, for there 
is individuality in their construction. Some have the knack of 
"doing things" and the ambition to do them. 

Here we are attached to General Heckman's Brigade — the 
23d and 25th Massachusetts, 21st Connecticut and 9th New 
Jersey, with cavalry and artillery, quite a complete military unit. 

There are only a few small houses hereabouts, but the location 
is fine, giving a good view of Hampton Roads and recalling the 
naval battle fought here and that wonderfully opportune arrival 
of the Monitor. The topmasts of one of the wooden war vessels 
sunk by the Merrimack show above the water near us. We have 
a fine marine picture to look out upon, this broad view with 
anchored and moving vessels always in sight. 

December 21. Am detailed by Major General Butler to serve 
on a court martial, Colonel Pickett, 25th Massachusetts, as 
president. 

The court convened mornings for many days, the officers of it 
attending to their regimental duties afternoons. We tried several 
soldiers on various charges. One case was that of Private Fuller 

I of Company C of our regiment for desertion. He had overstayed 
his furlough on a visit home, with evidence that he did not intend 
to return. He was arrested and brought back. He was guilty 



88 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

and so found. The court only decided the guilt, the punishment 
was the province of the Department Commander, General Butler. 
While the army regulations fixed death as the punishment for 
desertion, the practice had been to punish desertion of this sort 
by imprisonment; so we were shocked when General Butler 
approved the finding of the court martial and ordered the man 
to be shot within forty-eight hours! This brought gloom to our 
regiment. Colonel Keese, our Chaplain and myself went to 
Fortress Monroe, saw General Butler and plead for. a change in 
his order, substituting imprisonment for death, urging that 
similar offenses, the overstaying of furloughs, even when inten- 
tional, had not been, so far, punished by death. 

General Butler was pleasant, but he showed us the record of 
those of his command then " absent without leave" and the 
figures were startling. He said he had decided to punish by death 
the first case that came from a court martial, and while he was 
sorry that it involved our regiment, he felt that the full penalty 
must be inflicted in order to prevent this "leak" in army efficiency 
by bringing absentees back to their regiments and making others 
respect their furloughs. 

Our Chaplain then asked for an extension of the time for Fuller's 
execution, saying that the man was not prepared to die. " Every 
soldier," said General Butler, "should always be prepared to die, 
for death is a soldier's reasonable expectation." 

This was on the day before that set for the execution. Return- 
ing to camp we telegraphed Congressman Kellogg of the situation 
and asked his aid. Mr. Kellogg did not get the telegram till 
quite late that night, but he proceeded at once to the White 
House where he was told that President Lincoln was not feeling 
well and had retired unusually early. Mr. Kellogg insisted that 
he must see him in a matter of life and death, and succeeded. 
He met the President, who was only partly dressed, told him 
his mission and asked that he order the execution of Fuller post- 
poned until the circumstances of his case could be investigated. 
The President urged that that was asking a good deal — it might 
be a case of necessary discipline of importance to General Butler's 
command — and asked what reason Kellogg had to justify inter- 
ference. Mr. Kellogg said that it might be that the man deserved 
death, "but this man belongs to what I call my regiment, wholly 
raised in my congressional district, consisting of my constituents, 
and I do not, propose that any man in it shall die if I can. prevent 
it," adding that the President would feel the same if in his, Mr. 
Ke Hogg's, place. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 89 

The President admitted the reasonableness of Mr. Kellogg's 
request and said that he would try to carry out Mr. Kellogg's 
wish. The next morning the President sent Mr. Kellogg his 
card, briefly noting thereon that the matter had been attended to. 
This card — just the President's calling card with a few written 
words — I have seen it, being then in possession of Mr. Kellogg's 
son, Hon. R. C. Kellogg of Elizabethtown, N. Y., who had himself 
served in our regiment. 

General Butler was ordered by the War Department by tele- 
graph to suspend the execution of Fuller and forward all papers 
connected with the case to Washington. General Butler's counter- 
manding order reached us as arrangements were about completed 
for the execution — and to our joy! The result was that Fuller's 
sentence was finally commuted to three years' imprisonment; 
but he was released when the war ended. 

This is but another of the multitude of incidents manifesting 
the sympathy, kindness and gentle spirit which enlarged Lincoln's 
greatness and another instance of Mr. Kellogg's "fatherly'"' 
interest in our regiment. 

Our court martial adjourned January 14, 1864. 

During our stay at Newport News we were active in drilling — 
company, battalion, skirmish and picket — and in completing 
camp, which became excellent winter quarters. 

Our Captains have had their "turns" in commanding regimental 
drills and most of them showed proficiency. In fact we felt that 
we were approaching the quality of regulars. The harmony and 
good feeling which have all along been a delightful feature in our 
regiment, continued to a "happy-family" degree. Officers were 
considerate and men were respectful, and while good discipline 
was maintained, there was a degree of camaraderie between men 
and officers not found in most volunteer regiments, and in regulars 
scarcely at all. 

The Virginia winter was kindly, although there were chilly 
days and cold nights, chilling rains and occasional snow. We had 
one snowstorm, a couple of inches, followed by rain and freezing, 
making slippery walking and good sleighing. An artillery com- 
pany rigged up an improvised "drag" drawn by four artillery 
hordes. Loaded with men and carrying the flag it attracted 
much attention as the men drove through the camps with hilarity. 
It was a poor sort of sleigh-ride, but they had lots of fun and made 
fun for others. The snow remained for a couple of davs. 

About the middle of January we received some 80 recruits 
from Elmira, who were distributed among our several companies. 



90 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Our boys were much amused over the complaints of these recruits 
of their treatment en route. They had slept on steamer decks and 
ridden in freight cars, had not seen any butter or soft bread, etc. 
They were condoled and sympathized with in mock seriousness and 
assured they would find a favorable difference in their treatment 
now. Apologies were made for our poor accommodations, but they 
were told that our spring beds, mattresses, crockery and much else, 
that we never had, had not arrived from our previous camp; that 
butter, eggs and fresh meat were scarce just then, etc. 

These recruits, however, soon found that ordinary home or 
hotel food and comforts did not obtain in the army. 

So it was with all of us at first ; we complained of lots of things 
during our first few months' service, accepting worse conditions 
afterwards as matters of course and with thankfulness that they 
were not worse. 

Generel Heckman was relieved of command of our brigade and 
Colonel Dutton of the 21st Connecticut, being the senior officer, 
took command. 

The night of January 19 was very cold and a fierce wind 
stirred up Hampton Roads. The flapping of our tent flies made 
conversation in ordinary tones difficult and sleep fitful. In the 
morning we received orders to be ready to march. It seemed 
hard to leave our comfortable quarters, completed with so much 
labor; but it was soldier life in war time, and we hurriedly made 
ready. That night there was much jollity in camp, much singing 
and laughter, for our camp routine was broken and the exciting 
expectation of something new was in the air. We were serenaded 
by the glee club and string orchestra of the 21st Connecticut 
and "high jinks'' reigned beyond the hour of taps. 

One of the men of another camp had a new tent-mate, a German 
recruit afflicted with a stertorous snore. The man complained 
to the German that his awful snoring prevented sleep and got 
this comforting reply: "Yen yoiise got list to dot schnores it 
dond troubles you some more. Dot vas so mit mine own selef — 
I dond any more knows it ven I schnores." 

Our camp was so pleasant and comfortable that several wives 
of officers were in camp; but they were sent away on our receiving 
marching orders. One of these wives, of another regiment, amused 
the camp and irritated her husband by coming oat of their tent 
when she had prepared a meal and calling in a shrill voice to 
her mate: "Lovey! lovey, dear! goodies are ready. " Yery soon 
the men. all over our camp, were mimicking this affectionate 
"call" as a supplement to the regular bugle mess calls. 




Lieutenant and Quartermaster 
PATRICK K. DELANEY 



>"■" 



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SIMMS 

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* 




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.J 



Private WARREN MONTY 

Co. F. listh X. V. Vols. 

Showing field service uniform 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 91 

January 21. This morning tents were struck and before noon 
we were tramping up the Peninsula again. After marching some 
20 miles, one of our hard " hikes/' we bivouacked very tired; 
but coffee, hardtack and salt pork refreshed us. The day had been 
pleasant, but the night was freezing cold and. the ground hard, 
so sleep did not prove to be "Nature's sweet restorer/' to any 
refreshing extent. 

We started again by daylight in the morning somewhat stiff 
in our joints, and marched to within two miles of Yorktown. 
Here we remained until dark and made a night march of 
14 miles to Williamsburg. We were joined by about ISO men 
of the 25th Massachusetts and later by 74 men of the 11th 
Connecticut who had declined to reenlist, their present enlistment 
near ending. 

We arrived at Williamsburg at after midnight. It was a hard 
march, much of it through woods which made the darkness darker, 
and there was much stumbling and uncertain footing; yet few 
dropped out. Only about 20 of the 25th Massachusetts detachment 
arrived with us, but all came in the next morning. 

January 2J+. Many of the First Mounted Rifles, already here, 
visited us to-day and had with them a captured or surrendered 
Confederate who had been leading some of our scouting parties. 
I certainly do not "take" to him and wouldn't put much con- 
fidence in him. A detachment of the Rifles had been further up 
the Peninsula and one of their sergeants was killed at "12 Mile 
Ordinary." His body was brought back and buried at Williams- 
burg. Troops keep on coming. Evidently some enterprise is 
in preparation. 

January 25 to February 4- Our tents arrived and a temporary 
camp was made behind a hill near Fort Magruder, out of sight 
of Confederate scouts. The location overlooked York Creek on 
which, and the York River, a barge made daily trips to Yorktown 
for supplies, etc. The weather was fine during our stay at Wil- 
liamsburg and we were kept at our drilling and enjoyed it. 

For three days I was in command of the picket line — two 
companies of infantry and a detachment of cavalry. The last 
night on picket we observed signal rockets from inside the town, 
repeated beyond us, blue, yellow and red lights, which seemed to 
say, "Yankee infantry, cavalry and artillery are gathering here." 
Investigation was made, but the party giving the signals or the 
building from which they were sent could not be located. 

W hen our pickets were relieved I took the men, all having 
loaded rifles, out for a one-shot target practice and Waters of 



92 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Company D made the best shot. While we were at Newport News 
General Heckman offered a medal for the best results at target 
practice and Sturges of Company D won it. Company D was 
not the most military looking company in the regiment, but it 
had good " shots," fine endurance and splendid fighting material. 

February 6. Orders came detailing me as Provost Marshal of 
Williamsburg, relieving Major Wheelan of the Mounted Rifles. 
I at once reported to Colonel West commanding the district who 
sent his Adjutant General with me to take possession of the office 
in the " House of Burgesses." Am confidentially informed that the 
expedition gathering here is intended to make a sudden dash 
across the Chickahominy and into Richmond to release Federal 
prisoners held in that city, and everything depends upon making 
the dash a surprise. General Wistar will be in immediate command 
under General Butler. 

February 6. Early this morning the expedition marched 
through the city, infantry, cavalry and artillery. General 
Graham is left in command of the district. The expedition 
consists of about 5000 cavalry, 4000 infantry and artillery. 

About noon General Butler and staff arrived and two of his 
staff, Colonel Ludlow and Major Davis, took luncheon with me. 
General Butler gave me some verbal instructions, particularly 
in the matter of finding out who of the inhabitants, almost wholly 
women, were the most bitter Confederate sympathizers and 
likely to risk most to render service to that side. I did not feel 
like being very active in this regard, for it was evident that all 
were sympathizers and quite every family was represented in 
the Confederate army. 

Williamsburg is indeed a historic spot, having been the capital 
of Virginia from 1700 to 17S0. Its Lunatic Asylum was quite 
an institution and the first of its kind in this country. Its William 
and Mary College is the oldest college in the United States, except 
Harvard, and was in 1770 the wealthiest college 4 in America, 
but now in ruins. The buildings were designed by Sir Christopher 
Wren, the notable English architect, and it was for a time the 
headquarters of Rochambeau. Among its students were Jefferson. 
Monroe, Chief Justice Marshall and other distinguished Ameri- 
cans, and it was the birthplace of the famed Phi Beta Kappa 
fraternity. As the capital of Virginia, Williamsburg was a con- 
spicuous social and political center in early times and the rendez- 
vous of Virginians conspicuous and influential in our early history. 
The town consists of three nearly parallel streets with many 
pleasant and some pretentious homes — some of historic note. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 93 

I had many calls, mostly from women, and was impressed with 
their gentility and patience with their unhappy condition. One 
lady gave me interesting glimpses of the early part of the war, 
when Williamsburg was gay with Confederate soldiers under 
General Magruder. She told of balls, receptions and social 
strenuosity with nothing too good for the soldiers. She mentioned 
a ball given at Fort Magruder when the road from Williamsburg, 
then lined with fine trees, was illumined on both sides with candles, 
bayonets stuck in the ground being used as candlesticks — al- 
together a brilliant and memorable function. She said no one 
seemed to sense the seriousness of the war and all seemed obsessed 
with the belief that the martial spirit of the South would whirl 
the conflict to a quick victory. She said the " Yankees'' were so 
much misrepresented that they came to be seriously regarded as 
uncivilized brutes with ferocious and repulsive features and 
natures — that women had better kill themselves rather than fall 
into their hands. She said, "I ought to have known better, for 
I was two years in a Philadelphia school," but even she came to 
have a fixed feeling that the Northern army was made up of 
barbarians. 

When Williamsburg was evacuated during MeClellan's Peninsula 
Campaign, terror and fear prevailed among those who were left 
to the "cruelties of the invading Yankee host." The women 
gathered in the Lunatic Asylum and spent a night of terrible 
apprehension of the fate awaiting them. In the morning some 
dared to look out of the windows at the Federal army marching 
through and were happily surprised to find that they looked like 
men, that they "had no horns." Later, Federal officers came to 
the asylum and with kindly courtesy urged the women to go to 
their homes, assuring them of protection. Some went at once 
and, finally, as courage and confidence grew, all went to their 
homes and she said, "We have had to do with Northern soldiers 
ever since, and they have been gentlemen." 

February 9. The expedition to Bottom's Bridge proved a 
failure. The enemy evidently knew of its coming and was pre- 
pared. Our regiment had marched 102 miles in 75 hours, 
returning weary, foot-sore and bedraggled — looking very little 
like the smart and well-dressed men of a few days ago. I am 
thankful that it was my luck to escape this severe and inglorious 
march. 

February 10. Our regimental camp was changed to the left 
of Fort Magruder near where Union soldiers were buried in Mav, 
1SG2. 



94 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

I received orders from General Butler to give notice to the 
inhabitants to be prepared to be sent beyond our lines, such as 
would not take the oath of allegiance. It looked as if the belief 
that information had been sent from Williamsburg to the enemy 
of the gathering of the late expedition had led to the decision of 
removing beyond our lines all disloyal persons. 

This order produced consternation among the citizens and 
made busy hours for our office and sad ones, too. For myself 
I did not believe that the order would be followed by one com- 
pelling actual removal; but, all the same, I had to treat the order 
as serious. 

February 13. Our regiment is ordered to march back to New- 
port News and I am relieved as Provost Marshal to join my 
regiment, as I wished to do. Left Williamsburg about 11 a.m. 
and bivouacked for the night at Lee's Mills, where Smith's brigade 
was so badly "cut up" in the Peninsula Campaign. 

February 1 4- Left at 5 A.M. this morning and going via York- 
town and Warwick Court House reached Newport News at 
about 4 p.m. Took transport for Portsmouth, reaching there 
about 9 p.m. Next day we proceeded to Getty's Station, Com- 
panies B, H and K going on to " 15 Mile Station" towards Suffolk. 
We went into a fairly good winter camp left Hy a cavalry regiment, 
fortunately, for the weather suddenly became severely cold — 
ice formed of glass-thickness and we had ice-water for our morning 
ablutions. 

We proceeded to lay out a camp of our own near by and spent 
much labor upon it, for we want a good camp and all the possible 
comforts, even if we remain but a few days. We occupied it 
February 18. We had a few days of stinging cold weather 
with its reminder of what was the quite everyday conditions 
"up North." We were paid oft* by Paymaster Major King. 

February 26. We received 66 more recruits from Elmira 
and they were comforted by all the lies and unwarranted hopes 
usually given to "freshmen." Received orders appointing me 
on a Board of Inquiry into the conduct of an officer of a Rhode 
Island regiment. 

February 28. Sunday. Had service in our new rustic chapel. 
We have always planned in building our regular camps to promptly 
provide hospital quarters and for some sort of chapel.* 

* The story is told of the Colonel of a certain regiment who. after the 
usual Sunday morning inspection and the regiment being in line, requested 
the men who did not wish to attend church services to step forward two 
paces. A considerable number made the advance. Calling the Major he 
ordered him to take command of those who had stepped forward and see 






ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 95 

Our period of enlistment for three years has now quite half 
expired and while we haven't "done much battle" we have had 
very much of all the other experiences of soldier life. We probably 
have much of serious service before us this year. 

March 1. Regiment received orders to march "in light order," 
but with 40 rounds of ammunition. Started at 5 p.m. towards 
North Carolina, reaching Deep Creek at 11 p.m. A very miserable 
march with drizzling rain and freezing cold. At 3 o'clock next 
morning marched into the Dismal Swamp on the canal tow-path. 
It seems that a dash had been made by Confederate cavalry 
which were driven back, followed by our own cavalry and we were 
following in support. We saw dead horses in the canal, indicating 
that there had been a running fight. We finally bivouacked at 
what is called ''Ballyhack," at junction of the Dismal Swamp 
and Lake Drummond Canals. We remained here some days. 
It was a wild, weird region. The queer growth of old cypress 
trees perched up on roots that looked like uncouth legs; the 
branches hanging with moss-like beards; coffee-colored water 
and rank undergrowth — all seemed unnatural and mysterious. 
" Dismal" is an appropriate name. Tom Moore's poem, "The 



Lake of the Dismal Swamp," comes to mind: 

They made her a grave too cold and damp 

For a soul so warm and true; 
But she's gone to the Lake of the Dismal Swamp, 
Where all night long by a firefly lamp 

She paddles her white canoe. 

March 6. Hon. Orlando Kellogg, Hon. William Higby, a 
California Congressman and a native of Essex County, N. Y., 
and Mr. Jesse Gay, a Plattsburgh lawyer, visited our camp and 
came out to us by the field and staff team. They spent the night 
with us. We built a large camp fire and during the evening we 
were interested and entertained by the heated discussion of 
politics between Higby, Republican, and Gay, Democrat. It 
was a hot "confab,!' Mr. Kellogg saying only enough to keep the 
discussion going when it lagged a little. 

March 9. Went back to camp. Our detached Companies B, 
H and K were attacked last night in their separate camp by 
rebel raiders and lost all their camp equipage. The next day 

that they attended religious service, saying, "They need it." Those who did 
not step forward were ordered to "break ranks" and go to their quarters. 

Another story, of doubtful ''veracity," is current. On the report that a 
dozen men of a certain regiment had been baptized by its Chaplain, the 
< olonel of another regiment, in a spirit of rivalry, ordered the forced baptism 
of twice that number of his men "at once." 



9G THREE YEARS WITH THE 









we were ordered to Bower's Hill, on the railroad towards Suffolk, 
so good-bye to another completed camp; but the weather is 
warmer — spring is coming. 

On the 23d had a beautiful fall of snow. It was so damp that 
it clung to and covered the tree branches and twigs like cotton, 
making a fairy scene. It reminded me of what an officer of an- 
other regiment told me. His regiment was on an expedition by 
itself and after a tiresome day's march bivouacked in a field and 
slept the sleep of the weary. During the night some two or three 
inches of moist, clinging snow fell covering the sleeping men like 
a blanket. In the morning the field was white and the covered 
men made white mounds, which, in the dim morning light, gave 
the appearance of a ghostly graveyard. When reveille sounded 
the men emerged from their covering with a sort of resurrection- 
day response to the "last trump." He made an interesting 
verbal picture of the incident and its suggestiveness. 

Our Colonel is made commander of this immediate district 
including Deep Creek. It now appeal's that the attack on the 
camp of our detachment on the 9th inst. was by guerrillas, or 
citizens out for "loot." The blame for not "putting up" a stiff 
fight in defense of the camp belongs to a colonel of colored cavalry 
who was in command. 

We again commence the laying out and building up of a camp; 
but it is so near spring that we have no belief that we shall stay 
very long. Company H has joined us, so we have eight of our 
companies at this camp. ~ 

Captain Bailey and Lieutenant Dobie of Company H have a 
colored boy as a sort of servant. One morning Dobie asked the 
boy to take a note to the nearby camp of another regiment. Bailey 
protested that the boy should first care for their tent, clean up, 
etc.; so the boy hesitated. "Captain, don't we own this nigger 
half and half?" Dobie asked. "That's right," replied the Captain. 
"Well," said Dobie, reaching for his pistol, "I'll shoot my half 
if this note is not delivered, right now." The frightened boy 
grabbed the note and ran to deliver it.* 

* Later on Lieutenant Dobie became Captain and undertook a "speci- 
alized" education of this colored boy and with such satisfaction to 
the Captain that he used to bring the boy out as an exhibit of successful 
intellectual training of negroes. The boy had been taught quite a long and 
humorous "catechism," the concluding parts running something like this: 

"How many days in a week?" Ans. '"Seven." \ I 

"How many weeks in a month?" "Four, 'cept August." 

"How many weeks in August?" "Six weeks in August." 

"Why six weeks in August?" "'Count of harvestin'." 

"How do you know?" "I'm in the habit of makin' a practice of takhV 
notice of what 1 observe." 






» 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 97 

While in this camp we took lessons in sword and saber practice 
from a former officer of the English army, and some are getting 
quite proficient in "parry, guard, cut and thrust"; many 
have received scratches and cuts that might class them with the 
duel-scarred students of Heidelberg. 

April 13. About 400 of us left camp this p.m. and marched 
to the Nansemond River and waited from 8 p.m. until after mid- 
night, when two small gunboats joined us. We crossed the river 
in small boats, all getting over by sunrise of the 14th. We had 
no sleep and no coffee for breakfast or during the day, and we 
missed it. Our coffee is more than a luxury, seems to us more 
like necessary food — often a meal in itself, and we have it in excel- 
lent quality. When we are in camp and our coffee is "brewed" 
in our company kitchens in quantity, the "grounds" find ready 
sale at a good price per pound. Probably used to furnish the best 
part of ground coffee labeled "Pure Java." On the march each 
cooks his own coffee in his little tin cup by dropping in the re- 
quired quantity, filling with water and when brought to a boil 
pouring in a dash of cold water to settle it, and the delightful 
drink is ready. We usually have sugar and condensed milk to 
add to it. 

(Across the river our force was divided and Major Nichol 
with my company and another went on a "raid" through Chucatuc 
count ry to Burnet's Neck to pick up all the horses and bacon 
we could find and drive off or capture any of the lurking enemy 
we might encounter. We saw only now and then a few of what 
appeared to be mounted scouts, who easily evaded us, for we had 
no horses. We returned by another route, arriving back at the 
river about sundown. We had gathered a motley lot of unservice- 
able horses and old carts and about a ton of bacon. We were 
followed by many women pitifully begging us to give them back 

"How many Sundays in a month?" "Four, 'cept August." 

"How many Sundays in August?" "No Sundavs in August." 

"Why no Sundays in August?" " 'Count of hafvestin'." 

"How do you know?" "I'm in the habit of makin' a practice of takin' 

notice of what I observe." 

V"\\ho is the greatest man in the world?" "Abraham Lincoln." 

]' Who is the greatest general?" "General Grant." 

"Who is the bravest man in the Union Army?" "I cannot tell a lie — 

the braves' man is Captain Dobie.'' 

"How do you know?" "I'm in the habit of makin' a practice of takin ? 

notice of what I observe." 

Lne boy when through would salute the Captain and retire, and Dobie 

would emphasize the intuitive ability of the colored people in reaching correct 

ronclusmns by " taking notice of what they observe" — with a little intelligent 

suggestion. 



98 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

their horses and carts, pleading their great need of them. There 
wasn't a horse among the lot which the army could use. They 
were too old or too crippled, the Confederates having already 
taken all the useful horses from that region. 

Major Nichols conferred with Quartermaster DeLaney and 
myself, saying he was ashamed to take these good-for-nothing 
horses, though of some service to these persistent women, and if 
we would share the responsibility, he would let the, women take 
them. We agreed and he told the women to take their own. He 
ordered a couple of sides of bacon thrown into each cart, and the 
happy women, profuse in thanks, made no delay in mounting 
their carts and getting away — 'and we were happy, too. 

We recrossed the river and reached camp late. 

The next day the other detachment that crossed the Nansemond 
with us returned, having inarched as far as Smithfield, exploring 
the creeks and inlets of that vicinity and destroying the water 
craft which was being used by the enenry's scouts. A transport 
met them at Smithfield and brought them back by water to 
Portsmouth and from there they came by rail. 

The newspapers are ''buzzing" with head-line reports of army 
preparations for activity, mentioning all sorts of supposed moves. 
Camp rumors are also abundant and varied — in fact they are 
always plenty. We are quite sure that our armies will not be idle 
this spring and summer and that General Grant will do some 
" business." It is evident that we are not to remain here, or even 
hereabouts, much longer. 

April IS. Orders came to move to-morrow, but we are not 
permitted to know where. Xo matter; we shall find out. 

April 19. Struck tents, gathered our camp equipage and by 
rail to Portsmouth. There took transport John Tucker for New- 
port News and arriving, marched some three miles above the 
Point and bivouacked. 

April 20. It is up the Peninsula again! At night we bivouacked 
at Little Bethel, inside the old earthworks of McClellan's Cam- 
paign. The 10th New Hampshire and 8th Connecticut joined 
us here. 

April 21. Reveille sounded at 4:30 this morning and by six 
o'clock we were swinging towards Yorktown where we arrived 
at about 11 a.m., and camped near location of our former camp. 
Yorktown revives recollections of past experiences there, and 
as we look across the river to Gloucester Point our remembrance 
is somewhat ''malarial." 

April 21 to May 2. Troops have been arriving every day, 




' 



Captain 
JOHN BRYDEN 




JEWELED STAFF BADGE 

2d Brigade, 1st Division, INtii Corfs 
The shape, cjuafcrefoil, indicates the Corps: the color, 
rod, indicates the Division :uul the number, 2, s»>t with 
jewels in this badge, indicates the Brigade, the ribbons, 

red, white and blue. 



f 

* ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 99 

■ 
making up the 10th and 18th Corps to constitute the Army of the 
James. Our regiment is brigaded with the 10th and 13th New 
Hampshire and Sth Connecticut and designated the 2d Brigade, 
1st Division, 18th Army Corps. General Burn ham is command- 
ing Brigade, General Brooks the Division and General "Baldy" 
Smith the Corps — three well-known fighting generals from the 
Army of the Potomac. 

Our Corps badge is a quatrefoil — a four-leaf clover. Divi- 
sions are indicated by color, reel, white and blue, brigade by its 
number in the center of corps badge; regiments by their number 
and State abbreviation on collar of coat or on cap. We wear a 
red quatrefoil badge, with figure "2" in center and " 118 N. Y. V." 
on coat or cap. These badges tell at a glance just where the wearer 
belongs. 

These are busy days. Regimental and brigade drills, reviews 
and inspections; all the officers at work making out reports and 
accounts; attending to supplying needed clothing, accouterments 
and serviceable arms; putting their commands, however small, 
on an efficient campaign footing. We have reduced our baggage, 
five loads of our regimental surplus being sent to Norfolk for 
storage, and 130 sick and sickly men of the 118th went to Hampton 
Hospital — so we are stripped of all impediments to serious 
activity. 

Our brigade has been reviewed by General Burnham, called 
"Old Grizzly," probably because of his full iron-gray beard, 
rugged features and fighting personality. Generals Brooks and 
Smith reviewed the division and General Butler reviewed our 
corps. General Butler is not a strikingly graceful equestrian. 
His short, squat sort of figure looked like a hump on his horse. 
- Generals Smith, Brooks and Burnham are quite martial in their 
"appearand* and bearing. Our Captains have taken turns in drill- 
ing the regiment; for who knows when the " accidents" of war 
may bring one of us in command. 

Have changed our camp here once, so as to be with our brigade 
i ., and division; but while carefully laid out, we are not putting any 
work on it. 

The harbor is filling with transports, so it is evident that we 
will go from here by water: but where or when? There is plenty 

I of speculation as to where we are going. Texas and Mobile are 

talked; but as few of the transports here are sufficient for an out- 
side voyage, the prevailing opinion is that we are to join the Army 
ot the Potomac. But why worry? We sha n't be ignorant of whore 
— forever. 



100 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

About 30,000 men and 80 guns have gathered, about equally 
divided between the 10th and 18th Corps. The 10th Corps is com- 
manded by Major General Gilmore, with Terry, Turner and Ames 
as division commanders; the 18th Corps Major General "Baldy" 
Smith commanding, with Brooks, Weitzel and Hinks in command 
of divisions. Hinks' division is composed of colored troops. 
We know the names of but few generals of brigade. If this is to 
be a separate army its needful cavalry and more artillery must 
be at some other place. Yorktown and Gloucester Point present 
a lively military appearance. Camps in all directions; a large 
acreage white with canvas. Drilling regiments, moving army 
wagons, galloping generals and staffs; orderlies bearing orders, 
bands, bugles, drum corps, blowing whistles and escaping steam 
from the large fleet of river craft — all make up an aggregation 
of scene and sound "redolent'' of gathered martial power, of 
which Old Yorktown has had experience. 

May 2. Have orders to keep on hand four days' cooked rations 
and be prepared to move on notice. Rations are being prepared 
and in a few hours haversacks will be as bulging as an after- 
dinner alderman. Knapsacks are packed and much is being done 
in writing letters home, and as indications are ominous, relatives, 
friends and sweethearts will hear all sorts of disturbing things 
and be given fresh apprehension, worry and fear. 

This home-suffering is not always counted in the effects of war; 
this dull, wearing, all-the-while pain made keen with news of 
expected battles and overwhelming when they come and the 
names of loved ones arc noted among the killed, wounded or 
missing. There is good reason for believing that many may have 
to-day written their last letters. 

Cavalry and artillery which have been stationed at Williamsburg 
arrived to-day; evidence that we are not to go up the Peninsula 
again. 

May 3. Still waiting, still speculating and guessing as to our 
destination. The prevailing rumor to-day is Wilmington, as 
-Mobile was yesterday; but transports are still arriving and many 
are surely not fit for ocean use; so we are likely to go by some 
inland water route. One hundred rounds of pmmunition for 
each soldier have been distributed, and that much added to his load 
with its intimation of things expected. 

May 4. Have marching orders! Shelter tents, which have 
made the plain as white as a cotton field, have- been struck and 
there has been a streak of blue moving to the wharf all day. As 
fast as a transport is loaded it moves from the wharf, anchors 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 101 

in the river, and another comes to the wharf. Our brigade em- 
barked at about 4 p.m. on the transports City of Bath and Vidette 
and was "all aboard" as the sundown gun from the Fort belched 
its war vesper. 

As twilight faded into darkness, lights appeared on the trans- 
ports and these, rocking and changing, seem like so many loose 
stars playing over the river to cheer our departure. Playing 
bands, men cheering and singing; busy tugs coughing through the 
fleet bearing orders; neighing horses and noise of escaping steam; 
soldiers shouting from steamer to steamer — but not a responsible 
word as to our destination. The scene is inspiring and the 
mingled sounds exciting. 

Two or three steamers weighed anchor and started up the river. 
Then it appeared that we would go up the York and there are 

I cheers from the floating thousands and especially from the troops 
on the moving vessels who think the}- have the honor of the 
advance. 

But why are the other vessels still at anchor? 

Note. We knew afterwards that the vessels going up the river were in- 
tended to deceive the watching spies and scouts of the enemy as to the des- 
tination of the expedition, for undoubtedly we were being watched. 

Finally a rocket goes up — two — three! The steam whistles 
answer, and soon came the creaking and " Heave O" of men and 
windlasses weighing anchors, and one after another the vessels 
start down the river! There are cheers again and shouts of "How 
are you Mobile,' 7 " Texas'' and " Wilmington"; but with so 
many small river steamers, double-end ferryboats, small tugs, 
etc., it was plain enough that no ocean or coast voyage was in- 
tended. We must be going up the James or Potomac. 

A tug steams alongside with, "Vidette, ahoy! Follow the 
Spaulding which is your brigade headquarters." We follow the 
Spaulding on and on, till tired out we fall asleep on the open deck. 

May 5. We awoke this morning to find our fleet in Hampton 
Roads; all sorts of vessels from harbor tugs and ferryboats to 
the considerable steamship Baltic. There are canal boats and 
pontoons in tow. From Old Point to Newport News the Roads 
are full of banner-bearing, artillery-carrying, soldier-laden vessels 
■ — so it is up the James! 

We are being convoyed by Rear Admiral S. P. Lee's fleet of 
five armored vessels and General Graham's flotilla of small gun- 
boats, which, passing up the James well ahead of us, we followed, 
passing Newport News at about 8 a.m. 

Passing Jamestown, the site of Virginia's earliest settlement 



THREE YEARS WITH THE 



i ' 



and the first by English in this country (1G08), we saw only a 
small ruin to mark the spot. From here we had a long view of 
the river, up and down, and as far as we could see were the hurrying 
vessels of our fleet. 

About noon General Butler's flag steamer, the fast Greyhound, 
bearing our blue and crimson army flag, passed us. The General 
shouted, "Forward with all possible speed"; but our steamer is 
doing its best already. 

We know that Fort Powhatan is above us and considered 
strong and strongly situated on a bluff at a bend of the river; 
so when we stopped within a few miles of it, we guessed what it 
was for. But our armored ships and gunboats are ahead and 
w r e heard no firing. After halting for about an half -hour we 
move on, and as the fort came into view we saw the Stars and 
Stripes floating over it and colored troops disembarking. Cheers 
go up from the passing fleet. 

The next fortified spot on the river is Fort Pocahontas, or 
Wilson's Landing; but our flag was floating there and we again 
cheered in passing. 

We now observed the enemy's signal flags in motion at ele- 
vated points, no doubt communicating with City Point where 
there is telegraphic connection with Richmond, and we are sure 
that alarming news will soon disturb the capital of the Confederacy. 
We pass Harrison's Landing, the scene of the last days of 
jMcClellan's Peninsula Campaign. 

As the sun was sinking behind the trees we reached City Point 
where we found the flag of truce steamer City of New York, which 
came up the river the day before loaded with Confederate prisoners 
for exchange. These prisoners charged us with following in the 
wake of a white flag, else torpedoes and obstructions would have 
delayed us until the river forts could have been garrisoned. 

Some of our troops had already debarked, and our Signal Corps 
is in possession of the City Point station, just evacuated by the 
enemy. 

Thus have we in one day sailed into the very heart of the 
Confederacy, with but few shots and, so far as we know, without 
the loss of a man! 

We moved to the other side of the mouth of the Appomattox 
and anchored off Bermuda Hundred. Our Construction Corps 
got at work immediately, building wharves by using the old canal- 
boat hulks which we had in tow, and debarkation commenced. 

Gunboats go tip the James and Appomattox. Xets are stretched 
to hinder floating torpedoes coining among us. Pickets and 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 103 

videttes are sent out and posted. There is music by bauds and 
sinking by men. Lights appear on the vessels, giving that starry 
appearance of the night before, and the torches of our Signal 
Corps dance and wave, " uttering' 7 their weird, silent language. 
Steam kept up to full head shouts its victory as it escapes from 
. its boiler-prisons, ironclads sound " eight bells'' and we sleep 
on board our transport — ending a day's easy service for the 
restoration of the Union. 

May 6. The early dawn revealed a clear sky and rosy east 
with every sign of a scorching day. A mist hung over the river, 
quite hiding City Point from view. The red smokestacks of our 
ironclads were dimly seen up the James like giant sentinels. 
The birds were singing among the trees — the rich, clear, varying 
notes of the mocking bird leading the feathered choir. 

The debarkation of troops commenced last night has continued 
and bivouac fires are seen in a large field. At sunrise our transports 
moved to the improvised landing, and in an hour afterwards the 
118th moved up the low bank, stacked arms and " breakfasted." 

Down went the fences for fires; details of men loaded with 
canteens were searching for better water than that of the river, 
and soon we were eating hardtack and salt pork and drinking 
coffee from the tin cup in which it was boiled. Hilarity prevailed, 
for we were not tired; our voyage up the river was restful. Our 
breakfast was a picnic. 

A juvenile rabbit started from a nearby thicket and running 
in front of us was charged upon by many hands. Coffee was 
spilled, hardtack and pork trodden under foot and many of the 
charging force fared worse. His hareship was caught and panting 
in his captor's hands was an object of much interest as the first 
prisoner of the expedition. His gray coat was urged against him, 
but he was destined to a kind of kindness. The soldier made 
room in his haversack for a prison and later on when we were at 
a halt, I saw the soldier trying to feed his captive clover and 
sugar; but from obstinacy or fright he wouldn't even nibble the 
offerings of his " mud-sill" captor. He was finally given his 
liberty. A little insignificant, unusual incident like this often 
proved of absorbing interest to soldiers. 

As the mist cleared, the broad fields of the Carter plantation 
across the river looked a sea of green as the well-advanced spring 
verdure waved in the slight breeze. A lady of Jeff Davis' family 
(said to be a daughter) visiting at this plantation, asked to be 
sent up the river, and we saw her go on board a tug which will 
take her, under flag of truce, to an up-river Confederate steamer. 






104 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

We received report this morning that Grant and the Army of 
the Potomac were moving "on to Richmond." Our mental 
almanac says, "Look out for thunder about these days." The 
flags of our Signal Corps " wig-wagged" nervously all morning 
from gunboats, City Point, Butler's steamer and Corps head- 
quarters. Graham's flotilla began moving up the Appomattox, 
bugles sounded the advance and a stream of blue poured into the 
woods on the Petersburg road. The day proved hot and full 
knapsacks, haversacks, load of ammunition with rifle became 
burdensome and there was much scattering of clothing. At even- 
halt there was an examination of "personal baggage" to find 
what more could be spared. One found it in his extra shirt, or 
socks perhaps knit by Mother, or "her/' and holding them up 
inquired, "Who wants these?" and if not wanted they were cut up 
and thrown away. Some with speculative intent improved the 
chance of substituting a new and clean article for one worn or 
in need of laundering; others "took on" things too good to throw 
away, but later on "shedding" them himself. 

A young blond reporter for a New York paper was observed 
taking a bright-hued negligee shirt from his pack and as he un- 
folded it, apparently to throw it away, several soldiers expressed 
a willingness to take it. "Give away my only spare shirt? Guess 
not at just this stage of the war," was his reply, and folding it 
more compactly replaced it in his pack, the mixed dust and 
perspiration on his face scarcely hiding his expression of disgust 
with those who could think him so profligate and reckless. 

We were kept informed of the progress of the gunboats by the 
slow strokes of their paddles or an occasional whistle, and now 
and then we could see them through the trees, "feeling" their 
way up the Appomattox. We could also see our troops moving 
along the south bank. Point of Rocks was reached at about 
noon. Cheers are heard at the head of the column; they have 
seen from this elevation the spires of Petersburg. We halt, 
the gunboats moving on towards Fort Clifton. 

A lovelier place than Point of Rocks plantation we have seldom 
seen. The mansion on a bluff point commands a fair view up 
and down the river. The fields are covered with growing grain 
and clover, and all about are blossoming trees and shrubs. A 
large number of magnolia trees and laurel skirt the river. The 
mansion, fields, fences and outbuildings have a Northern air of 
neatness and repair. 

Signal flags soon waved from the house-top, communicating 
with the gunboats and with the troops on the opposite side. 



\ 









ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 105 



Has Fort Clifton been abandoned? Bang! goes the first shell 
at the Fort. Soon comes the hissing reply. 

Bugles sounded '•attention," and our Brigade filed right, into the 
woods towards the James and took position a little to the right of 
midway between the rivers. By four o'clock a line was formed 
reaching from the James to the Appomattox, the 10th Corps 
forming the left and the 18th Corps the right. This line is across 
a narrow part of the peninsula formed by incurving of the two 
rivers, about three miles across from Trent's Reach on the James 
to near Port Walthall on the Appomattox. 

The cannonading has increased since noon, and by 5 p.m. was 
quite lively. One of our gunboats has been blown up while 
dragging for torpedoes. We hear firing from the gunboats on 
the James, also. We commenced cutting the small timber along 
our front and throwing up a slight breastwork. 

Heckman's Xew Jersey brigade was sent out towards the Peters- 
burg and Richmond railroad some distance in our front. Quite 
lively rifle firing was heard; but they returned about dark, having 
encountered some force of the enemy at Port Walthall Junction, 
accomplishing but little. 

We were ordered to " sleep on our arms," and thus with '-'harness 
on our backs" we shall rest till morning, if we can. 

May 7. In line early this morning under light marching orders. 
Knapsacks left and guarded by the sick. Two days'' rations to be 
carried with one hundred rounds of ammunition. My! what a 
load of shooting stuff! 

Heckman failed last nisht to gain even the railroad. The 
enemy, entrenched behind the track, first ''discovered himself" 
by firing a volley into one of Heckman's regiments. His loss 
was about 60. We are to try it again to-day. Reinforcements 
have been received by the enemy. Our Division filed out of the 
woods into a field near the Petersburg road. General Brooks, 
with his hat a little to one side, seems to be in the best of spirits. 
He asks General Burnham to take the advance. " Old Grizzly" — 
that's our pet name for Burnham — is ready, and casts a wink of 
satisfaction toward his odd, decidedly ''dry" Adjutant General. 
Captain Clark. It is the position of honor, but not of "safetv 
first." 

We advanced and were soon fired upon by a vidette or picket 
post of the enemy, and a squadron of the First Mounted Rifles 
was ordered to charge. As they passed our regiment (we know 
them well) they assumed a cavalry air, as much as to say, "We'll 
lead you." We followed them. They dashed forward. A few 



10G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

shots were fired and soon a guard returned with two "Johnny 
Rebs." "Hello, Johnny, any more of you about here?" we 
inquired. "You 'tins will find a slaughter pen down by the rail- 
road. We give you 'uns hell last night," was their warning answer. 
The sound of musketry was again heard, so near that the balls 
zipped over our heads. Soon the "M. R.V came back on a trot. 
General Brooks galloped to the front and in no genial manner 
inquired what this meant. "We were -fired into from an ambush," 
said the "M. R.'s." "Why didn't you charge the ambush?" 
Something was said that that was no place for cavalry. Brooks 
said, "Men on rabbits could do better"; and the letters "M. R." 
on the caps of the gallant 1st were facetiously made to stand for 
"Mounted Rabbits." But the Rifles gave no cause for censure — 
did as well as cavalry could. Several of their horses were killed 
or wounded. General Brooks ordered Burnham to put in his 
brigade. The 8th Connecticut was given the skirmish line, and 
they did gallant work throughout the day. They soon dislodged 
the enemy and drove him to the crest of a hill where a breast- 
work of fence rails and earth had been made. Here the 8th were 
held in check. The Brigade, following close after in line of battle, 
was ordered to fix bayonets. As the steel rattled the "Johnnies" 
"got up and got." They fell back to the bank of a ravine near 
the railroad — a strong position. Our skirmishers advanced close 
to them in the woods and suffered somewhat from "enemy 
snipers." A fire broke out in the woods and it became a matter 
of urgency that the wounded be gotten off at once. This was 
done under fire by the stretcher corps of the brigade commanded 
by Assistant Surgeon Porteous of our regiment. 

While we were commanding the attention of the enemy in front 
the 110th New York made a flank dash for the railroad, reached 
it, tearing up some of the track and doing other damage. 

At about 5 p.m. had orders to fall back and take up the position 
we left in the morning. The loss in our Brigade was principally 
in the 8th Connecticut, some 70 men killed or wounded, several 
officers among the number. 

The mansion at Point of Rocks has been taken for our Base 
Hospital. We wonder that a stronger effort was not made to 
gain Petersburg. Prisoners report Beauregard's army coming 
to its relief. The enemy we have met with to-day has been 
mostly militia. We are tired to-night, having marched in line 
of battle, under fire, through thicket, bramble and brush, while 
the sun has poured a merciless heat upon us. 

May 8. Sabbath — and in view of the last few days' noise, 









I 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 107 

. 
it seems quite Sabbath-like. An occasional boom from either 
river sounds like the growling of beasts that have tasted blood. 
Had a brief church service. 

We have no letters and no news. Various rumors are circulating 
in regard to General Grant's movements. Have received orders 
to be ready with one day's rations, to march at daylight to-morrow 
morning. 

May 9. Left bivouac at daylight this morning and moved in 
the same direction as on Saturday. We went as far, nearly, as 
we did then, without opposition. The effluvia of dead horses in 
the brush compare badly with the odor of the laurel and other 
fkrwering shrubs and trees. The enemy's pickets were met at 
10 a.m. and easily forced back, so that we soon occupied all the 
ground we did on Saturday. Here we saw sights that were shame- 
ful and maddening. We found several bodies of our dead, left 
on the field on the 7th, stripped entirely naked, and mutilated 
in a manner to show beyond doubt the hellish motives of the 
perpetrators. More than one vow of vengeance was uttered with 
compressed lip and tightened grip of the musket, which, if life 
was spared, may have been carried out. Other bodies were 
found burned by the fire in the woods. These were all buried 
by us, as the enemy had buried his own dead only. The 118th, 
or a portion of it, had the skirmish line to-day, and showed good 
drill. The greatest danger to-day has been from the enemy's 
artillery, and "rotten" shells, as the boys call them, have proved 
in man}- a case that "a miss is as good as a mile." One solid shot, 
striking immediately in front of a skirmisher who was lying on 
the ground, passed into the earth beneath him, coming out just 
in rear of Iris feet, doing no damage except to throw him over. 
South Carolina and Georgia troops have been before us to-day, 
and enemy reinforcements are arriving. 

May 10. Line of battle was formed by our brigade last night 
at about sundown in sight of the enemy. After dark the 10th 
New Hampshire quietly advanced some rods and nearly to a rail 
fence. There was shelling more or less during the night. Before 
midnight we were startled by firing from the 10th New Hampshire. 
It seems the enemy, supposing they knew exactly where we lay, 
crept up for the purpose of surprising us. They came upon the 
advanced 10th New Hampshire unexpectedly and were them- 
selves surprised. The 10th poured several volleys into them 
with effect. Dead were found astride the fence in the morning, 
killed in the act of getting over. This concluded their further 
endeavors to drive us back last night. The 25th and 27th North 



108 THREE YEARS WITH THE 









Carolina regiments attacked the same numbered Massachusetts 
regiments and were severely repulsed. Quite a coincidence, 
regiments bearing the same number, yet from wide-apait States 
and extremely opposite in their views of the questions which 
we are now "discussing." 

Quite a funny incident occurred last night. A first sergeant 
of our regiment while on the skirmish line after dark and during 
active skirmish firing, called for a stretcher, saying he was wounded. 
He was reached and placed on the stretcher, when he expressed 
a fear that he was bleeding badly. A handkerchief was tied about 
his leg just above where he located his wound, and twisted with 
a bayonet in the manner of a tourniquet. In this way he was 
carried to the flying hospital. The pain from his corded leg had 
become almost unbearable, and at his urgent solicitation to have 
his wound attended to, he was accommodated. No blood was 
found! and no wound! He was dismissed by the Surgeon with 
remarks far from complimentary. Mortified beyond expression, 
he returned to the front. The fact was he had fallen into a hole 
filled with water and at the same time hurt his knee. Naturally 
enough in the darkness he supposed it was the effect of a bullet 
and that the water trickling down was blood. I say naturally, 
for the Sergeant was incapable of ''faking." 

To-day has been a weary one. Have been under fire all day, 
"feeling" the enemy, as it is called. We advanced quite as far 
as Port Walthal, but there is no prospect of immediately entering 
Petersburg, for its defense is hourly growing stronger. We 
passed the R. & P. railroad and destroyed it somewhat. We did 
not cross Walthal Creek. As a detachment of our troops was 
moving towards the bridge which crosses this creek, this a.m., 
joking ''Johnnies" on the hill beyond ran towards the bridge 
with the fore wheels of a wagon mounting a short log which looked 
quite like a howitzer or small field-piece. As soon as seen the said 
detachment broke for cover, to the amusement of friends and 
foes. It recalled the Quaker guns of Manassas. 

In the afternoon we began to withdraw towards our old posi- 
tion, which we begin to dignify with the name of camp. A lively 
shelling was kept up until we got out of range. Camp was reached 
at dusk, and although under almost a continual fire for forty-eight 
hours, every man of our regiment who went out is with us! The 
"boys/' fatigued as they are, are feeling well, and to-night sit 
about the camp fires recounting their adventures and escapes. 
We all feel that delay has lost us Petersburg unless at great 
sacrifice of life. The bright anticipations and opportunities of a 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 109 

few days since are clouded. We are all discussing the situation 
and criticizing the delays and hesitancy, which we think inex- 
cusable; and yet we know nothing beyond the very limited part 
we have had In this movement of the Army of the James. Being 
ignorant of the main object and purpose of this expedition, it 
may be accomplishing its intention; but it looks to us as if the 
chance for immediate easy glory to the Army of the James has 
passed. It is easy to criticize and find fault. 

May 11. Have remained in camp all day. Mercury registers 
99 above zero. 

(Our first mail for some time arrived this afternoon and made 
every one happy, even those who received no letters. Letters 
from home are a delight, and the arrival of mail, especially after 
some delay, brightens up the camp. It is said that the things in 
particular that delight soldiers are mess calls, the arrival of the 
paymaster and of letters from home — these three and the greatest 
of these are letters. 

Large numbers of the "boys" are engaged in answering letters. 
All the shady spots are thus occupied, and those in flowery, mossy 
nooks are suspected of writing sweeter things than mothers and 
sisters hear of. The burden of the songs this evening are of the 
"Dearest-love-clo-you~remember?" sort. Guessing from what I 

I couldn't help overhearing to-night, " Dearest love" does not always 

remember. 
Said one of a couple of tent-mates occupying "rooms" next 
mine, who had been neighbors at home: "Did you hear from 

Miss to-day?" "No," was the reply, "but I heard about 

her." ''So did I," said No. 1; "my sister writes that she's soft 

on ." No. 2, "So Mother writes. If there is a draft he'll 

'skedaddle.' That cuss would faint from a nosebleed. I'm going' 
to be sorry for her, Jim, for she's a fine girl; but I'm not goin" 
to lose any sleep." 

I guess he did not sleep with normal soundness, notwithstanding 
his declaration. 

Inasmuch as our regiment is so largely made up of quite young 
men, boys, indeed, it may be supposed that there are hundreds of 
heart entanglements with their anxieties, happiness and, like the 
incident related, disappointments. Absence docs not always make 
for fondness. 

May L?, News from the Army of the Potomac tells of desperate 
fighting, large losses, but no decisive results. 

Last night we had Orders to be ready by daylight, with two 
days' rations and the indispensable but burdensome one hundred 



110 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

rounds of ammunition. Left camp at daylight. We kept to the 
right of our route of the 7th and 9th inst., bearing for the Peters- 
burg and Richmond pike. Before reaching this road we learned 
that Beauregard's army was moving on it towards Drury's Bluff. 
Our advance was necessarily cautious, our main column only 
moving after the ground immediately before it had been" searched " 
by a strong skirmish line. The route, being through woods with '1 

profuse undergrowth, and the day hot and rainy, discounted 
celerity of movement. We struck the turnpike at "11 Mile" 
post but a short time after Beauregard's rear guard had passed: 
indeed it then occupied a hill in advance of us, and as we de- 
bouched from the woods, greeted us with shell, killing and wound- 
ing several men and horses and doing much damage to the trees 
in our vicinity. A section of Belger's brass Napoleons was soon 
in position and silenced the offending artillery. Here the Surgeons 
planted their hospital flag (red) and began the work of amputa- 
tion — for this seems to be the general treatment of wounds, 
curing them by cutting them off. The dead were buried by the 
roadside and we moved on. From this point the skirmish line 
began to be stubbornly disputed, and, often, support was needed 
by the skirmishers to overcome the opposition. 

A strong stand was made by the enemy's skirmishers in a 
swamp near .which a stone milepost bore record, ''10 miles to 
Manchester." Here our troops were deployed and made to 
occupy an elevation overlooking the swamp. Although the woods 
prevented our view, it was evident that there was elevated ground 
beyond, on which it seemed probable the enemy in some force 
was posted. The skirmish line was strengthened, and yet we 
knew from the sound of the firing that it was not advancing. 
Something must be done. "General Burnham's brigade is ordered 
to charge the swamp," said an aide of General Brooks. We moved 
down the slope in line of battle and were soon struggling through 
the creepers and tangled, prickly vines common to Southern 
swamps. Fallen trees, mire and bogs combined to break our 
ranks, making frequent "dressings" necessary. We passed our 
skirmish line, each man "strategetically " posted behind some log 
or tree. The ''Johnnies" saw something earnest in our move- 
ment and retired to their reserves. Several volleys were fired at 
us. from the hill beyond, but the bullets passed over our heads. 

The 10th New Hampshire, on our extreme left, became detached 
from the brigade line and in advance of it. Supposing they had 
swung to the left, they changed direction obliquely to the right 
and soon took the enemy in flank. They made the best of their 



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ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 111 

position, gave a cheer, and swept across our front, routing the 
enemy beautifully! The "Rebs" didn't understand this ma- 
neuver, neither did the 10th, for they were surprised to find 
themselves on the right and occupying a line perpendicular, to 
that of the brigade. They were pleased to know, however, that 
their blunder was the "big thing" of this "swamp campaign." 

General Burnham, who rode along the road till passing the 
worst part of the swamp, rode into it, but in advance of our 
skirmishers. He was at once made a target by the enemy, and 
while making uneasy glances for the brigade, one of our skirmishers 
hallooed to him that he was beyond our lines. "I believe ye!" 
was the response, as he came back to the brigade. Other troops 
now came up and formed on our right and left. We advanced 
to within sight of the enemy's outer works, but will probably 
not attack them to-night. The pioneers are searching for and 
burying the dead. Our regimental loss has been light. Sergeant 
Kent, Company B, was killed on the skirmish line to-night and 
buried just in rear. 

The day has been disagreeable in the extreme, rainy and chilly, 
and what rest we get to-night will be in soaking clothes, and 
without the friendly warmth of a fire — for a fire would reveal 
our whereabouts. A large force of our cavalry has passed our 
left, supposedly for the Danville railroad. We miss our coffee 
to-night, although some made a little fire, shading it with brush, 
and boiled a few cups of this glorious drink. We like our coffee 
always, and our pork and "hardtack" when we have nothing 
better. In this we seem to differ from the knights-errant of song 
and story, of whom Hudibras writes : 

Unless they grazed, there's not one word 
Of their provision on record; 
Which made some confidently write, 
They had no stomachs but to fight. 

May 13. Rest last night was out of question. Beds were too 
damp and there was too much noise "round the house," picket 
firing and shelling being kept up by both sides. The day is more 
pleasant than yesterday. We have advanced very little. We 
do not know what makes any delay necessary, unless our mission 
simply be to "amuse" the enemy, while our cavalry inflicts 
some damage upon his communications. It is evident that the 
enemy has succeeded in collecting his loose forces from North 
and South Carolina and elsewhere, and has put them with Beau- 
regard. We ought to have prevented this. The news from Grant 
tells of hard fighting and of advances. 



112 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

May 14- We have charged and captured the enemy's strong 
outer line of works, without severe loss. They consist of rifle- 
pits, redoubts and batteries. It seems to us that they might have 
been successfully defended. It is not certain that the 10th Corps 
has carried the enemy's right. No move has- been made since 
the carrying of the works. Although we have the works, they 
will be of little defense for us against the enemy, unless made 
over to face him. Our regiment of its own accord has cut a stand- 
ing place, or banquette, along the ditch, wide enough for one 
rank only, reached by logs of wood and fence rails laid as foot- 
bridges in places. In our front is a much stronger line of works, 
occupied by the enemy and mounting guns. Shelling has been 
kept up all day: one shell tore the head of Sergeant George B. 
Place, Company K, from his body, and caused a shudder on those 
who witnessed his death. 

May 15. Sunday — with "nary" a church-going bell. Though 
we have enjoyed comparative silence, it has lacked the serenity 
we have felt on Sundays at home. Rained last night and nearly 
all day, so we are very " moist." Our regiment has been trying 
to better the works along our front for our defense; arranging 
more foot-ways over the ditch and building such traverses as 
we could without picks or spades. A soldier does these things 
instinctively, after having experienced the benefit of works and 
their protecting virtue. We wonder that tools have not been 
given and orders issued to turn the works completely for our pro- 
tection. The wonder is the greater, as orders have been issued to 
the Quartermasters to bring not only.camp equipage to the front, 
but to establish issuing depots on this line. Surely we should pre- 
pare to defend. Rumor says that General Smith ("Baldy") in- 
sists on fortifying, and that General Butler declares it unnecessary, 
because the enemy is acting on the defensive, and is expecting us 
to attack. General Brooks directed us to string telegraph wire in 
front of our line to-night, so as to tangle advancing troops. "We 
have done so, but Heckman's brigade on our right has not. 

Heckman's brigade forms the extreme right of our line, and his 
right rests within about a mile of the James, the intermediate 
space being eked out with a few posts of colored cavalry. Soldiers 
who have been to the James to-day express surprise that our right 
should be so exposed, and the matter is much discussed. Some 
anxiety pervades the regiment to-night, for it is understood that 
our brigade will be in a charging column against the enemy works 
in our front — in the morning. The enemy has put in additional 
guns and reinforcements and strengthened his works. We can 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 113 

see that they are busy over there. These matters are talked 
over by the soldiers with an intelligence and judgment which 
would do credit to a council of war. It is, however, enough for 
them to know that they charge in the morning. 

Theirs not to make reply, 
Theirs not to reason why, 
. . . though they knew 
Some one had blundered. 

There is a jolly ci-ew of officers at the large brick mansion, 
in rear of our line to-night; but they are all high in rank and we 
must not intrude. It is the headquarters of Generals Butler, 
Smith, Brooks, Rurnham and others, who with their staffs make 
quite a party. An accidental discharge of a gun to-day killed 
Myron A. Arnold, of Company C, and wounded his brother. 
Some of our baggage has been brought up to-day and commissary 
stores are arriving. It is evidently not the intention of the com- 
manding General to fall back — certainly not! 

May 16. This date should be written in indelible ink instead 
of pencil to give some semblance of its probable deep and lasting 
record in our memory. The most depressing page so far in our 
regimental history may be written now. 

We stood to arms this morning at 3 o'clock. A heavy fog 
rilled the atmosphere and shut out all view beyond a few paces. 
The breaking day did not seem to much enlarge our visual area. 
Before sunrise we noticed troops approaching, but they seemed 
to be our own. The commander of a section of Belger's Battery, 
on the right of our Brigade, was told to send canister through a 
ravine in front. A few shots made the approaching troops lie 
down, but a staff officer came up and directed the firing to cease, 
saying they were our pickets. This report communicated itself 
along the line, until many officers ordered their men to cease 
firing. We received no orders of any kind outside our regimental 
officers. Captain Ransom, Company I, impatient at the hesita- 
tion, sprang upon the works and fired his revolver at the approach- 
ing men, but the last of his five shots had hardly been fired when 
he fell, shot through the arm and lungs. Other officers became 
equally confident of the character of the approaching troops, and 
the hesitation which the fog and the report that they were our 
pickets coming in, had caused, was now over, and a rain of lead 
was poured into them. The first rank stumbled over the tele- 
graph wire in our front, and those following after, over them, 
breaking their ranks and creating confusion. Some threw down 
their guns, came in and were sent to the rear, prisoners. 



114 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Many of our men had been killed and wounded, but the living 
were cheerful and we felt that we must hold our line. But the 
line was giving way on our right. Heckman's Brigade seemed 
to have fallen back, and we were beginning to receive an enfilading 
and rear fire. The 8th Connecticut on our immediate right was 
being doubled back, company by company. Still no orders from 
Brigade or Division headquarters. We used our incomplete and 
improvised traverses and found them 'of some service, and at one 
time the enemy in our front seemed to be checked. But the enemy 
was surrounding us, and now so near as to be reached with our 
bayonets, with hand-to-hand encounters. This was destruction, 
and company commanders directed each man to act for himself 
in getting to the rear. Some started immediately; others con- 
tinued to fire. The wounded begged not to be left on the field, 
and many a man met his death in trying to save a comrade from 
a worse fate — a rebel prison. One gallant officer, Lieutenant 
Adams, seized the colors and shouted, " Rally 'round the flag of 
the 118th!" But no use to rally. There are too many of the 
enemy on front and flank — too many brave fellows lying in 
yonder ditch — to make further defense reasonable. With a 
desultory firing, all who could fell back out of rifle range, although 
still reached by the enemy's artillery, and our pitiful remnant 
of a regiment was re-formed. 

The enemy, discouraged by the severity of their loss, or content 
with their success, did not follow us, but gave continuous evidence 
of their animosity by shelling our new position. 

We kept up a show of front till most of our wounded were got 
to the rear, then gradually fell back, and at night to our camp, 
there to learn the terrible truth that the 118th casualties totaled 
173, including 11 officers — killed, wounded and missing! We 
also found that we had captured nearly as many prisoners as we 
had men left in the regiment! It is a reasonable conclusion that 
the 118th punished the enemy to a greater degree than it itself 
suffered. No regiment in the battle had a better or longer chance 
at them. Heckman's Brigade — the right of the line — was 
surprised, flanked before they were aware. At one time that 
entire Brigade were prisoners, but in the fog and confusion some 
escaped. Their commander was not so fortunate. Our Brigade 
after the hesitation consequent upon the doubt whether friends 
or foes were approaching and afterwards whether they desired to 
surrender or not, kept up a steady and effective fire. 

Among the prisoners taken to-day was a staff captain, who, 
riding up to a lieutenant of our regiment confusedly inquired 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 115 

where Walker's (rebel) Brigade was. A pistol was pointed at 
his head with the assurance that he must dismount. Seeing his 
predicament, he coolly replied, " I will not trouble you to shoot/' 
and dismounted. 

Long lines of ambulances have been conveying the wounded 
to the rear all day; many men died in the woods, many more 
died on the way to the base hospital, and others died there. 
Our officers killed are the gallant Lieutenant Stevenson, Company 
F, killed while trying to take his twice wounded Captain Livingston 
off the field, and Captain John S. Stone, Company K. Captain 
Stone was a Presbyterian clergyman when he enlisted. Known 
to be wounded: Lieutenant Wing, Company E and Adjutant 
Carter, both in the enemy's hands; Lieutenant Colonel Nichols. 
Captains Livingston and Ransom and Lieutenant Treadway in 
our hands. The fate of Captains Dennis Stone and Pierce and 
Lieutenants Pitt and Sherman is unknown.* 

While the severest fighting was early in the morning, it con- 
tinued more or less during most of the day. We were compelled 
to retire some distance from our position in the captured outer 
line of the enemy's fortifications, where the "remains" of our 
brigade re-formed and made a stand, and while the enemy was 
badly confused by losses and breaking up of organizations, they 
kept us aware of their uncomfortable " near-by-ness " all day. 
It was plain, too, that they were re-forming and preparing for 
further aggressiveness. We had had no opportunity during the 
day for anything like a meal, just "nibbling" from our haversacks. 
Weary with the strenuosities, excitement and work of the day, 
we were indeed a benumbed remnant of what we were in the 
morning. Many were suffering from wounds too slight to justify 
going to the rear or hospital. A soaking rain came on in the 
afternoon and continued for most of the night, adding to our 
unhappiness. 

Ours is a solemn, sad and silent camp. Tears are seen trickling 
down the faces of those who have to-day proved that they were 
brave men. They miss comrades of many a march, camp, bivouac 
and picket post — perhaps a father, son or brother. There is 
no relation of adventure or of hairbreadth escapes; no brag or 

* Lieutenant Wing was mortally wounded, taken prisoner and died at 
Richmond May 17 or IS; buried in Oakwood Cemetery, his body afterwards 
removed to (Jims Falls. 

Adjutant Carter lost his right arm, was taken prisoner, afterwards paroled 
and mustered out of service. Lieutenant Sherman wounded in foot, captured 
and paroled. 

Captains Dennis Stone and Pierce and Lieutenant Pitt were taken prisoners 
and later paroled. 



116 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

self-glorification. The men who were left as camp guard and 
others able to do so, are hard at work with spade, pick and 
shovel, while the occasional rattle of the picket fire tells us that 
the enemy is after us. But despite this and the hellish scenes 
of the day, tired nature must 3'ield to sleep, and who knows but 
dreams of friends and peaceful scenes may make us doubt which 
is the dream and which the reality. 

To-night an officer of our Brigade said: "I do not count myself 
a coward, but I have felt that I am by no means a brave man 
and have really doubted my ability to face danger. It, therefore, 
means much to me that I did my duty to-day, and I am now 
thinking that duty is a compelling, independent instinct, for 
to-day I had no thought of danger to myself, only of what I 
was there for." 

My interpretation of his "instinct" theory is that he had 
discovered that he was dutj'-proof in spite of his modest other- 
wise belief, and that is genuine bravery. True courage is mostly 
that fine quality of mind which makes us forget how afraid 
we are. 

One of our officers, whom I count as a brave man, said to me, 
"It is about all I can do to keep others from finding out what a 
d — — d coward I am." 

This is an exaggeration of the truth that thoughtful soldiers 
require nerve to meet recognized danger, a quality of courage 
which reckless dare-devils know nothing of. 

To-night when I thought all were asleep except myself I heard 
a young man say to another lying with him: "Jim, if I ever get 
home again I don't believe I'm ever going to love am r country .] 
any more." 

May 17. Visited the 18th Corps Base Hospital at Point of 
Rocks. The change which war makes along its march could be 
plainly seen here. This beautiful spot, which seemed such a 
paradise a few days ago, now looks a barren, dusty waste. Wagon 
and ambulance trains are parked upon it, with hospital and other 
tents in all directions. All the verdant beauty of this place when 
we first saw it has disappeared — dust covers everything. The 
horrors of war are now centered here with its mutilated, dead 
and dying fruitage. 

The ever present Christian Commission with many a delicacy 
for indifferent appetites and many a comfort for the suffering 
is doing service. 

A detail was digging grave trenches in a garden. A long row 
is already tenanted and now and then a stretcher arrives with its 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 117 

lifeless burden to add to the uncoffined men who have toiled and 
suffered, dared and died for their country. 

Down by a hedge was quite a pile of amputated arms and legs, 
torn hands and shattered feet, waiting burial. 

There are occasional groans, some cries as pain becomes un- 
bearable in silence and some delirious raving; but on the whole 
there is a solemn quietness. 

A soldier with a badly shattered thumb and finger was told 
by a surgeon that both would have to be amputated and was 
directed to lie on the ground to be chloroformed. 

He said, "I ain't goin' to take no chloroform. Go ahead, I 
can stand it." 

He was told that the little operation would be very painful, 
but he still refused chloroform. The members were amputated, 
and while he showed evidence of much pain, he stoically endured it. 

"Well," said the surgeon, "you have such splendid nerve you 
ought to be a surgeon." 

"Oh, I've practiced it some," he replied. 

"I thought as much," said the surgeon. 

"Yes," drawled the man, "I was in the butcher business several 
years!" 

This was such a ''good one" on the surgeon that he couldn't 
help laughing with others who heard it, in spite of the solemn 
surroundings. 

A fair-faced boy kept asking in his delirium why his mother 
did not come, and there was that in his wild look that indicated 
his wonder wh} r one who had always responded to his need should 
be absent now. He was dying and a few minutes before he died 
a smile came over his pallid face as he tried to reach out his arms, 
saying just above a whisper: "There she is! There she is! Mother, 
Mother, I knew you'd come!" and with the smile remaining, he 
died. 

Take these suffering men as a whole, many knowing that they 
are mortally hurt, there is a resignation, a patient waiting for 
treatment and silent endurance that were pitifully heroic; con- 
federate gray and Union blue, side by side, forgetting all in their 
common fate; for our wounded prisoners are receiving the same 
treatment as our own men. 

Our regiment is niore largely represented here than any other, 
and several who escaped hurt are helping overworked surgeons, 
service that they would not have the nerve to endure under 
ordinary circumstances. 

Tlu- wounded and sick are lying on the ground, perhaps an 



118 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

army blanket under them and only a canvas cover above them — 
some lying in the shade of trees. 

Two hospital steamers are lying under the river bank, being 
loaded with those having received the best treatment that can 
be given here, and will sail to-night for Hampton Hospital, Fortress 
Monroe, but many will not live to arrive. 

It seems as if all the awfulness of yesterday's battle is gathered 
at this hospital; but there are the dead rudely buried where they 
fell; the wounded and others in the enemy's hands; the same 
things in the experience of the enemy, and, -by no means least, 
the broken hearts, bereaved affection and agony of soul as the 
awful particulars reach soldiers' homes, North and South. 

REGIMENTAL CASUALTIES AT DRURY'S BLUFF 

May 16, 18G4 

1 Captured and not heard from up to time of our muster out of 

service; supposed to have died in prison. 

2 Wounded, captured and died from wounds soon after at Rich- 

mond, Va. 

3 Captured, perhaps wounded, died in prison. 

4 Captured and exchanged or paroled. 

Supposed to be quite complete and correct, but not wholly so. 

Field and Staff 

Wounded: Lieutenant Colonel George F. Nichols, side, slight; 
Adjutant John L. Carter, lost arm and captured; 4 Sergeant 
Major Robert W. Turner, foot, slight. 

Company A 

Killed: John Balfour, Jr., John H. Hall, De Estang Johnson, 
Joseph Granger, Henry W. Persons. 

Wounded: Andrew J. Brumigin, died of wound; Charles F. 
Copeland, severely; Hubbard AY. Goodwin, head; William 
Hartman, finger; Peter Hamel, slight; George R, Thayer, 
shoulder; John S. Shippy, leg; William H. Groom, died. 

Missing: Amos Collins; 2 Adelbert Andrews. 1 

Company B 

Killed: Sergeant Wesley Kent, Lewis Brothers, Albert Van 
Buskirk, Lyman Manley, Joseph Casavah, William Cox. 

Wounded: Lieutenant James S. Garrett, slight; Henry Fi field, 
leg and head; Frank Casavah. severely and captured; 1 Frank 



- 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 119 

Hulgate, hand; William S. Burk, thigh and captured; 1 John 
Emery, hand; Allen Case, foot; Charles W. Harmon, neck; 
James Nolan, thigh; Lewis Lafayette, arm and thigh; Joseph 
Lapierre, Jr., arm; Darius McFaddcn, slight; John Casavah, hip. 
Missing: Daniel C. Brown, 3 Frank La Joe, 3 James Reay. 2 

Company C 

Killed: Eli F. Arnold, Erastus W. Leavitt. 

Wounded: Norman H. Arnold, slight; John S. Owens, breast; 
Sergeant Artemas W. Fay, slight; George H. Kent, severely; 
Zopher C. Rich, slight; Joseph La Moy, shoulder. 

Misting: Captain James H. Pierce. 4 

Company D 

Killed: Hiram Brown. 

Wounded: Sergeant Charles W. Higley, leg and arm; Reuben W. 
Mead, slight; Warren S. Wickham, hand; Eugene Bell, hip; 
John Calkins, arm; Oscar 0. Duel, leg; Hiram F. Dutton; 2 
Henry Flansburgh, head and arm; James McCormick, slight; 
Joseph Shortsleeves, side; Mallory Tripp, cheek; Martin Russell, 
arm; Alonzo Terrell, side. 

Missing: Sergeant William C. Duel, 2 Lewis Bartlett, 3 Anthony 
Miller, 1 Carmi Brown, 2 Joel Brown. 1 

Company E 

Killed: George W. Avery, Sylvester Sanborn, Orvis E. Walton, 
Wounded: Lieutenant Edgar M. Wing; 2 James O. Braley, side; 
Daniel H. Braley, eye; Wesley Barton, slight; Edwin M. Dailey, 
eye; Julius Neddo, arm; Collis H. Smith, head; Joseph Wick- 
ham, died of wound; George Farnett, slight; John McAuley, 
hand; John Williams, slight. 

Missing: Daniel L. French, 3 Frank Gonio, 4 Mitchell Fernet t, 1 
George W. Burns. 4 

Company F /• 

Killed: Lieutenant William H. Stevenson, Crosby GrofT, Hiram 
Sargent. 

Wounded: Captain Robert W. Livingston, shoulder, leg and 
foot, severely; Lewis Morse, slight; Silas S. Flagg, slight; Benja- 
min D. Shehan, shoulder; Joseph D. Hardy, hip; George W. 
Miller, died; John Kilborn, died. 



120 THREE YEARS WITH TPIE 

Missing: Oakley H. Smith/ 2 Mitchell Carte, 3 Leverrette Howard. 1 
Albert M. Conger, 4 William D. Huff, 2 Robert D. Eastman, 1 
Henry C. Westcott, 1 Samuel L. Mayo. 3 

Company G ' 

Killed: Sergeant Roswell Walsh, John A. Grimes, Lewis Aldrich, 
Charles C. Sexton. 

Wounded: John Bennett, arm; William H. Gates, foot; Martin 
Grandy, hand; Benjamin F. W. Monroe, hand; Lewis MeRae, 
face; Jonathan C. Norton, hand; William H. Parkis, body; Benja- 
min B. Perry, thigh; William S. Taylor, head; Charles Fenton, 
head; Martin Gardner, hip. 

Missing: Captain Dennis Stone, 4 David Bullis, 2 Richard Bills. 2 

Company H 

Killed: Phillip Miller, William Mason, Samuel Lavarnway. 

Wounded: Sergeant Thomas Timmons, shoulder; Paul Carter, 
face; Joseph Gough, died of wound; James June, face; Frank 
Johnson, hand; William Miner, mouth, severely; Lewis Mattoon, 
slight; Lucius Yatau, died; Adolphus Serrell, slight; Francis 
Benway, face; Thomas Fordham, body; John Hays, legs. 

Missing: Lieutenant James H. Pitt, 4 Melvin Harris, 2 Samuel J. 
Moore, 1 Enoch Cline.'- 

Company I 

Killed: John Kennedy, Richard D. Parks, Michael Prior. 

Wounded: Captain Henry S. Ransom, arm and lung, arm 
amputated; Miles E. B. Ransom, head; George H. Nichols, 
head; Theopolus Welcome, hand; Peter Hammel, hand. 

Missing: Henry Gonya, Jr., 1 Silas Ashley. 4 

Company K 

Killed: Captain John S. Stone, Franklin W. Moore, John 
Putnam, Myron A. Arnold. 

Wounded: Casper M. Baker, arm and leg; Henry Blood, wrist; 
Mark Devins, hand; William M. Moore, leg; Michael Wells, 
legs; Albert McDonough, hand; Lewis S. Matoon, shoulder; 
Joseph Gooseberry, arm. 

p Missing: Lieutenant Sam Sherman, wounded, 4 Silas Demo, 2 
Charles H. White. 2 Edwin S. Snell, 1 Ezra Paro. 1 




CAPTAIN- 
ROBERT W. LIVINGSTON 




/fK- _ 



CAPTAIN- 
EDWARD RIOGS 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 121 

We will leave our diary narrative for a few words concerning 
this battle in the light of afterwards. 

Drury's Bluff — also called "Drewry's" — was .distinctly one 
of the sanguinary battles of the Civil War. As it occurred while 
the greater battles of the Army of the Potomac were being fought 
and as it was a defeat, not much was said about it at the time. 

The battle line was some four miles long, reaching from the 
James to the Appomattox, with about 20,000 troops on each side. 
Our line consisted of the 18th Corps under Major General "Baldy " 
Smith, on our right, and the 10th Corps under Major General 
Gilmore, on our left. Not all of these Corps were in line, the 
division of General Ames of about 5,000 being at Walthall Junction, 
Hinks' division of 5,000 at City Point and about 3,000 being left 
in the Bermuda Hundred entrenchments. 

The battle was fought by the 18th Corps and severest in front 
of our, Brooks', division. The right of our brigade rested on the 
Petersburg Pike, connecting with Heckman's Brigade. As that 
brigade was surprised and practically captured, we were subject 
to a front, flank and rear fire in a dense fog, occasioning a serious 
"mix-up" of ourselves and even with the enemy, which was 
hinderingly embarrassing, and it is a wonder that we fought so 
long and escaped so well. 

The attack was wisely planned by the enemy, Jefferson Davis 
himself participating in the planning, and had the plan been fully 
carried out the whole Army of the James would have been put out 
of business. 

There were blunders. Our right was not protected, only a 
straggling force reaching from Heckman's Brigade to the James, 
so that that flank was easily turned. There was neglect in making 
our defensive works what they might have been. The largest 
failure in the Confederate plan was that of the Beauregard's right 
wing under General Whiting, who was to move against our 10th 
Corps when he heard firing on his left at Drury's Bluff. The 
woods, or the wind, or both, or Providence, prevented his hearing 
what was tremendously noisy to us, and Waiting did nothing, 
thus permitting us to get the help of our 10th Corps, which, 
however, did not become engaged to any extent. 

In the attack that morning were the enemy commands of 
Generals Ransom, Gracie, Lewis, Terry, Fry, Hoke, Colquit and 
others — the two leading brigades, Gracie and Terry, suffered 
severe loss. 

According to Badeau's Tabular Statement, the best data we 
know of, the Federal loss in this brief battle was 390 officers and 



122 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

enlisted men killed, 1,721 wounded and 1,3*90 missing — total 3,501. 

General Beauregard reported his casualties as 354 officers and 
men killed, 1,G10 wounded arid 220 missing- — total 2,184. Total 
casualties on both sides 5,084, which is a large aggregate for so 
short a time of actual battle and a very large percentage of the 
number engaged. 

Because of its position our regiment captured quite all the 
Confederate prisoners taken, and it was pleasant to observe 
that the moment a prisoner surrendered, all animosity ceased 
and he was protected and cared for as a friend and comrade, 
almost considered a guest of honor! 

We also lost one battel y of three or four guns, and four or five 
stands of colors — those of regiments constituting Heckman's 
Brigade captured first off in the fight. 

It was a lost battle and of more significance than that; the 
Army of the James had lost its splendid opportunity. 

It is unfair to criticize a campaign after we know all about the 
conditions which during its operation were unknown; but it 
seems an unpleasant fact that the Army of the James was not as 
promptly aggressive and persistent as it ought to have been. 
The actions at Port Walthall, Chester Station, Swift Creek, and 
so forth, if continued and resolutely pushed, would have revealed 
the then weakness of the defending force and Petersburg might 
have been an easy capture during the first few days after our 
landing at Beimuda Hundred. 

The Army of the James was given a fine opportunity for "doing 
things" and large expectations were Justified; but following 
Drury's Bluff the army became, as General Grant so aptly ex- 
pressed it, "bottled up"- — incapable of enterprise in its then 
location. 

The "Up the James " was but one of the cooperating campaigns 
of the "Battle Years" of 1864-65, — all being in fact one great 
campaign, planned by General Grant to end the war. 

There were unhappy failures in parts of the "Great Plan" 
and this of the Army of the James was a large one of them. But 
all these failures proved only costly delays. 

A Drury's Bluff Story 

As already noted, one of the prisoners captured by the enemy in the battle 
of Drury's Bluff was Lieutenant Edgar M. Wing. He enlisted in Company A 
of Glens Falls and was promoted to a lieutenancy in Company E. He was 
mortally wounded and left on the field. As a prisoner of war he was visited 
by a Captain Hendrick of a South Carolina regiment. Both belonged to the 






ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 123 

Masonic fraternity, which becoming known, the Confederate officer asked 
Lieutenant Wing, who had but a short time to live, what he could do for him. 
Wing gave him his watch and sword — both presents from his father and 
both inscribed with a memorandum of the gift — asking that they be in some 
way returned to his father. The Confederate fellow-mason said that he 
could probably care for the watch, but the sword belonged to the "spoils 
of war''; but he would try and get permission to retain it and try to return 
it as requested. He made Wing's last hours as comfortable as he could and 
secured permission to retain the sword. 

The watch he afterwards handed to a Union prisoner about to be exchanged 
with promise that the prisoner would try and have it reach Lieutenant Wing's 
father, but it never reached Judge Wing. The exchanged prisoner may have 
died; the watch may have been lost or stolen, or it may have been kept by 
its custodian. 

Later on Captain Hendrick visited his family in Charleston, S. C, taking 
Wing's sword with him. He told its story to his wife and daughter, the latter 
but a child, yet much interested. Her father left the sword, particularly 
charging his little daughter with its care until it could be returned. She 
received the charge seriously and felt the obligation of the trust. 

When General Sherman marched north from Savannah, Charleston 
people felt sure that because of that city's prominence in the rebellion, Sherman 
would delight in its capture; so there was a large migration from Charleston 
to supposed safer localities. 

The Hendrick family gathering their valuables, including Wing's sword, 
went to Columbia, S. C. 

Sherman, knowing that Charleston would be practically captured by 
passing its rear, moved along a route which took in Columbia, so that the 
Hendricks had left Charleston to avoid Sherman and put themselves in Ins 
way at Columbia. 

As Sherman approached Columbia, some of its people and refugees removed 
farther into the interior, and others buried their valuables and waited results. 

The Hendricks buried their silver, etc., and the sword, under the porch 
of their dwelling, where it remained undisturbed as Sherman went "marching 
on." The Hendricks and the sword went back to Charleston. 

The war ended, officer Hendrick had been killed, I believe, and his family 
went to friends in New Orleans, storing their household goods and the sword 
in Charleston. After a few years they returned to Charleston and the sword 
reminded Miss Hendrick, now a young lady, of the trust committed to her 
by her father. 

The sword had the name of Lieutenant Wing and the designation of his 
regiment engraved upon its hilt. Miss Hendrick began a correspondence. 
She learned from Albany that the 118th was raised in Essex, Clinton and 
Warren counties, and she wrote to the postmasters of the principal places 
in these counties, including Glens Falls, inquiring for relatives of Lieutenant 
Wing. 

J remember very well when Postmaster Van Cott (Glens Falls) brought 
that letter to me and the pleasure it gave us in advising the Wing family- 



124 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Miss Angie Wing, sister of Lieutenant Wing, wrote Miss Hendrick inviting 
her to visit her and bring the sword. The invitation was accepted, and these 
ladies became fast friends. 

To go a little further with this story. Later on, a gathering of Warren 
County Veterans encamped for a few days at Lake George, opposite Fero- 
wood Cottage, on the Bolton Road, Postmaster Van Cott of Glens Falls, 
President of the Warreri County Veterans' Association, in command. 

One afternoon Hon. F. A. Johnson addressed the encamped veterans and 
told the story of Lieutenant Wing's sword. The occupants of Fernwood 
Cottage, from piazza and open windows, could plainly hear Mr. Johnson's 
address. Short!}' after his address he was told that a lady boarding at the 
cottage wished to see him. He called and met the now Mrs. Sinclair, who 
with her husband were on their honeymoon trip. She had heard Mr. Johnson's 
story and being its heroine desired to thank him for his pleasant mention of 
her part in returning the "Sword of Drury's Bluff." 

The fact of her being at the cottage became current among the veterans, 
and they insisted on some sort of recognition of the lady's fidelity. Com- 
mander Van Cott was embarrassed — did not know just how to satisfy the 
veterans and in no wise offend the lady. He drove down from Lake George 
the next morning and insisted that I return with him and help him meet the 
situation. As we returned, the veterans fired a small howitzer a few times 
and seemed very much excited. 

We decided to call on the lady and consult her wishes. We told her how 
interested the veterans were, how much they wished to honor her, to meet, 
her, etc. She was very agreeable and willing to join in any plan we might 
propose. It was decided that the veterans come over and form in front of 
the cottage, that I should rehearse the story, that she make reply and the 
veterans be permitted to pass by and take her hand. She consented, but 
said that neither she nor her husband could undertake a reply, but she would 
ask a friend of hers, a Mr. Fuller of New York, to do so. All this was done 
with many hearty cheers and evidences of enthusiastic appreciation. 

To conclude the "celebration" the veterans were formed in a semi-circle 
on the lawn, and a photograph was taken with her in the center of the group. 
The photograph was called "An Angel of Peace," and many copies were sold 
by the enterprising photographer. The New York Tribune of a few days 
later published nearly a full column, giving the story of the sword and of the 
Lake George incident, interestingly told, probably written by Mrs. Sinclair's 
friend, Mr. Fuller, who had so excellently responded for her to the veterans. 

May IS. Our brigade moved to-day about one hundred rods 
to a new position in the fortifications. We are slashing the 
woods along our front and others are strengthening the works, 
which are becoming the finest we have ^cvn since we left Fort 
Ethan Allen. The enemy is also doing the same tiling. JSharp- 
shooting, or "sniping," continues and artillery occasionally joins 
in, but with little effect. 



t 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 125 

May 19. Spades are " trumps "; but rains have made mud of 
our digging, putting newly made roads in bad condition and 
keeping our clothing soaked. We are located on ground high 
enough for good drainage, so are better oft' than those on lower 
ground. Soldiering, stripped of its glamour, romance, battle 
excitement and patriotism; estimated from its mud, dirt, vermin 
and fatigue; its periods of burning heat, shivering cold and misery 
of rain; thought of with ranks depleted by disease and conflict 
deprived of civilian privileges and civic influence; recognizing 
the much that is brutish in it — well, soldiering and war, considered 
in an ex parte abstract sort of way, is depressingly repulsive. 
This kind of thinking came to me last night in the darkness and 
lonesomeness when I ought to have been sleeping and dreaming 
of military glory. 

May 20. There was considerable noise last night from artillery 
and rifles and we were up and ready quite all night. 

The advance rifle-pits on our right, on General Ames' front and 
a part of Terry's, were captured this morning, and a sharp fight 
ensued to regain them, unsuccessfully on Ames' front. On Terry's 
front Colonel Howell's Brigade gallantly retook the works, but 
with' severe loss; many killed and wounded. The loss to the 
enemy must have been at least equally great and included the 
serious wounding and capture of their commander, General 
Walker. 

We have again moved our camp about half a mile to the right. 

May 21. Forts, gunboats and entrenchments kept up firing 
through most of last night and we were " under arms" till morning. 

May 22. Sunday. The morning service was one of the 
"roaringest" kind. At about 10 o'clock the more than usual 
quiet was broken by volleys of musketry and heavy artillery fire. 
A general attack has been expected, and we thought that this was 
its beginning. Our batteries opened from right to left and soon 
the deep bass of the gunboat guns joined in the chorus. The 
enemy, either satisfied of the uselessness of the attempt, or not- 
intending anything serious made but a feeble charge. We lost 
some prisoners and many wounded, while quite a number of 
prisoners were taken by us. A caisson belonging to a nearby 
battery exploded killing and wounding several artillerymen. 

May 2n. Our works are slowly approaching completeness; 
two lines of abattis, well laid, bristle along our front; redoubts 
have been thrown up in advance of the main line, while a chain 
of interior works has been laid out. The magnitude of the works 



certifies to the industry of the troops. 



12G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Two regiments under Colonel Dutton (21st Connecticut) sup- 
ported by our Brigade, reconnoitered the enemy's position to-day. 
Colonel Dutton was mortally wounded. He was of the Regular 
Engineers and a gallant young officer. Most of the troops of the 
18th Corps have orders to prepare for a move in the morning. 
As we can't get out in front, we shall likely undertake some flank 
or rear movement. 

General Butler has issued an order prohibiting the sale . of 
whiskey by commissaries to officers of a greater amount than 
one gallon per month, and this only on orders approved by Divi- 
sion commanders. Four quarts per month, however, is a big 
allowance of raw ''commissary/ 7 Rations of whiskey are just 
now issued to the men. They say, "swallowing it suggests the 
idea of a 'wide awake' torch-light procession going down the 
throat." Very little intemperance has been noticed during this 
campaign, though there are unquestionably some officers who 
differ from Sardanapalus, whom Byron makes say: 

The goblet I reserve for hours of love, 
But war on water. 

May 27. This morning the 118th moved from its place in 
the entrenchments to a large field in rear, about a mile from 
Bermuda Hundred landing. Inspections were made and defi- 
ciencies in arms and munitions supplied. 

The sick and unfit for strenuous duty were lefr in the entrench- 
ments. Our regiment now numbers scarcely one-half of what it 
did twenty days ago. It is evident that we are going to reinforce 
the Army of the Potomac. The force we are with consists of some 
16,000 infantry, sixteen guns and a squadron of cavalry, all 
under command of General ''Baldy" Smith and called the ISth 
Corps, although the command includes portions of Ames' and 
Devens' divisions of the 10th Corps. 

It is supposed that General Butler is left with some 10,000 
infantry and 3,000 or 4,000 cavalry, and the artillery in the forti- 
fications, to hold the Bermuda Hundred front and City Point. 

May 29. Took transports at Bermuda Hundred and started 
down the James. Generals Devens and Burnham are with our 
regiment on steamer Geo. Leary. Our route was a reversion of 
that of the 4th and 5th inst., to Yorktown, then on up the York 
River to West Point, where we entered the tortuous Pamunkey 
again. It was frequently the case that vessels of our fleet seemed 
to meet each other and to pass each other within a stone's throw 
and yet all were going up this crooked river. When we first went 
up this river with Dix's expedition in 1803, we were fairly puzzled 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 127 

by this narrow, twisting, sluggish stream. Its banks are so low 
that the steamers seemed gliding over land. We moved with 
some caution, fearing enemy mines and torpedoes. 

May 30. White House was reached at noon. The roar of 
artillery is heard in the direction of Hanover Court House. Orders 
are to be ready to march at 8 a.m., but for some reason did not 
start till 5 p.m. We were pushed forward, but by some mistake 
in orders received by General Smith 'we marched several wear}' 
unnecessary miles and lost some time in arriving where we were 
much needed, at Cold Harbor. It was an all-night, hot, forced, 
dusty and fatiguing march, with fears that the enemy might 
know of our coming and undertake to cut us off. 

June 1. This forenoon we began to mingle with the Army of 
the Potomac. They were just as tired, dirty and ragged as our- 
selves, and just as cheerful. They welcomed us with cheers, 
and as soon as it was known that Burnham commanded our Bri- 
gade, Brooks our Division, and "Baldy" Smith our Corps, we 
were again cheered. Burnham, Brooks and Smith were "house- 
hold words" in the Potomac Army — names which that army 
still claimed as a part of its fame. We related our past month's 
experience, while they told us the thrilling stories of Spottsylvania, 
The Wilderness war-path, Totopotomoy and the bloody North 
Anna. 

The activity of artillery in our front proved the enemy suf- 
ficiently near, while the rapid movements of brigades and divisions 
indicated formation for attack. It was soon known that an attack 
was to be made by the 6th Corps (Wright's) and ours. Our 
forced all-night, hot and dusty march from White Plouse rather 
unfitted us, yet we felt anxious to prove ourselves to the veterans 
under Grant and Meade. 

We had little time to rest, for we were soon ordered into posi- 
tion and advanced to within range of the enemy's guns. Tired 
as we were, we gained enthusiasm as we advanced, and by the 
time we began to hear the "zip," "zip" of minnies, the excitement 
made us forget our "tired feeling." 

We found the main line of the enemy's entrenchments some 
fourteen hundred yards distant, with his entrenched picket line 
some three hundred yards nearer. There was some open ground 
between us, well covered by the enemy's artillery. 

There were delays; but at six o'clock our Corps with the 6th, 
charged under a heavy enemy artillery and rifle fire, captured 
the enemy's advanced entrenchments with about 250 prisoners 
and reached close to his main line. Here the fire was so furious 



128 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

that we fell back under cover of woods and began entrenching 
our position. In this short time our 18th Corps lost over 1000 
killed and wounded, but our regiment suffered little. Do not 
know what the 6th Corps loss was, but it must have been as large. 
Thus commenced the bloody Battle of Cold Harbor. 

It would be vain to give any description of that "hell of scene 
and sound" upon which the sun of to-day set. The very earth 
trembled under what did not seem the work of man alone. The 
whole night was a series of furious attacks on the part of the enemy 
to regain what he had lost; but the morning found us the more 
strongly entrenched. Some idea of the storm of bullets can be 
obtained when it is said that many trees six or eight inches through, 
were so perforated with bullets as to be easily pushed over; in 
one case a tree actually fell — cut down by bullets. The work of 
the shell and solid shot could be traced in every direction by the 
shattered limbs, trees and torn earth. 

Our entrenchments are so shallow that we had to he down 
behind them for protection, and men were killed and wounded 
behind them. 

June 2. The 2d Corps, Hancock's, is arriving and form- 
ing on the left of the 6th, which is on our left, so that our corps 
forms the right in our sector of the battle line. It is another 
scorching day and wherever troops or wagons move the dust 
hangs in clouds and settles upon everything — all uniforms look 
alike and all foliage dust covered. 

The assault to-day, in our section of the field, was by our Corps 
and the 2d and 6th. We advanced under a heavy artillery 
and musketry fire from the well-entrenched enemy. We carried 
the advance rifle-pits, but the fire grew more fierce and a cross- 
fire of artillery swept through from the right of our corps to the 
left of Hancock's. Notwithstanding this destructive fire we went 
close up to the main hue of entrenchments, but not being able to 
carry them, fell back to our morning position. 

The loss has been heavy, especially of brigade and regimental 
commanders. The severest part of the fighting was over in an 
hour, but the loss in the three corps exceeded 4,000 killed and 
wounded. The loss of the enemy, fighting behind entrenchments, 
was, of course, much less. 

June 3. We are under constant fire, but have some protection 
from our hastily improvised trenches. Yesterday afternoon it 
commenced to rain and with little intermission continued through 
the night, much to our comfort and especially to the comfort of 
the wounded on the field, for it laid the dust, and wet clothing had 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 129 

a cooling effect. Many wounded are lying between the lines and 
to try and reach them is to dare death, yet many were brought in 
during the night at that risk. 

The enemy's entrenchments have become so strong and so 
fully manned as to seem unassailable; and yet they are to be again 
tried! Troops were massed in our rear and a charge was made 
over our position. The first column marched over us to the assault 
and they fairly melted under the enemy's direct and cross-fire. 
Many wounded crawled back to our line, some dying as they were 
pulled into our trenches. We saw here more of the most horrible 
wounds we have ever seen. 

The second column moved over us to the assault with the same 
result. We felt convinced that the attempt was useless. But 
orders came to us to participate in a third charge. Major Pruyn, 
commanding our regiment, who had been slightly wounded, 
addressed the regiment in pertinent and manly words of courage. 
I do not believe a heart faltered in this terrible hour; but it would 
be no discredit if many prayed that it might not be their duty to 
move out to seeming slaughter. Sheltered as we were and lying 
flat upon the ground, our corps loss had already been large — so 
merciless and continuous were the missiles of the enemy. We 
anxiously waited for the order " Forward "■ — but it did not come, 
the attempt evidently being abandoned, for the present. 

The dead were about us, yet we could not expose ourselves to 
bury them. We piled up bodies in front of us and covering them 
with earth, made them serve as a defense. The dirt would some- 
times sift down and expose a hand or foot, or the blackened face 
of the dead. A chapter of incidents might be related in this con- 
nection — heroic deeds of even drummer boys in getting at the 
wounded under cover of darkness, getting water and food to 
them. These have been long hours among the ''ghastly fruit of 
the battle," under a scorching sun with sleepless watching, weari- 
ness and exhaustion. Among our losses were Lieutenant Reynolds 
killed and Captain Parmerter losing a leg. Lieutenant Stephen B. 
Little of the 96th New York was killed. He had been promoted 
from Sergeant of Company A of our regiment. 

June 4-11, The eight days following were made up of all that is 
wearing, wearying and depressing. We were constantly reminded 

!of the enemy's presence and activity by musketry and artillery 
fire. Work in making approaches and strengthening our trenches 
is difficult and dangerous and we are worn out and spiritless. 
Under so Ions and constant physical and mental strain; with 
hot weather and only surface water to drink; without vegetables 



130 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

and with our meat from cattle scantily fed and exhausted from long 
driving; dead men, horses and mules abounding; the country 
lying low and marshy; conscious of the loss of life; thinking that 
nothing had been gained and believing further effort futile — 
altogether a disheartening and discouraging aggregation of 
circumstance. Cold Harbor was regarded by the Army of the 
Potomac as its "Descent into hell." 

Am only mentioning what occurred along our small part of the 
miles-long battle line of our army, all, also, constantly engaged. 
Many hard things are said of General Grant. He is called a 
" butcher," "a slaughterhouse boss" and much else, because of 
his hurling men against what plainly appears to us as impossi- 
bilities. An army is supposed to be an autocracy where men 
obey and keep their opinions to themselves, but it doesn't need 
a ballot to find out what soldiers think about Cold Harbor. 

We did not then know the reasons for keeping the enemy engaged to prevent 
Lee from sending reinforcements against Hunter who was marching down 
the Shenandoah Valley against Lynchburg, and also to prevent his early 
discovery of Grant's flank movement to the James. So it was that our fierce 
criticisms of our Commander came through ignorance of his "reasons why." 
General Grant in his Memoirs said: "I always regretted that the last assault 
at Cold Harbor was ever made." 

Notwithstanding our night efforts to get our wounded, many 
were still so close to the enemy's entrenchments as to be completely 
covered by his fire, and hundreds of the dead of both sides were 
lying there unburied — mostly ours — and the wounded were 
dying. 

General Meade proposed a truce for bringing in the wounded 
and burying the dead on the 5th of June; but no cessation of 
hostilities took place until the afternoon of June 7, from six to 
eight in the evening. 

Comparatively few of the wounded have survived the several 
days' exposure and lack of needed food, water and attention. 

The blue and gray mingled in burying their respective dead 
where they lay. The armistice permitted us to stand up safely, 
which was a relief, even for so short a while. 

By June 12 that prodigy of military maneuvers, Grant's change of base, 
was well under way, but not then to our knowledge. While that great army 
with all its cumbersome appurtenances was passing our rear by its left flank 
and hastening, in spite of swamps and rivers and other obstacles, to the 
James, we — the 18th Corps — remained to mask the movement and deceive 
the enemy; but we did not then know the "why" of it all. 




Captain 
JOSIAH H. NORRIS 




Captain 

JACOB PARMKRTER 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 131 



REGIMENTAL CASUALTIES AT COLD HARBOR 
June 1-11, 1864 

Our casualties were 1 officer and 8 men killed, 23 men wounded, of whom 
5 died — a small loss considering all the circumstances; our position chanced 
to be favored. 

The following list of casualties in the USth, while not complete, maybe 
considered fairlv correct as far as it goes: 

Major Pruyn wounded in foot, slight. 

Company A — Killed: Lieut. Michael Reynolds, Joseph Docket, "William 
Dougherty. 

Company B — Xo report. 

Company C — Wounded: James H. Estes, James S. Ling. 

Company D — Killed: Henry R. Putnam. Wounded: Amasa Hill, Jeffreys 
Pritchard, Oscar Tyrel, Laurence Lambert. 

Company E — Wounded: Captain Jacob Parmerter, leg amputated. 

Company F — Killed: Robert Bomyea, Leonard Mix. Wounded: Daniel 
S. Binnings, John Tyrel, Samuel S. Wilcox, Horatio Wade. 

Company G — Killed: Stephen Lapeer. Wounded: Benjamin F, W. 
Monroe, died; Truman H. Pasko, died. 

Company H — Killed: Orrin Sutherland, Jr. Wounded: Paul De Jordan, 
Bartlett Stone. 

Company I — Killed: John Holland. Wounded: Sergt. Eddie B. Ferris, 
died; John P. McCune, William H. Monty, Joseph Ploof, Joseph Picket. 

Company K — Killed: Emorv A Hon*. Wounded: Edwin B. Bullis, 
Stephen K. Grady — Grady died. 



Note. According to General Humphrey's The Virginia Campaign cf '64 and 
[Go the casualties of the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor. June 1-3, not 
including the ISth Corps, were: wounded brought to hospitals, 6,642; kitted, 
1,760; missing, 1,537. Of the missing most must have been killed, for we 
lost few prisoners. 

He estimates the loss of the ISth Corps at 1.900 wounded and 500 killed 
and missing. He does not give the casualties after Juno 3. 

Our regiment was, somehow, spared its full share of loss at Cold Harbor, 
although constantly under fire. 

June 12. After dark we quietly retired from our "perdition" 
and hurriedly marched to White House, IS miles of heat and 
dust, where transports were awaiting us; but delay occurred from 
lack of enough transportation. 

June IS. We finally embarked, steamed down the Pamunkey 
and the York to Fortress Monroe and on up the James. 

Reaching Wilcox's Landing we were surprised to find the 
2d Corps crossing the James on a pontoon bridge and learn 
that the whole Army of the Potomac was coming. We reached 
Bermuda Hundred by sundown of the 14th. We started out, 



132 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

crossing the Appomattox, carefully feeling our way, towards 
Petersburg and by daylight of the 15th encountered the enemy's 
pickets, driving them into their entrenchments on the higher 
ground beyond. Coming in sight of their* fortifications, with our 
strong line of skirmishers lying in a ravine pretty close up to the 
works, we halted and took shelter in a woods where we were shelled 
by the enemy's artillery. Here our Major, Charles E. Prtiyn, 
commanding the Regiment, was killed. While standing up, 
viewing the work soon to be charged, a shell struck him in the 
breast, tearing out his young life. Captain Dominy now came 
in command of our Regiment as senior officer, our Colonel and 
Lieutenant Colonel having been left on the Bermuda Hundred 
front, sick, when we left for Cold Harbor. 

Our artillery was brought up, after some delay, the salient 
of the enemy's works was shelled for a while and at 7 p.m. the 
order "Forward" was given. 

The salient was on high ground with a ravine in front, but 
easier than expected, and with a comparatively small loss we 
captured the work with several pieces of artillery and about 300 
prisoners. With cheers the captured guns were turned towards 
Petersburg and fired — just as a u Here-we-are" greeting to 
that city. Hinks' troops on our left and Martindale's on our 
right were also successful; so we are largely in possession of the 
main line of the defenses of Petersburg. This capture indicated 
that the force defending the city was small. 

The advance brigades of Hancock's 2d Corps (which had 
been delayed because of some mistake in orders) began to arrive, 
but contrary to our expectations no further forward move Was 
made. 

It was a lovely moonlight night. The roofs and spires of Peters- 
burg could be plainly seen a couple of miles away, and to our right 
and rear the lights of the Bermuda- fiundred camps were visible. 
About midnight we were relieved by the 2d Corps and lay 
down for rest, believing that the morrow would give us Petersburg. 

June 16. This hot, cloudless morning witnessed a rare group 
of General officers. Grant, Meade, Smith, Hancock, Burnside, 
Brooks, Burnham, and several others, with their staffs, had 
gathered on the height where our regiment lay, and with their 
glasses searched the view which the position commanded. Much 
astonishment was expressed at the comparatively small loss 
attending the capture of these strong works. On some officers 
asserting that their capture without loss was wonderful, a colonel, 
whose command had been kept to the rear, ventured to correct 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 133 

the statement by saying that he "had one man shot dead!" 
This naive correction was received with more than a broad grin 
by those who heard it. Poor inexperienced man, he had no sense 
of proportion — had not yet learned that a few hundred, or so, 
had come to be considered no loss at all. 

The enemy is hard at work building new defensive en- 
trenchments. 

Our pickets have advanced to the edge of a ravine beyond 
the captured works, through which runs a small tributary to the 
Appomattox. Reinforcements were plainly seen coming from 
Petersburg. We begin to fear that our further advance will be 
no easy matter. The 9th Corps commenced joining us by noon 
and it was hours later before these veterans had all reached us. 
Artillery and musketry could be distinctly heard and the smoke 
of battle plainly seen along the Bermuda front across the Ap- 
pomattox. Butler was evidently taking advantage of the with- 
drawal of a portion of the enemy's forces from that front for 
the reinforcement of Petersburg. At about six o'clock p.m. 
the 18th, 9th and 2d Corps advanced. The enemy was soon met 
and stubbornly disputed our progress. The fighting was con- 
tinued all night, and from the roar of musketry on our left it 
was more fierce there than with us. 

June 17. The 5th Corps has joined us, and the battle con- 
tinues, more heavily on our left. 

June IS. There is a lull in the thunder this p.m. AYe have 
passed the ravine, and our skirmishers have "dug in" on the 
ridge beyond. The works to our left of those captured on the 
loth have been carried, and the enemy has been driven to his 
newly constructed inner line of defense. The right of our Corps 
rests on the Appomattox, and it is said that the left of our army 
envelopes Petersburg to the south. The enemy is becoming 
well entrenched and it is evident that further movements in hue 
of battle are impracticable. Siege operations must be commenced. 
The 118th lies across the track of the City Point & Petersburg 
railroad. Sharpshooting and picket-firing continues, to the 
imminent danger of every exposed head. It is evident enough 
that Grant's second well-planned capture of Petersburg has failed, 
and, again, because not promptly and resolutely executed.* 

* In the Report of General Grant of the Annies of the United States, ISBNS'* , 
dated July 22, 1865, he makes the following mild but distinct criticism of 
General "Baldy" Smith: "General Smith got off as directed and confronted 
the enemy's pickets near Petersburg the next morning, but for some reason, 
that 1 have never been able to satisfactorily understand, did not get ready 
to assault his main lines until near sundown. Then, with a part of his com- 



134 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

June 19. The work of entrenchment is being prosecuted with 
vigor. The pickets advanced last night as far as possible, and 
within a stone's throw of the enemy's videttes. Our men of this 
line were at intervals of from three to five paces. Each man began 
" digging in" for himself, using the half of a canteen, tin plate or 
some other crude tool. The yielding earth soon rewarded this in- 
dustry by giving protection. This was continued by digging 
trenches from one picket-hole to another. Reinforcements were 
sent to them with spades and picks, and by morning a very con- 
siderable protecting trench had been established. The work of 
widening, deepening, and of getting covered ways to the rear was 
continued under engineer officers. The troops of the main line in 
the rear are building works above ground, under fire. The enemy 
is similarly employed and similarly annoyed by our fire.* 

Thus were commenced the siege entrenchments about Peters- 
burg, which later were the wonder of all who saw them; and 
thus commenced our two months' trench life — the most trying 
months of our service. Weeks of constant anxiety and watching; 
weeks of exposure to an inhospitable climate in its worst season; 
long weeks of tedious monotony, except the diversion furnished 
by the assaults, sorties, experiments and inventions of an alert 
and energetic foe and our own counter-efforts and maneuvers 
for advantage. It was one day lying in the dirt under a scorching 
sun and out of reach of any friendly breeze; the next wading in 
mud and water up to the knees. I have seen soldiers in the trenches 
up to their waists in water, with their ammunition about their 



mand only, he made the assault and carried the lines northeast of Petersburg 
from the Appomattox for a distance of over two and a half miles, capturing 
fifteen pieces of artillery and three hundred prisoners. This was about 7 p.m. 
Between the line thus captured and Petersburg there were no other works, 
and there was no evidence that the enemy had reinforced Petersburg with a 
single brigade from any source. The night was clear — the moon shining 
brightly — and favorable to further operations. General Hancock, with two 
divisions of t he 2d Corps, reached General Smith just after dark and offered 
Smith the service of these troops as he might wish, waiving rank, naturally 
supposing that Smith knew best the position and what to do. But instead 
of taking these troops and pushing on at once to Petersburg, he requested 
General Hancock to relieve a part of his line in the captured works, which 
was done before midnight. 

"By the time I arrived the next morning the enemy was in force." 
* General Humphrey in his The Virginia Campaign of '04 and '£-5, 
says: ''The Medical Director states that during the attempt to take Peters- 
burg, fr<»m the loth to the ISth of June, the number of wounded brought to 
hospitals from the 2d, 5th and 9th Corps, was 6,210. Taking the usual pro- 
portion of killed, we have 1,240 — a total of killed and wounded, 7,4">0.'' 
He estimates the killed and wounded of our Corps, the lsth, at 700. 

He says, "The slightly wounded, not going to hospital, must have been 
500 to 600." 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 135 

necks — not for an hour, but for a day. It was impossible to 
secure drainage of the entire line, and the heavy rains common 
to the South would soon flood the trenches. The first month, 
however, of this life was hardly dampened by a shower. From 
the 3d of June to July 19th no rain fell, and every day was hot. 
The earth seemed pulverized and the very air was filled with 
dust. It penetrated our clothing and mingled with our perspira- 
tion. We inhaled the " sacred soil" with our breath, swallowed 
it with our rations and absorbed it through every pore. We could 
scarcely get sufficient water to drink, much less for needed ab- 
lutory purposes. Movements of wagon trains, artillery or troops 
were revealed to the other side by the clouds of dust raised by 
such movements. The very foliage was clothed in the dusty 
"butternut" uniform of our enemy. 

We had planted a strong abattis along our front, built sand- 
bag lookouts for sharpshooters, and felt pretty well protected 
in front, when the enemy's Chesterfield batteries across the 
Appomattox on our right began to trouble us. These batteries 
were so situated as to enfilade our trenches. When they got the 
range, they furnished more ''amusement'' than we desired. To 
remedy this we erected heavy traverses at frequent intervals all 
through the trenches, and great as was the labor, we had the 
satisfaction of seeing many a missive spend its force in these 
traverses, which, otherwise, would have swept through the trench. 

Our next trouble was cohorn mortars. One day the "Johnnies" 
showed many signs' of amity calling out, "Yanks, stop shooting 
and we will." We did stop, and very soon, from out the earth, 
as it seemed, rose the line of friend and foe. Jokes were passed, 
conversation indulged in, and there was little to show our real 
business relations. Many apprehended that this episode meant 
something! After an hour, or so, the "Rebs" suddenly sunk 
into the earth again, and while we were wondering at the sudden- 
ness of their disappearance, we heard several subdued explosions, 
and soon small cohorn shells exploded among us. We had never 
been "cohorned" before, and were at a loss to know from whence 
these things came. They kept coming, and we soon knew that 
they had planted a cohorn mortar battery in our front. We had 
to "stand and take it," and they did us some damage. We soon 
guessed the remedy, and bomb-proofs were at once added to our 
trenches. This gave us those strange and curious underground 
compartments and "dug-outs" which excited much comment. 
They were as diverse as the minds of their builders and the 
opportunities for construction. 



136 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

There is nothing so trying to a soldier's nerves as cohorn shells, 
and it takes experience and a practiced eye and ear to tell where 
they will fall. There is something about a cohorn grenade with 
its hissing fuse dropping just over you, that will chill in the hottest 
day; and it is only when in a bomb-proof, with protecting earth 
over you, that you feel like defying these murderous missives. 
The boys used to render the dubious language of the fuses into 
the plain English interrogation, ''Where are you? Where are 
you?" and they would hiss the words through their teeth to 
imitate the sound. 

It would take a volume to describe our trench life, and words 
cannot picture the experiences of that long siege. At night the 
exhibition of ''fireworks" was grand. One battery would throw 
a few shot to get some desired range and tins would be replied 
to from the other side. Another battery would join the dispute, 
and another, till from the Appomattox to the South Side Road, 
there would be a roar and blaze of artillery. The large mortar 
shells would mount to above the low-hanging clouds, and descend- 
ing with increasing velocity, seemed like angry meteors falling 
from the skies. Their arched path could be distinctly seen at 
night by their burning fuses, crossing and interlacing each other 
as they went forth from side to side. Shot and shell were thrown 
into Petersburg, and their crashing into buildings could at 
times be heard. 

After a while, by common consent, sharpshooting ceased at 
sundown. Pickets were posted in front of both armies, and 
consequently "Reb" and " Yank" would be within a short distance 
watching each other the night long. Men of both armies would 
crawl out of their "holes," stretch themselves and breathe the 
better air; sing, blackguard each other, etc. At about sunrise, 
the pickets having been withdrawn, the trenches policed and 
the sharpshooters in position, notice would be given by a shot 
from the first side ready and then woe to any exposed head. 

Daily familiarity with these experiences actually bred contempt. 
We thought less of our dangers than we did of the heat, dirt and 
confinement in the trenches. 

Every day had its incidents — serious, humorous and mixed. 

A prisoner said that quite often citizens of Petersburg and 
Richmond came to the Confederate trenches with sporting rifles 
to try and "bag" a Yankee or two. One day the buckle plate of 
my sword belt was hit. a fragment of the bullet making a slight 
flesh wound, and soon after, our color bearer, Jo. Hastings, was 
hit on his arm by a much spent ball. Both of these bullets were 



ADIRONDACK REGLMEXT 137 

small and evidently from a sporting rifle and, as we were ia oar 
trenches, they must have come from some one up a tree back of 
the enemy's line. By watching, a puff of smoke was observed in a 
distant tree; the attention of our sharpshooters was directed 
to it and many a shot was fired into that tree;. It was reported 
that a man was seen falling from the tree. Anyhow, these "little 
lead pills" stopped coming. 

One morning we lacked one of Berdan's sharpshooters to "man" 
the sand-bag lookout in front of one of our regiments. An Irish 
soldier wanted to take the place and was permitted. He began 
to imagine that he saw enemy heads and fired with such unusual 
frequence as to attract the attention of both sides. Every time 
he fired he made a mark in the sand to indicate a dead Confederate. 
The enemy sharpshooters "got after" this ferocious lookout, and 
after a while our soldier fell from Iris place and, lying silent in the 
trench, was supposed to be killed and no attention paid him. 
Finally, he called his Captain by name, adding, "Don't yer know 
one av yer best min is dying?" He then received attention, and 
it was found that he had a bad wound in his hand and wrist from 
a bullet that had come through the "porthole" of the sand- 
bags. As he was being helped towards the field hospital he said: 
"Git me score in the sand of thim I killed. 'Tis bin a damn bad 
mornin' for the Rebs!" — although his foolish shooting had only 
provoked his own wounding. 

One moonlight evening, when both sides were top of the trenches, 
the other side was particularly npisy. That day, or the day before, 
the enemy had captured a large herd of our beef cattle which 
were corralled in our rear near Fort Powhattan, and there was 
hilarity over it. We were loudly and boastingly invited to roast 
beef and beefsteak feasts. They were vociferously noisy, when 
an Irishman shouted with a distinct "old sod" accent: "Say, 
you Johnnies, stop yer hollerin' so soldiers can slape!" Back 
came, "Hello Pat! How long you been over? Suppose you are 
soldiering for the Yankees' — beautiful greenbacks." 'Well," 
said the Irishman, "yees is fightiir for money that has nayther 
beauty nor value." Laughter followed from both sides with 
cheers on our side for the Irishman's rejoinder. - 

Then from the other side: "Come over with us, Pat; we are 
fighting for honor and you are fighting for money." 

"Thin we is both fightin' for what we most nade." 

This second witty "hand-out" was followed by more laughter 
and more cheers. As those on our right and loft inquired for 
the cause of our hilarity and being told, they laughed and cheered 



138 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

— and so on until this incident probably traveled our line by 
repetition from the Appomattox to the south and west of Peters- 
burg, for we could hear the laughter passing; on to our left. 

There was fighting more or less every clay especially on our 
left where our line had been much extended, thus thinning out 
the enemy's force to meet the extension; but as he had the inner 
and shorter line, less troops were required. Our line now measured 
over thirty miles, crossing two rivers, the 2d Corps being north 
of the James for a while. Our tedious trench life was wear- 
ing us out; fatigue, dirt and vermin were depressing our spirits 
to a decidedly visible extent, so, for a little relief, it was arranged 
that we occasionally have a few days out of the trenches, by 
retiring to a pine wood a mile or so to our right and rear close 
down to the Appomattox. The enemy soon found our hiding 
place and commenced a nightly shelling of these woods from 
batteries across the river. This obliged us to make bomb-proofs 
even here for our protection. The trenches were not as pleasant 
as the woods, but were so much safer as to leave little choice. 
These woods were also below our rear batteries, and we suffered 
from the bursting of poor shells intended for the enemy across the 
Appomattox, but prematurely exploding. 

Our bomb-proofs in the woods were dug some fifteen to twenty 
feet long and about four feet wide, with earth left for "benches" 
along the side, like an omnibus,' and deep enough for sitting 
upright. The excavation was covered with logs and these by the 
excavated earth — entrances at each end. 

One night a shell split oil the top of a tall pine, diagonally, 
giving a sharp point to the part which fell so perpendicularly 
and with such velocity as to pierce our earth and log roof, entering 
the ground between our feet, without the slightest, hurt to any 
one in the bomb-proof. 

Another night, when we were in these woods, Lieutenant 
George H. Wing of the 14th Artillery visited us. He had served 
in the Glens Falls Company A of our regiment and been promoted. 
Shelling that night drove us hastily to our bomb-proofs and kept 
us there till morning. In the morning Lieutenant Wing, who 
tented with Lieutenant Adams, could not find his vest which 
he had left in the tent, in the pocket of which was a valuable 
watch given him by his father and engraved with his name. 

Lieutenant Adams, in a sense Wing's host, was much concerned. 
Believing that none of our men would take Wing's watch, he 
wanted some action taken to search the men of our neighboring 
regiment. This we thought a rather delicate 4 thing to do. Adams 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 139 

made much stir about the matter. Later he tried to button his 
vest and found it too small for him, and it was thus revealed 
that in his haste to reach the bomb-proof, he had grabbed Wing's 
vest instead of his own, and the watch with it. 

After all the reasonable fuss Adams had made to find the thief, 
it was called a "good joke on Adams." 

Colonel Hammond and Captain Barker of the 5th New York 
Cavalry visited us July 25. Fine Essex County soldiers and gentle- 
men. (After the war Colonel Hammond was elected Congressman 
from our district for two terms.) 

July 30, 1864- Last night a division of the 2d Corps relieved 
us from the trenches after dark and at about 10 o'clock we marched 
to the position of the 9th (Burnside's) Corps. 

There have been vague rumors of a wonderful mine being 
prepared under some portion of the enemy's line, and it was now 
understood that it was ready for explosion. 

We were to support the assault of Burnside's Corps following 
the explosion. All the troops were in position by two o'clock 
this morning. The mine was to be fired at half-past three. We 
were instructed to stand on tiptoe, with teeth apart, to prevent 
anticipated injuries from the concussion. The hour came, passed, 
and at half-past four there had been no explosion. Some made 
an awkward appearance in their efforts to carry out instructions 
and with open jaws, raised heels and an anxious countenance, 
awaited the great event. This anxious attitude grew less as the 
delay lengthened. 

At near 5 o'clock a dull heavy thud was heard and felt and 
the enemy fort beyond us was lifted into the air. The concussion 
was nothing compared with that which followed. Some eighty 
heavy guns and mortars and as many field guns massed in our 
rear poured forth their wrath and fairly stunned us with their 
deafening thunder. For a short time only did this storm of 
shell pass over our heads. The firing ceased and Ledlie's Divi- 
sion (colored) of the 9th Corps advanced, but reaching the 
crater made by the explosion, piled into it in a confused mass for 
protect ion. These colored troops had had very little training or 
experience and were unfit for this important service, and they were 
not accompanied by their commander. Other troops were sent 
forward and occupied some of the abandoned works, but there 
was delay. 

The enemy soon rallied from the consternation occasioned by 
the explosion and heavy artillery fire, and having batteries favor- 
ably located, commenced a terrific fire upon our advanced force 



140 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

and across the space between the works. He had suspicion, 
perhaps some knowledge, of the mine and had constructed works 
in rear, wisely providing against the possibility. He was also 
promptly reinforced with men and artillery at this point. The 
crater became a slaughter pen, and it was soon' evident that the 
large and reasonable expectations from the explosion of our mine 
had failed for lack of promptness and efficiency in carrying out 
well-laid plans. Our Corps, being held in reserve, was not engaged. 
About noon our attacking troops were withdrawn but lost severel}' 
in retiring to our lines. 

Our loss has been heavy in killed, wounded and prisoners, 
probably fully 4,000. We took some prisoners, and while the enemy 
suffered considerable loss, it was probably much less than ours. 
The colored troops suffered severely; those captured received 
little mercy. 

The mine was on Confederate General Johnson's front at the 
center of Ellicott's brigade, called "Ellicott's Salient," and only 
about one hundred and fifty yards from Burnside's line. The 
main gallery of the mine was over 500 feet long with two laterals, 
each over 30 feet. There were eight magazines, each charged 
with one thousand pounds of powder. The crater resulting from 
the explosion was about 150 feet long, sixty wide and twenty-five 
deep. 

We withdrew at dark some distance to the rear and remained 
there until morning. This action will be called the "Battle of 
the Crater." * 

August 1. Our Brigade is now in a ravine just in rear of our 
trenches as a reserve force. Here we are somewhat protected 
and expect some rest. General Orel now commands our Corps, 
Stannard our Division. Burnham still commands our Brigade 
and for some time I have been on his staff as Inspector General, 
and enjoy my association with him and his military family. 

It is plain that we are worn out, disheartened, discouraged, 
not only our men but officers up to those in high command. We 
are tired in body and depressed in spirit, and could not be depended 
upon for endurance of even a small active enterprise. We would 
be found wanting in physical strength. Sickness is increasing 
and every day furnishes its hospital delegation. In fact men have 
died in the trenches of disease. Weather continues extremely hot. 

August 9. The rest promised in this ravine is a failure, for 

* Some years after the war I visited this erater, then grass-covered with a 
good-size peach tree at the bottom, a sort of living ineuiorial to the hundreds 
buried beneath. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 141 

every night has its alarms, and we are almost constantly under 
arms or on quick march from one point of anticipated or real 
attack to another. The weather continues hot and sultry. Siege 
casualties and sickness dwindles our ranks and our brigade is 
almost down to regimental dimensions. But these conditions 
will compel some remedy, so we'll patiently wait. 

The Chaplain of another regiment seemed pleased to-day in 
showing a Bible which, carried in the breast pocket of a soldier, 
evidently saved his life. A bullet had pierced the Old Testament 
part and lodged in the first Chapter of St. Matthew's gospel; 
otherwise it might have found the heart of the pious soldier. 

The exclusive efficiency of this sort of protective armor is some- 
what discounted by the fact that a pack of playing cards had 
rendered the same service in case of a soldier of another regiment, 
a bullet having perforated two-thirds of the pack while in his 
breast pocket. 

August 10. ^Ye are again in the front trenches and alternate 
between the trenches and the ravine. There is but little choice 
in these places of "residence." 

A staff officer who has been stationed at City Point told me 
this: Several officers were at General Grant's headquarters one 
evening telling stories, experiences, etc., when one of them said, 
"As there are no ladies present, I'll tell you a — - — ." General 
Grant interrupted by saying, " Don't forget that there are gentle- 
men present," which confused the story-teller to the extent of 
his not proceeding. The incident is decidedly complimentary to 
our commander. 

August 17. This morning in riding to Corps headquarters I 
stopped for a while at our big mortar battery called ''The Peters- 
burg Express," which every half-hour or so sends its fifteen-inch 
spheroid shell into Petersburg. Even in the daytime we can, 
when standing behind the mortar, see it for a while as it arches 
high and drops out of sight. If there is not too much noise from 
other artillery the explosion in the city is sometimes heard. The 
mortar men have facetiously chalk-marked these shells to some 
44 made-up" street and number address for delivery in Petersburg. 

August IS. Yesterday afternoon a heavy rain storm, or cloud- 
burst, visited us. We needed the rain but not in such sudden 
quantity. Our Brigade was in the ravine through which a small 
almost dried-up stream ran. For two hours it. rained in torrents, 
making a rushing river through the ravine, sweeping away some 
of our tents and carrying away every loose thing it reached. 
Several of our men barely escaped drowning. The contents of 



142 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

sutlers' tents floated by and the bodies of two drowned soldiers 
caught among the bushes. Several lives were lost and much 
army property. 

When I went to inspect our trenches, found them filled with 
water in many places, men in mud and water to their waists. 
This Virginia soil " liquidates " easily and our entrenchments were 
washed down and greatly damaged. Many bomb-proofs were 
filled. Our men had been a long time without a bath, but this 
water was too muddy to minister to cleanliness. Our men are 
certainly in a sad plight; but the enemy is similarly situated. 
It will be days before our trenches are repaired. 

August 20. Our brigade has moved to the trenches near 
"Fort Hell." Here the lines are nearer together than at any 
other point of the line, and sharpshooting and artillery firing 
the most constant. An attack from the enemy is expected at 
this point. 

Brigade headquarters are in a barn, through which shell and 
even bullets pass. We are on a height of land that overlooks 
the trenches each way for some distance. The scene from here 
to-night is terribly magnificent. Our right, to the Appomattox, 
is much of the way a line of fire. We have the welcome news 
that our corps will be relieved by the 10th Corps, we to go to the 
Bermuda front! 

August 21. Colonel Cullen (96th New York) and myself tried 
to get some sleep last night in the cellar of a destroyed dwelling, 
but a solid shot scattered the stone of the cellar wall so promiscu- 
ously as to prove worse than an alarm clock — but we did get 
some sleep. 

Back this morning to our old position in the trenches. 

August 27. The rest of our corps having already been relieved, 
a brigade reported to relieve ours. We moved out of the trenches 
and our relief moved in. This nearness of the enemy seemed 
dangerous to those who relieved us; but our boys "consoled" 
them by telling how many men had been killed in this section 
and that angle, how good a range the "Rebs" had on such and 
such a place, etc. — Some truth, some exaggeration, some lies. 

We moved to the rear, and when once at a safe distance, where 
we could stand erect without danger, feel and breathe the pure 
air, our joy could only be expressed by all the antics of a lot of 
schoolboys. Getting where we could see each other, we beheld 
as dirty, unshaven, unshorn and ragged a lot as shamed Falstati 
from marching through Coventry. We reached our new camp 
on the bank of the James at night. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT - 143 



Regimental Casualties before Petersburg 
June 15-August 27, 1SG4 

This list is not complete and, of course, does not include the 
large number of men sent to hospitals sick, many of whom died. 

Killed: Major Charles E. Pruyn, June 15; Sergeant Charles W. 
Higley, June 30; Alvin T. Burt, June 15; Jeremiah Buckley, 
June 20; Antonia Felio, July 9; William Wood, July 9; Edward 
L. Humphrey, July 30. 

Wounded: John C. Robillard, no date; Isaac Trombley, July 1; 
Wilber L. Abare, June 30; John D. Cobb, June 15; Ashley Wood, 
no date; Selah Randall, no date, died of wound, July 25; Elihu 
B. Wilson, July 8; Eclley B. Ferris, no date, died of wound, July 5; 
Jeremiah Mnllin, July 17. 

August 28. Sunday, but we are busily employed in shaving, 
hair cutting and bathing. The place seems a paradise. We did 
not know the world was half so beautiful. The grass seems so 
green, the air so sweet, and all so comparatively quiet. To be 
sure, we can hear bombing artillery around Petersburg, but it is 
not crashing in our very ears. The enemy entrenchments are in 
sight near by, but inactive. There is a habitual " stoop," however, 
noticed among the boys, as if still in the trenches; and when some 
rogue will ''zip, zip," through his teeth, in imitation of a minnie, 
the hearers will often give their accustomed "duck." We 
ought to have had a thanksgiving service to-day. 

Since the 1st of May till now we have not taken off our clothes 
for rest, and since the 6th of May, except while on transports, 
have not been out of reach of the enemy's fire! For one hundred 
and thirteen days we have been in constant danger, apprehension, 
unrest and uncertainty. Have slept in dirt and mud, in rain 
and heat; fought, marched, dug, and some of us survived. 

Our camp on the bank of the James is pleasantly situated, 
and with new clothing, we soon returned to that state of cleanliness 
usual to a well regulated regiment under ordinary circumstances. 
Our view embraces the James from Aikin's Landing to Druiy's 
Bluff. The famous Howlett House Battery (enemy) looks us 
in the face, and just below us, across the river, Butler is at his 
improvement of the James at Dutch Gap, cutting a canal in 
rear of Farrar's Island, thus shortening a long bend in the James. 
Our fleet lies a little to the rear of our right and up the river we 
can see the smokestacks of the Confederate rams. Between 
these fleets rock-loaded old craft have been sunk so that one can- 
not go up or the other come down. 



144 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

On the bank of the river is the lofty " Crow's Nest" signal and 
observation tower, from which the spires of Richmond can be 
seen, and at its foot is the hundred-pound battery of the same 
name. 

The defenses along the Bermuda front are so complete that our 
boys say "they can hold themselves." The forts, batteries and 
redoubts along the line have been named for the fallen heroes of 
our army, the central work being named Battery Pruyn, in honor 
of our late major. 

August 29 to September 26. These were fairly quiet days. There 
were occasional duels between the Howlett House and Crow's 
Nest batteries which interested us as the mammoth shot passed 
to and fro. The Howlett House battery has fired occasionally 
at our Crow's Xest observation tower, but never seriously dam- 
aged it. Our big battery has replied now and then, and when 
standing behind our guns we could see the shot as they arched 
to the other side. The bluff on which this battery is located con- 
sists of sand for some feet with clay underneath, and it surprised 
us to find that the enemy's shots which enter the sand penetrate 
only a little, while those striking the clay penetrate from ten 
to a dozen or more feet, proving that loose sand has much greater 
resistance than compact clay. The enemy tried to destroy our 
signal tower and we tried to destroy their guns, but nothing much 
resulted, except a big noise. 

The work of reorganization, drill, supplying deficiencies in 
arms, clothing and equipage, with picket duty and occasional 
fatigue-work occupied us while we remained here, and we improved 
much in health and spirit. 

Our Brigade commander and his staff (on which the 118th is 
well represented) labored steadily to make our Brigade all that 
could be expected in efficiency. Our Brigade dress parades drew 
spectators from neighboring camps. Guard mounts, church 
services, etc., were considered the most regular and interesting 
of any in the corps. 

The men of our Brigade who pass the best inspection are de- 
tailed for headquarter guard, and Michael Cummings of our 
Company, D, usually achieves this honor. He is a faithful 
soldier and always neat in his dress and equipment. This after- 
noon the Brigade commanders of our Division met at our Brigade 
headquarters with their stall's, all in full dress, to start out for a 
round of calls at other headquarters. I remained on duty and 
Cummings on guard. As the somewhat brilliant cavalcade 
started off in the sunshine 1 overheard Mike observe, as he paced 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 145 

back and forth on his beat, unaware of any one within hearing, 
"Fine feathers make fine birds." 

The 13th N. H. Vols, has been transferred from our Brigade 
and the 9Gth New York and 5th Maryland Veteran Volunteers 
are added, giving us five regiments. The coming of the 96th is 
a peculiar pleasure to us, raised as it was in the same locality as 
the 118th, and its ranks filled with our home acquaintances. 

General Burnham and his Adjutant General, Captain Clark, 
received leave of absence early in September, and went to their 
homes in Maine. Colonel Cullen of the 96th, being ranking 
colonel, came in command and I was detailed as Adjutant General, 
continuing, also, as Inspector General on our staff. 

One evening at quite a social gathering in my tent at brigade 
headquarters, all were happy and lively in conversation, except, 
it was noticed, that our Captain Dobie, usually jolly, was reticent 
and appeared gloomy. When asked, "Why so lugubrious?" 
he replied not to mind him, but go on enjoying the fact that if 
we survived the war there was nothing which a grateful country 
could give that we might not aspire to. As for himself, he could 
not help feeling depressed whenever he seriously thought of his 
personal limitation — his cruelly distinct handicap; he some- 
times just naturally lost all spirit and ambition. 

"Boys," he said, "it is a hard thing to be boycotted by the 
constitution of the country you are fighting for." 

(With mock solemnity, he continued: "I am sure you will under- 
stand and appreciate what is gnawing my vitals when I tell you 
that it is my misfortune to have been born in Canada and thus 
rendered ineligible to the Presidency of the United States! I 
am solemnly telling you, it is an awfully discouraging nmtude. ' 
Having perpetrated. his joke, he joined in the hilarity to which 
he had contributed — all very like Dobie. 

August 31. Isaac Davis and a Mr. Cushing of Glens Falls 
visited us with some sort of scheme to reenlist men in advance 
of their service expirations, to apply on the quota now required 
from their locality, but it could not be clone. 

I have become impressed during the last few months with the 
size of the home burden of worry which many of our men are 
bearing. I have been shown letters from wives, some of them 
beautifully patriotic, mentioning privations, hardship and actual 
suffering, because the bread-earner is serving his country at 
$13.00 per month, and the home cost of living so sky-high. 

One wife writes: "Fd ra'ther go hungry than ask for the aid that 
was promised when you enlisted — it is so put off, so grudgingly 



14G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

given, when given at all, that it makes me think that they think 
we ought to be in the poorhouse or jail." 

Some letters showed conditions which must be disheartening 
to soldiers. I have written several letters to those who ought 
to see to it that home relief is provided 

One young wife wrote her soldier husband: "I have had to go 
out to domestic service to care for myself and our boy; but keep 
well, dear, and don't get crippled, for when you get back I want 
you to lick a fellow who has insulted me. He is a coward and it 
will be an easy job." 

September 1. I have to-day mustered and inspected the 10th 
New Hampshire, 118th and 96th New York, 8th Connecticut and 
5th Maryland. Also the Pioneer Corps, Sharp shooter detach- 
ment, Division Provost Guard, Band and all detached men — 
from sun-up to sundown full day, but am not so tired as to 
forget that two years ago to-night we left Plattsburgh. 

September 2. Torday inspected the Quartermaster, Commis- 
sary, Ordnance, Medical, and Sutler departments of our Brigade, 
their stores and supplies. I rather enjoy these regular and some- 
times special inspections, especially when they do not involve 
too much criticism. 

We are a bit proud of our present Brigade dress parades and 
they attract the attention of neighboring commands. We have 
a fairly good band, a fine parade ground and each regiment lias 
its prescribed maneuvers for reaching the line. Lighted by the 
glow of the evening sun it makes an impressive moving military 
picture. 

News of Sherman's capture of Atlanta came to us September 3. 
On the 7th our Division was reviewed by Major General Gibbon. 
On the 18th, Sunday, an elaborate and impressive Brigade church 
service was held, attended by several generals and their staffs. 
On the 24th a salute with shotted guns was fired along the whole 
line of our entrenchments in celebration of General Sheridan's 
victory at Winchester. 

September 2S. General Burnham returned from leave of ab- 
sence yesterday and there was a council of war at Corps head- 
quarters last ni^ht which I attended, with General Burnham, 
as a staff listener. Something is to be done and right now. Orders 
are that men be supplied witli two days' cooked rations and be 
ready to inarch. 

Edward Kiggs of Glens Falls, formerly a captain in our regi- 
ment, and much respected, came to camp to-day to verify enlist- 
ments for the credit of his town. 1 confided to him that we 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 147 

expected immediate activity and he urged me to intercede with 
General Burnham to let him act as civilian aide on the General's 
staff. Burnham refused, much to Riggs' disappointment. Burn- 
ham said: "It will be bad enough for soldiers who have to go, 
but it will be no place for a citizen. If he should be wounded 
or killed it would be said, ' Good enough for him, he had no business 
to be there.' " 

Note. Later on Captain Riggs and Sheriff Brown of Glens Falls were 
sent south to enlist negroes to count on the quota of men required from 
their town, and both went down with the steamer Melville off Cape Hatteras. 

Our regular daily camp program was continued on the night of 
the 2Sth until tattoo, when staff officers went through the camps 
with orders to move at once and with quietness, tents to be 
left standing in charge of the "unfit for duty" and of a force of 
hundred-days men which have been camping in our rear. Our 
brigade camp is in full view of the enemy and we did not wish 
him to even guess at our leaving. We marched to Corps head- 
quarters where our regiment was supplied with the Spencer seven- 
shooting rifles, turning in our old Enfields. This indicated, 
as I knew, that our regiment would have the advance or skirmish 
hue in the present movement. The Spencer is the most effective 
arm known to us, and this supply was the first to infantry that 
we have known of in our army. 

We continued our march to the James near Aikin's Landing. 
Here we found large detachments of the 18th and 10th Corps, 
the former commanded by General Ord and the latter by General 
Birney — our Division in command of General Stannard. 

We also found our engineers laying a pontoon bridge of some 
60 boats across the James and so quietly that we could scarcely 
hear them at work. 

While waiting in the woods I overheard the conversation of 
some of our men. One said that if he survived the war he would 
try and get to Boston and hear the great organ in Tremont Temple, 
dwelling on his fondness for music. Another who had before 
enlistment worked in the Warrensburgh Tannery, broke in, sayinsi: 
"The sweetest music for me, just now, would be the clang of the 
Burhans' tannery bell! I 'spoct it's ringing just about now for 
the midnight shift. I'd like darned well to hear its peaceful 
sweetness, right now!" 

At about 3 o'clock a.m. of the 29th the pontoon bridge was 
completed, covered with earth to muffle the sound of men, horses 
and artillery in crossing, and our brigade crossed. 

The 118th and 10th N. II. were deployed as skirmishers and 



148 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

ordered to advance through a cornfield. The night was dark, 
and our movement difficult and slow; often our line became 
separated and broken. General Burnham sent me to be with the 
right wing of our skirmish line. The enemy's pickets arc said to 
be about a mile away, upon a ridge which overlooks the James, 
but there was no indication that they had yet discovered us. 
We reached the foot of the ridge as. day began to break, and just 
as the sun arose over the forest top towards the east, we received 
the first fire from the enemy's videttes, secreted in the bushes. 

Looking back we could see a dark line of troops moving down 
the opposite bank of the river, crossing the pontoon bridge and 
winding across the plain towards us. The enemy outposts having 
delivered their fire, ran to their reserves in the woods under the 
scattering fire of our skirmishers. Horses were now sent to the 
rear, except those of General Burnham and staff; we remained 
mounted. Burnham's lumberman's voice was heard shouting 
along the line, "Heave after them — double quick!" " Heave' 7 
was a favorite command of his. 

At the edge of the wood we met the fire of the main picket line; 
but with a shout we plunged into the woods and drove them 
from behind a shallow trench line which they had for protection. 
The crack of our seven-shooters, the cheering of our men as they 
pursued the surprised " Johnnies" through the woods; the beauty 
of the morning and its bracing air; the forest clad in autumnal 
colors — all added spirit and enthusiasm. 

The chase through the woods was exciting and continued at a 
more than " double quick" pace. We passed through an outpost 
camp where food was still cooking and everything tokened hasty 
abandonment before breakfast. 

Of course, there was more or less firing at us from behind trees 
as the enemy fell back, and there were killed and wounded. We 
passed through the mile or so of woods and came to a clearing 
where on elevated ground' some fourteen or fifteen hundred yards 
distant, Fort Harrison, the principal work of the enemy's Chapin 
Bluff entrenchments, loomed up in the sunlight with heavy guns 
dotting its parapet. 

We waited briefly for the coming up of our Division for support 
when General Ord ordered our Brigade to "take the fort!" Our 
skirmishers moved on and our little brigade, with two of its 
regiments on the skirmish line, moved forward into the open. 
The brigade proceeded with arms at "right shoulder," bayonets 
fixod - — the 90th leading. 

The sunshine was reflected from their arms, flags fluttered in 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 119 

the little breeze there was and all gave the appearance of display 
rather than serious purpose. 

Nearly half of the distance between the woods and the fort 
was passed with little protest from the fort or its flanking works. 
But as the notion that the fort had been abandoned began to 
obtain, flashes of blaze and pull's of smoke were seen along its 
front, and the screaming contents of fifteen pieces of artillery 
passing over our heads went crashing into the woods in our rear, 
doing some damage to our reserves. The range was too high, 
but after a few shots some reached our advancing brigade. 

The skirmishers had crept up so close as to pour a constant fire 
upon the enemy gunners, making the handling of their pieces 
dangerous and difficult, for the guns were mounted en barbette. 

Burnham assembled his staff and we occupied a rise of ground 
with a good view of the whole field; but the group attracted shots 
from the fort. The artillery and rifle fire grew decidedly lively. 

My horse was standing near a fallen tree which was struck by 
an exploding shell. I was hit in the side by either a piece of the 
shell or of the tree, and almost knocked from my saddle. It was 
quite a blow and made me faint for a while. I feared it had broken 
a rib or two; but in the excitement I soon forgot it, although I 
had a "small misery" in my side for many days and a dwindling 
feeling of the blow for some weeks. 

Our brigade reached the foot of the hill on which the fort stood, 
and halted for rest. B} r some oversight in the construction of the 
fort, the guns could not be depressed low enough to reach our 
brigade. 

The enemy, seeing that the fort was the point of attack, began 
to rush reinforcements from works on his left, so that delay was 
dangerous. 

General Burnham sent an aide (Lieutenant Campbell of the 
118th) with orders for the halted troops to make the assault at 
once. Away went the aide mounted on a white horse, a moving 
target for many rifles. It was a perilous ride, but he reached the 
command safely. 

The charging troops advance, mount the ridge, pass over the mur- 
derous space before the fort, into the ditch, up the parapet, a brief 
hand-to-hand encounter and the flags of the 96th Xew York and 
Sth Connecticut are quite simultaneously planted on the work. 

The defending force did not all surrender, but mostly rushed 
for a "get away." 

Shouts go up, our reserves move forward at a double quick. 
Burnham and staff gallop to the fort, dismount and climb inside. 



150 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

A party of the 118th skirmishers now charge a redoubt on our 
left, having three pieces of artillery, and capture it. 

We were fired upon from the enemy's works on our right. All 
was commotion and confusion for a while; but we had the fort with 
its guns and about 150 prisoners, including the Lieutenant Colonel 
commanding. 

The captured guns were turned .upon the retreating enemy, 
but with more noise than effect. 

The gallant Burn ham entered the fort promptly and while 
sighting one of the captured guns was killed. It was a grievous 
shock to us, but why mourn his loss when the space behind and 
in the fort itself is strewed with the dead and wounded? Yes, 
but there was not a more brave and patriotic soldier among us 
all than Hiram Burnham. 

Our prisoners, thoroughly demoralized, and anxious for a safer 
place, hurried to our rear. 

On our left the enemy's works reached the James, terminating 
in a strong work on the bank of the river, protecting a pontoon 
bridge connecting with Drury's Bluff on the other side. We had 
captured some portion of these works including two lunettes, 
six hundred yards apart, with six guns. 

General Ord now endeavored to sweep down the captured en- 
trenchments to the work on the river bank, but this work was 
covered by the Confederate gunboats and by a battery in the 
rear and the attempt was unsuccessful; General Ord was severely 
wounded. 

In front of us, at some distance, was a second line of Confederate 
entrenchments with Fort Gilmer as its strongest point. Possession 
of this fort would give us command of the Chapin Bluff defenses 
and General Heckman's division assaulted the fort, but was 
repulsed with considerable loss. Later on, in the afternoon, 
General Birney's command of colored troops made a gallant 
attack on this fort, some of the men being killed in climbing the 
parapet: but it was repulsed with heavy loss, the fort having 
been considerably reinforced. 

On our right, our troops drove back the advance of the 
enemy on the New Market Road and captured the first line 
of entrenchments running from Fort Harrison in a northeast 
direction. 

All the while there was lively artillery firing upon the foit, 
including the big 1 guns of the enemy's gunboats. The gun- 
boats, after a while, were quite successful in putting their projectiles 
into the fort; Unpleasant visitors but doing no great damage. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT .151 

About noon General Grant arrived at Fort Harrison and after 
making a few inquiries squatted himself on the ground and com- 
menced writing, — dispatches we suppose. He seemed altogether 
indifferent to the fire we were under, which, however, was true of 
the hundreds of others around him. 

General Grant, believing that the enemy would not, if he could 
help it, leave us in possession of this important position, the 
nearest Richmond of any of our lines, ordered a continuance of 
our work in " reversing" the fort for our defense and making it a 
wholly enclosed work. He also ordered a line of entrenchments 
constructed, running from the fort to the James just above Dutch 
Gap to connect the captured line with the river, and to "hold 
Fort Harrison by all means." 

This has been a long and exciting day. Our division, not much 
larger than a normal brigade, is reported to have lost about GOO 
killed and wounded — the loss of officers being unusually heavy. 

September 30. Although we had no sleep night before last and 
were under fire all day yesterday, we worked all through last night 
on the captured fort and on our new line of entrenchments to the 
James and under continual fire. 

Captured prisoners say that General Lee with large reinforce- 
ments, has arrived, and that ten Confederate brigades are concen- 
trated at and near Fort Gilmer to recapture Fort Harrison. 

Work on the fort was hurried and quite completed by noon 
and assignment of men for its defense made. The 118th with its 
Spencer rifles was placed at the salient angle of the new part of 
the fort. 

General Weitzel commands the 18th Corps — third change in 
command, because of casualties, since yesterday morning. General 
Stannard commands our division and the fort. All of our division 
is in the fort and Stannard proposes to defend with rifles only, 
and orders that our fire be reserved until the assaulting lines 
emerge from the brush and bushes in our front. All our light 
artillery is removed from the fort. 

At about 2 o'clock this afternoon twelve guns opened upon our 
left and center, the enemy's infantry advancing in solid formation 
on our right. When our fire began their lines withered, wavered 
and retired. Quickly re-forming they advanced again, and being 
again repulsed, fell back, re-formed and, reinforced, advanced the 
third time, coming this time very near; but our fire was too 
destructive for their success. 

The efficiency of our seven-shooters was fully demonstrated in 
this battle and their effect was visible as each of the three assaults 



152 THREE YEARS WITH TPIE 



came towards our salient. There was a fascination in using these 
rifles, and it was difficult to stop the firing even upon the out- 
lying wounded when the enemy retired. 

We were short of ammunition for our seven-shooters after the 
second assault and Captain Brydon of our regiment, Staff Ordi- 
nance Officer, brought up a four-mule wagon load just in time 
and under a fire which killed or wounded the mules and wounded 
some of the men who went out to bring the ammunition in. It 
was a brave act and loudly cheered. 

This was the first time we had fought behind such complete 
defenses and while there were killed and wounded, our loss was 
very small compared with the fearful experience of the enemy in 
his open assaults, which were splendidly brave. 

In the third and last assault many nearest the fort surrendered, 
for to retire meant death. When comparative calm came and our 
normal feelings returned, we beheld a sickening sight. Our front 
was littered with dead and wounded. In little gullies and slightly 
protected places where wounded had crawled, we could see bodies 
in heaps. Night came on with rain, but our worn-out men must 
remain where they were posted with guns in hand and ready for 
what might happen. 

When darkness settled down some of our men crawled out 
among the dead and wounded with canteens of water to minister 
to the wounded; they brought in some of them, while others 
crawled to us themselves. Several Confederate flags were also 
brought in. 

One of our men brought in a diary taken from a dead Con- 
federate officer, which I retained. The last entry was " Friday, 
September 30, 1864," and showed that his regiment had marched 
during the night before from the south side of the Appomattox. 
He mentioned that General Lee had arrived and was sure that Fort- 
Harrison would be retaken. The owner's name did not appear, 
but from reading I guessed that he was Lieutenant Colonel of 
the 51st X. C. 

Note. After the war I did my best to get this diary to some of this soldier's 
friends but without .success; advertised it in Charleston, vS. C, papers and 
wrote many letters. 

General Stanhard, commanding the fort, lost his right arm in the 
second assault and four of his stafT were wounded. So large has 
been our loss of officers that Colonel Cullen, 96th New York, 
who commanded his regiment yesterday morning and our brigade 
in the afternoon, now commands our division and takes me with 
him as Adjutant General on his staff. 



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GRANT UNDER FIRE AT FORT HARRISON 

Prom "Campaigning -with Grant" 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 153 

After the third assault, in the lull following, we sent out a few 
sharpshooters as a picket of observation. Franklin Johndro, 
Company A of our regiment, was in this detail and found some 
twenty-five of the enemy hiding in the bushes, not daring to reveal 
themselves so near the fort, waiting for darkness to retire, or 
perhaps, and probably, to surrender, which would be the safest 
thing to do. Anyhow, Johndro, with his seven-shooter and near 
by help, if needed, persuaded them to "come in" with him. 

Note. For this gallant act Johndro received an honor medal from Presi- 
dent Lincoln, as authorized by act of Congress, in recognition of distin- 
guished service. 

October 1. Still rains, and we are all wet to the skin and worn 
and weary, especially feeling the loss of sleep; but happy that we 
held the fort. 

From prisoners it appears that yesterday's assaults were by 
Longstreet's Corps commanded by Anderson, with Law, Bratton, 
Clingman, Colquit and others commanding divisions and brigades. 

The dead between the lines have not been buried nor the 
wounded cared for. We sent out a flag of truce proposing an armis- 
tice for burying the dead, we to take the wounded as prisoners. 
The latter proposition was not agreed to, and all through the day 
the wounded have been suffering and dying — a most pitiful 
condition. It seems to me that we would gain very little in having 
these wounded as prisoners. We would have them to feed and 
care for, and if permitted to be taken by the other side it would be 
a long while before many of them would be able to render service. 

This afternoon the enemy opened with a cohorn mortar battery 
doing small hurt, but making it uncomfortable for us and com- 
pelling the building of bomb-proofs. Both sides are hard at work 
strengthening their respective works. 

One of our men told me this morning that after we crossed 
the James he had been oppressed with the conviction that he would 
be killed. A letter from his mother told of her dream that he 
had been killed; he had himself dreamed of being mortally 
wounded just after crossing some river, and had earnestly prayed 
to be spared. He expressed his faith and gratitude in this 
homelv phrase: "Gosh! praying has the 'knock out' on dreaming, 
all right." 

I have known of other instances of soldiers' premonitions of 
death which did not mature. It is easy to imagine and magnify 
premonitions. 

October 2. Rained last night and until noon to-day, when it 
cleared oft' hot. 



154 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

A flag of truce from the enemy proposed an armistice for burial 
of the dead and conceding the wounded as our prisoners, and 
soon details of men from both sides were between the lines gather- 
ing the dead for scant burial and bringing in the wounded. Scores 
have died from exposure and want of attention. Our ambulances 
were gathered at the fort and loaded with these mutilated men, 
man}- of whom cannot survive, even with the aid our hospitals 
will give them; they have been too long neglected. 

The result of this movement north of the James is important 
in many respects. It cooperated with a similar move against the 
enemy's extreme right, south and west of Petersburg; caused 
an extension of his lines which he could illy afford; lost him an 
important position and gave us the nearest approach to Richmond 
yet attained. 

Regimental Casualties at Fort Harrison 
September 29 - October 1, 1864 

Not complete, but thought to be correct so far as given. 

Wounded: Lieutenant Colonel George F. Nichols, commanding 
regiment. 

Company A. Wounded: Sergeant Cass C. La Point, Hosea Day. 

Company B. Wounded: Sergant Merrill Perry, Simeon Tredo, 
Oliver H. Moore, Benjamin Surprise, Antoine Parker. 

Company C. Killed: Martin Lindsey. Wounded: Orren E. 
Beedy, died of wound ; Edgar Lewis, Thomas Missue, Harvey Stan- 
ton, Loir "Wells. 

Company D. Killed: James D.Flausburgh. Wounded: Patrick 
H. Dugan. 

Company E. No report. 

Company F. Killed: Daniel W. Allen. Wounded: Lieutenant 
Henry J. Adams, Eben Clark, Chauney Denton, John Ormston; 
Ormston died of wound. 

Company G. Missing: James E. Sexton, supposed captured. 

Company H. Wounded: Captain David F. Dobie. Missing: 
John Mohan, supposed captured. 

Company I. Wounded: Michael Almond, Henry M. Johnson, 
died of wound; Thomas Kelly, died of wound; James McMullin. 

Company K. No report. 

Note. After the war it appeared that the enemy's loss in the assaults of 
September 30 was over 2000. Do not know what his loss was on the 20th. The 
Federal loss in the whole movement north of the James, on the 29th and 30th, 
killed, wounded and missing, was 2272. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 155 

October 3-20. The name of Fort Harrison has been changed to 
Fort Burnham in honor of General Burnharn who fell in its 

1 capture. 
We have been in the trenches, here and there, moved about 
where most needed; under fire most of the time and responding 
to several night alarms, so we have had but little rest. 

One day we were visited by Generals Grant, Mead and Butler 
and part of their staffs, quite a cavalcade but very little display 
in their fatigue clothing — no martial glitter. 

Mr. Wood of Clinton County came to get the soldier vote for 
President. It is reported that of 390 votes all but one were for 
Lincoln. Mr. L. L. Lee of Port Henry came for the Essex County 
soldier vote. 

! Colonel Cullen is relieved from command of our division by 

General Carr, and consequently I go back to brigade staff, retaining 
command of company. 

Was surprised when Colonel Schley of the 5th Maryland showed 
me a letter to the Governor of his state, approved by Major 
General Gibbon and Brigadier General Devens asking my ap- 
pointment to the vacant Lieutenant Colonelcy of his regiment, 
but I couldn't think of leaving my regiment and ended the propo- 
sition with thanks for the compliment. I was the more surprised 
because in my staff inspection of this regiment I had considerably 
criticized its discipline and efficiency. 

October 21. Our division was to-day reviewed by General 
Marston, so we conclude some new movement is contemplated. 

We understand that General Longstreet is now in command of 
the Confederates along the Bermuda front and on the north side 
of the James and we hear of fighting on our right, over towards 
White Oak Swamp. 

Two objectionable habits were somewhat in evidence among 
our men in the earlier days of the regiment — gambling and 
profanity. A continued influence against these things and the 
growing sober and better sense of the men have largely lessened 
these evils. 

Card playing is a constant addiction, but seldom for " stakes, " 
and while vehement words are used for cheap emphasis of excited 
conversation, strict violation of the second commandment is 
more and more' relegated to the "necessity of mule-drivers.'' 
I think that it can be claimed that the service has improved and 
strengthened the character of our men — including mule-drivers. 

October 26. Orders issued requiring three days' cooked rations, 
which means "business." 



156 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

At a gathering at headquarters last night the conversation 
focused on the prolific subject of the "Army Mule." It was a 
symposium of incident and comment upon the mule's patience, 
endurance and its value as an army auxiliary. Its splendid ef- 
ficiency was praised and the sufficiency of his "battery" was 
both seriously and humorously discussed. 

It was thought that many pensions would be deservedly granted 
for disability caused by. the "kick of a mule," and it was conceded 
that to have driven mules all through the war would be a heroic 
record. 

One officer declared that in an unfortunate skirmish he could 
not have escaped capture had he not mounted a stray mule and 
"walloped" him back to the main line of his comrades. 

Another officer claimed (pretended) that he remembered the 
incident and said, "I'll tell you what became of that mule. It 
fell dead from mortification — just fatally humiliated by your 
cowardly conduct!" 

The experience of an expeditionary force was told, which, cut 
off from supplies for a few days by a threatening cavalry force 
of the enemy, reached a severe condition of hunger. Finally 
the mule teams came with rations, and "Believe me," said the 
narrator, "them mules looked good to us. Their 'brays were 
bonnie' — real music to the ears of the hungry." 

"Music!" interrupted one who has very little sense of humor, 
"I'll concede they may have a good ear, but think of their raucous 
voice ! ' ' 

A Quartermaster surprised us with this statement: "I have 
had considerable experience with mules and have never known 
of a mule kicking a man and never heard of an authenticated 
instance. I know that this is against popular belief; but do any 
of you really know of such a case?" 

To the credit of this much abused useful animal, none of us 
could dispute the statement. 

The Quartermaster called in one of his muleteers who had 
driven army mules for two years, and asked him if he had ever 
been kicked. He replied: ''No, sir, I never been reached; but 
have seen 'em kick where I jest recently wus!" 

The final mule story was something like this: Out at a western 
frontier military post, an officer conceived the idea that mountain 
howitzers might be effectively used in fighting Indians, by dis- 
pensing with their carriages and strapping the guns on the backs 
of mules. The Indians had much fear of artillery. — the very sight 

and sound of "big guns" demoralized them — so, while these 

i 

! 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 157 

howitzers were essential, it was difficult to manage their carriages 
on mountain trails, and the officer was encouraged to experiment. 
He dismounted a small howitzer and strapped it to the padded 
back of an ancient and docile mule, the muzzle towards the mule's 
tail, the gun loaded with ball. The officers and men of the garrison 
were out in full force to witness the demonstration. The mule 
was led to the bank of the river in the middle of which a target 
had been set up on an anchored raft. The loaded animal with the 
loaded gun was gently backed to the edge of the river bank and the 
gun was carefully sighted for the target by the officer in charge 
of the affair. He inserted a time-fuse, lighted it and joined the 
spectators who were standing around in a semicircle with calm 
dignity and serious expectancy. 

In a moment or so the hitherto sedate mule, hearing the sizzling 
of the fuse, began working his ears, reached his head around to 
see what was going on and, discovering it, suddenly gathered 
his legs in a bunch, laid back his ears and began making several 
revolutions a minute — the howitzer threatening death to every 
living thing within a half-mile radius. 

The mule's sudden activity was fearfully contagious! The 
Major in command of the Post tried to climb a tree; some threw 
themselves on the ground, some ran, some, rushing to the river, 
jumped in, some were scared to a "standstill,'' and there were 
audible groans and fright exclamations. 

Then came a puff of smoke and a bang! The mule went over 
the bluff into the river and, anchored to the bottom by the gun, 
perished in the service. The shot struck the adobe chimney of 
the commandant's quarters and the proposed innovation of 
"Mule Artillery'' had no backers. 

One of our muleteers says: "Whoever says mules are easy to 
git along with is a liar, that is, providin' he has an intimate ac- 
quaintance with 'em; and as for stoppin' the use of swear words 
in handlin' 'em, it ain't fair to a mule with an army experience 
to begin learnin' him polite synonyms." 

October 2S. A tedious march last night to our right brought 
us to the Williamsburg road at or near Seven Pines. Other troops 
arrived later. It appears that our Corps is represented here by 
two divisions, Marston's (ours) and Pleckman's, Weitzel com- 
manding both. 

October 20. Yesterday our Brigade, Colonel Cullen in command, 
was formed on the right of the Williamsburg Road, in advance, 
with the 1st and 3d Brigades held in reserve. We advanced 
to the attack of the enemy's entrenched line over open ground 



158 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

at about half past three p.m., preceded by a line of skirmishers. 
We entered a ravine close up to the enemy's works and under fire. 
We saw that the enemy in our front was in force and being rapidly 
reinforced, and we sent back for reserves, but none came. It was 
plain enough that we were outnumbered, and finally the confident 
enemy came out of his works on our flanks and by an enfilading 
fire promised our destruction or capture. 

Word was given for every man to act for himself and a large num- 
ber began a sudden and rapid retreat, while many others, deciding 
not to risk the fire, remained to surrender. In trying to escape, 
many were killed or wounded. Lieutenant Colonel Moffit of the 
96th was badly wounded (leg amputated) and begged to be helped 
off, or that some friend kill him, for he had been a prisoner once 
and would rather die than repeat his experience. He was helped 
to escape, but one or two of his helpers were killed. 

When at a safe distance we could see many of our men and 
officers surrendering; but they could not be blamed, for the risk 
of getting away, which so many took, looked like death. The 
5th Maryland, 10th New Hampshire and 96th Xew York lost 
their colors, those of the 118th being saved by our tall color- 
bearer, Jo. Hastings, who ran with them as fast as his long legs 
could carrv him. His running; was a brave act, all the same, for 
he was the target of many rifles. 

Note. Hastings was nearly 6 feet 6 in height, carried our colors all through, 
the war and was a modest and brave man. Because he was unusually tall, we 
claimed that we carried our colors higher than other regiments. 

The brigade on our left was also repulsed and three of its regi- 
ments lost their colors. 

It was a big blunder to send such a v small force against strong, 
well-occupied entrenchments without using our reserves. The 
explanation is that it was believed that this part of the enemy's 
line was thinly held. 

Lieutenant William Forbes of Company C was killed and four 
others of our officers are missing, prisoners, we suppose, although 
we know that Lieutenant Dickinson was seriously wounded by 
grapeshot, or shrapnel. Our casualties, killed, wounded and 
missing, are 111, quite serious for one small remnant of a regiment. 
Officers missing are Lieutenants Dickinson, Bryant, Saunders, 
Potter and O'Connor. 

October SO. The whole movement of day before yesterday upon 
the enemy's left, of which we were but a part, was a disastrous 
failure, with the loss of a few guns and a large number of men 
killed, wounded and prisoners. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT - 159 

Soon after dark last night we withdrew to the Charles City 
Road, rain, darkness and mud making the march very slow and 
fatiguing. It was an all-night tramp. To-night we are back in 
the works near Fort Burnham. 

As the battle of the 28th was near where the bloody battle of 
Fair Oaks was fought in 1862, the engagement will be called 
"Second Fair Oaks." 



REGIMENTAL CASUALTIES AT SECOND FAIR OAKS 

October 27-28, 1864 

1 Captured and afterwards exchanged or paroled. 

2 Captured and not heard of or from up to our muster-out 

of service. Supposed to have died in prison. 

This list is only partial; unable to get a complete record. 

Killed: William Forbes, Company C, commissioned Second 
Lieutenant, but not mustered as such. 

Wounded: Company A, Captain Joseph R. Seaman, Joseph 
Terry; Company B, John Cassavaugh, Richard Dugan. Oliver 
H. Moore, Albert Parker; Company I, Lieutenant M. V. B. 
Stetson. 

Missing — Captured 

Some of the captured were probably also wounded. 

Company A: Lieutenant George A. Potter, 1 Adolphus Gyatt, 1 
Henry L. Hall,- William E. Hall, 2 John Harper.- George W. 
Perrigo, 2 Janurieus Suprenant (died in prison), William Thayer, 1 
James Van Wagoner. 2 

Company B: Walter J. Dillenbach, 1 Emerson S. Drown, 2 
Samuel C. Emery, 1 Henry W. Ford, 2 Elijah P. Mauley, 1 Joseph 
Murray, 2 George W. Muzzy, 1 Anselm V. Parsons, 1 Seth W. Par- 
sons, 1 Stephen C. Bull, 2 Howland R. Davis. 2 

Company C: Lieutenant Luther S. Bryant, 1 William M. Gas- 
kill, 1 Harvey Randall. 2 

Company D: Lorenzo J. Barton (died in prison), Edmond 
Eldridgo, 2 Horace P. May, 1 James Murphy, 1 George Sturges. 1 

Company E: George II. Bailey (died in prison), Daniel H. 
Dupuis (died in prison), John W. Lamb, 1 William Montgomery, 2 
Sir William Wallace, 1 Charles S. Wright (died in prison). 

Company F: William W. Ariel, 1 Harvey D. Bronson, 1 Barnett 
Crowningshk'Id, 1 Eugene Dupuis, 1 John Flynn, 2 Frederick J. 
Hinckley, 1 Warren Monty, 1 Oscar D. Morehouse, 2 Sergeant 






160 THREE YEARS WITH THE 



Edward 0. Welch, 1 Lafayette Mason, 1 John Tyrell (died in prison, 
January 28, 1865). 

Company G: Lieutenant M. N. Dickinson 1 (severely 
wounded), George W. Fisher (died in prison), William Freebern, 1 
Lafayette Mason, 1 Samuel Maxim (died in prison), Benjamin B. 
Perry, 2 Deliss Rist, 2 Thomas H. Tripp, 2 James Tucker. 1 Alfred E. 
Wakefield (died in prison), William B. Chamberlain (died in 
prison). 

Company H: Lieutenant Frank Saunders, 1 Peter Burke, 1 
Godfrey Molburn. 1 

Company I: Lieutenant Daniel A. O'Connor, 1 Solomon Ash- 
line, 1 Henry Douglass, 2 Frederick Evans, 2 Charles Fifield, 2 George 
A. Fifield, 1 Henry Gonyo, 2 John Kelley, 1 Matthew McCrum, 1 
Frederick W. Nightingale, 2 John EL Roberts, 2 Myron H. Slosson. 1 

doMPANY K: No record. 






October 31. Have advices that our Colonel, Keese, who has 
been absent on sick-leave for some time, has resigned. 

To-day our Brigade moved to the woods in rear of our place 
in the trenches. Hope we will get some rest. 

November 8. Have been resting in the woods 'till this morning 
when we are ordered to Aiken's Landing. We suppose we are 
to take transports for New York for riot service — riots arising 
from the draft. 

November 4- Orders countermanded and- we were hurried to 
Deep Bottom to meet an expected attack. 

I was amused last night in listening to the conversation or dis- 
cussion by a group of men. The one who did most of the talking 
was defending his belief that even men brave of heart might have 
"discreet" legs; legs that just naturally wouldn't "stand" for 
danger. "Why," he said, "the best of us have, at times, felt 
brave above and trembly reluctant below our belts. Now, this 
with some folks amounts to the legs being 'boss' and running the 
whole body off the field in spite of the will to stay" - — this and 
much else. 

Finally a new voice joined in, saying: "Guess that idee is all 
right. 1 knew a darned good soldier who had that trouble. His 
laigs always disgraced him in battle. At Cold Harbor he managed 
to control them laigs of his the fust day, but on the second day 
both his laigs got shot off, and, while it's hard to believe, they do 
sav that just as soon as them laigs got loose they ran right off the 
field!" 

The laughter which followed seemed to end the discussion. 




Captain 
JOHN S. STONE 



~ r W 




Captain 
CHARLES W. WELLS 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 1G1 

Note. It is reported of President Lincoln that he pardoned many soldier- 
boys found guilty of cowardice in battle, and that he had a file for papers 
in these instances labeled "Leg Cases," explaining that refractory legs were 
to blame. 

It is said of General Sherman that a corps commander complained that 
he had trouble in the enforcement of army discipline because of the necessity 
of sending findings of court martial to President Lincoln for approval in 
capital cases, for he wouldn't approve death sentence?. 

General Sherman replied: "I have no such trouble — I shoot them first!" 

November 7. Still at Deep Bottom, but no attack of conse- 
quence has materialized. 

November 8 to 30. During these days we have been moved 
about somewhat. Had a couple of small skirmishes and commenced 
preparing a winter camp just behind our fortifications near Fort 
Burnham. It is evident that no considerable movement will be 
undertaken until spring. Our Regiment has very few officers left, 
but this shortage will soon be supplied by promotions. So far 
we have had but three officers commissioned to our Regiment 
from ''outside 7 ' — all others have been promotions of our own 
officers and men. 

In thinking over the events of the year it seems a fact that our 
most important and influential victory was that of President 
Lincoln's reelection — a victorious battle of ballots. 

Its splendid evidence of a much united North was a dampening 
" discourager''' of what appears to be about the last hope of the 
Confederacy — that of help from the peace-crazy anti-war "bleat- 
ings" of our worse than pacifists, which the Confederate Commis- 
sioners in Canada and their propagandists in the North have 
tried to organize into overt sedition. Willi this too abundant, 
"material," there was exaggerated expectation of success. 

Mr. Lincoln's triumphant reelection was a sure "knock out" 
of the enemy's belief that the smoldering disloyalty north of 
the line could be fanned into a back-firing blaze — but talking 
and fighting are decidedly different things. 

Sometime we are likely to learn how thoroughly the South has 
organized efforts to influence sympathy in the North and to seduce 
such sympathy into open insurrection. 

December 2. Major General Ord has recovered from his wound 
and is back in command of our Corps. 

Last night some of our men were discussing the comparative 
advantages of the infantry and cavalry branches of the service. 
Some thought the added care of horses was against cavalrymen, 
and others thought that that was made up by having horses to 
ride on the march. 

One spoke up, rather emphatically, "The infantry for me. 



162 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

How the divil could I have got away at Fair Oaks the other day 
if I had had a horse to look after. When retreat comes I don't 
want to be bothered with no horse/'' and he walked away, not 
waiting for obvious comment. 

December 3. Received my commission as Major with rank 
from September 16. 

December J. Assistant Surgeon Porteous, having been promoted 
to be Surgeon of the 46th New York, was to-day presented with 
sword, sash and belt by his fellow officers of our Regiment in 
token of our regard and appreciation. Have moved camp to 
near the New Market Road. 

December 10. The enemy made a reconnoissance in force on 
our right and front this morning, driving in our pickets; but it 
was repulsed. It was quite a lively "scrimmage," evidently to 
ascertain our strength. 

December 1.2. It is claimed that "Butler's Canal" at Dutch 
Gap is nearly finished and that our gunboats can soon go through 
and thus avoid the sunken obstructions at Trent's Reach. While 
the canal has been dug under great difficulties and danger, costing 
many lives, there are doubts of its military value. 

January 1, 1865. In the reorganization of our Army the 
designations of the 10th and ISth Corps are discontinued. All 
the white troops of the Army of the James are now organized as 
the 24th Corps and the colored troops as the 25th Corps. Our 
regiment is now in the Second Brigade, Third Division, 24th 
Corps, Major General John Gibbon commanding. Of the nine 
brigades in this corps none is commanded by an officer of higher 
rank than Colonel. Our Division is commanded by Brigadier 
General Charles Devens and our Brigade by Colonel Donohue, 
10th New Hampshire. 

This is a bright and cold New Year's Day. "Our Hogan" has 
had charge of the officers' "mess*' of our Regiment for a long time 
and in the main has been quite a success. We provided him 
money for a turkey dinner to-night. He procured four fine turkeys 
at $7.00 per, and as roasting facilities are scant, he roasted them 
separately yesterday to be warmed up for our dinner to-night. 
He made the alarming announcement this morning that the roasted 
turkeys had been stolen from the mess tent during the night! 
Under the grill of "third degree'' questioning and from circum- 
stantial evidence it appeared, quite conclusively, that he had 
sold the turkeys to the officers of another regiment at a tempting 
price. The purchasers, evidently, not only wanted the turkeys 
but desired to "beat" us out of our turkey dinner, as a good joke. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 163 

Hogan was told that if he did not provide turkeys for our dinner, 
he would lose his place and be put back into the ranks. He at 
once started for Aiken's Landing, where such supplies might 
possibly be found, and by noon he returned with the " birds." 
It was nearly nine o'clock p.m. before our dinner was read}-; 
but we were more than ready and had such a fine feast and Hogan 
had worked so hard, that we forgave him his fault as we had often 
done before. 

We could get but three who were willing to carve, but seeing 
how easily and nicely it was being done by these three, one of 
our Captains volunteered to try the fourth bird himself. He 
strained so hard with his opposed knife and fork, put so much 
muscle and little skill into his efforts to dismember his ''turk" 
that it slipped from his hold and went half the length of our im- 
provised table, upsetting things in its way and splashing gravy 
and other liquids over some of us. The episode occasioned much 
amusement, especially when the bungling carver claimed that it 
was "the toughest turkey he ever carved," proving the statement 
by admitting, what was evident, that it was his first experience. 

We had nothing stronger than coffee, but with songs and stories 
and brief speeches a condition of felicity was reached that might 
be credited to the use of a more exhilarating beverage — and yet 
shotted hostile guns, close by, were " looking" at us! 

A few nights ago we were discussing at headquarters the " State 
of the Nation," as any one has the right to do. We were agreed 
in the opinion that the war was practically decided; that the 
Confederacy and its militant forces were beaten to a "frazzle" 
and that further sacrifice of life, while likely to be large, would be 
wicked wastefulness. We believed that the South was confiding 
in the belief that "while there is life there is hope" without having 
either of the essentials — life or hope; that the reelection of 
Lincoln ended expectation of any helpful division of Northern 
sentiment, etc. 

We had the encouragement of seriously believing that these 
things are true and hoped we might be spared to see them proved. 

Januarys. Am brigade officer of the day; my first brigade 
detail as Major. After my promotion I had to buy a horse and 
equipment. Cavalry officers are apt to have extra horses, so I 
started for the camp of the First Mounted Rifles and on the way 
met one of its Majors on a good-looking horse. 1 told him what 
1 wms after and he said he had three horses and 1 could take my 
choice for S150. I thought he would probably bo riding his best 
one and replied that I would take the one he was riding if he 



164 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

would take my promise to pay till the paymaster arrived, and 
the purchase was made. 

Note. The animal proved in every way all right; six years old and never 
harnessed; easy gaited, strong and without nerves, nothing seemed to frighten 
or startle him. I brought him home and sold him for .$375 — the only horse 
deal of my life. 

January 4- Our new camp is becoming quite comfortable. 
About 8.000 troops, including some from our division, left to-day 
under General Terry. We suppose it is a force to cooperate with 
the Navy in another attempt at Fort Fisher at the entrance to 
Cape Fear River. If the enemy finds out about this withdrawal 
he may "try" us, so we are ordered to be vigilant and to ''man" 
the fortifications every morning from 4 o'clock till sunrise. 

General Butler has issued a long congratulatory order in which 
our regiment and some of its officers and men have honorable 
mention. 

January 10. Heavy rain with thunder and lightning. Mud 
everywhere — deep and sticky. Picket firing last night kept us 
in the fortifications from midnight until daylight. General Butler 
has been relieved from command of the Department of Virginia 
and North Carolina, being succeeded by General Ord. 

January 11-19. Routine camp life; drilling, dress parades, 
a few alarms, some picket firing — quite comfortable considering 
the proximity of the enemy and the mud ■ — much mud, deep mud ! 

I have been noting for sometime the visible "'ripening" of our 
boys. Of course their youthful spirit continues, for our Regiment 
yet consists of young men. I suppose that the average age at 
enlistment was below twenty-two. 

What I mean is, the frivolous nonsense and thoughtlessness of 
"just boys'' has dwindled and there is growth in maturity after 
the manner of older men. The picnic idea of soldiering which 
characterized our earlier service has changed to considering it a 
serious business with a serious purpose. This aging process has 
been more rapid than it would have been in civil life; not so much 
in a physical sense — for we are stronger, more able to endure 
because of our training and experience — but in sober-mindedness 
and judgment. By the same token our men are more efficient, 
have more per capita value as soldiers, than even one year ago. 

The impulsiveness of raw, untrained and inexperienced soldiers 
is good, but the sober steadfastness of matured and trained men 
is better; and so it is, that while our Regiment is hugely reduced 
in numbers, it is in no wise proportionally lessened in service 
efficiency. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 165 

One of our men, the same who found his missing gloves on his 
hands when he washed them (at Fort Ethan Allen), has his dis- 
charge. At Fort Harrison he was wounded by an exploding shell, 
losing an eye and receiving a severe cut across the palm of his 
hand. He returned from hospital for duty, but claimed that two 
fingers of his wounded hand were doubled down and stiff on the 
palm so that he couldn't handle his gun or do much of any work 
around camp. While a good fighter, -he was rather slovenly and 
shiftless, and we urged him to take his discharge and go home. 
He insisted that he had enlisted for three years, or during the war, 
and he would "stick." 

Later on, however, a couple of his comrades going home on 
furlough influenced him to take his discharge. He came to say 
good-by, and holding out his crippled hand, said, "I'm going to 
hold my fingers stiff on the palm of my hand till I get a pension 
and then Fm going to straighten them out like that! " and he 
straightened out his fingers quite naturally. He had been " faking " 
their uselessness to get rid of drill and camp duty, but his loss of 
an eye entitled him to a discharge and we condoned his deceit 
as to his alleged minor disability. 

January 20. Received this morning " Special Order No. 19, 
Headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina and 
Army of the James.'' dated yesterday, appointing me Provost 
Marshal of the City of Portsmouth, Va., ordering me to report 
to Major General Ord at Fortress Monroe — a pleasant surprise. 

January 21-22. Busy making calls and bidding good-by. 
At Division Headquarters (General Devens) was told that I was 
being considered for appointment on the Division stall, but was 
advised that my appointment was more important, especially 
as there was no prospect of army activity. 

January 23. Cold and rainy. Left camp, with some regret, 
for Aiken's Landing, with horse, baggage and servant, taking 
steamer for City Point; from there by mail steamer fur Fortress 
Monroe, reaching there in the early evening. Reported at once 
to the Provost Marshal General, Lieutenant Colonel Caughlin. 
Later called on Major General Ord, Department Commander, 
his brother Major Ord, of the staff, and Captain Gilchrist, Provost 
Marshal, for whom I took a "right-away" liking.* 

January 2. f +. This morning General Ord asks me to spend a 
few days on a commission of three officers to inspect the prisons 
and investigate the prisoners in the Department. 

* This beginning of acquaintance with Captain Gilchrist has been continued, 
intermittently, ever since. He is a lawyer and, going West alter the war, 
attained judicial honors at Evansville, Indiana'. 



166 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

January 25. Left this morning; with the Prison Commission 
by an army tug, the Francis King, which is assigned for our use. 
stopping first at Norfolk. Called on General Shepley, command- 
ing that District, and Colonel Mann, Provost Marshal of the city, 
and proceeded to business. 

We found most of the prisons dirty and crowded, and, worse, 
found many prisoners, soldiers and civilians against whom there 
were no charges of record — probably arrested and forgotten. 
Others were being held on such trivial charges as to have been 
expiated by their time of imprisonment. We found a few women 
prisoners, they being well cared for, but arrested mostly on sus- 
picion of furnishing information or aid to the enemy. 

Our report recommended reform in the case of the prisons and 
a wholesale release of prisoners, and our recommendations were 
approved. 

Because of frequent letters received from our Regiment and the 
use of a diary kept by Quartermaster Northup, I am able to con- 
tinue a memorandum of the experience of the USth in the field. 

January 24, 186-5. The enemy opened with a considerable 
artillery fire this morning. Later the rebel gunboats, Richmond, 
Fredericksburg and Drury, came down the James past Fort Brady, 
firing on our works and being fired upon by us. They evidently 
counted upon higher water from recent rains than was found in 
the James, for one of them ran aground and the Drury blew up. 
Our Monitor and gunboats distantly participated in the action 
and there was much thunder of guns. The enemy had evidently 
learned of the withdrawal of some of our troops and planned an 
attack subject to the success of their gunboats; that being a 
failure no land attack was seriously undertaken. 

January 25 to March 16. Only routine of winter camp life and 
duty, but constantly alert and actively watchful because of the 
enemy's nearness; also had two or three changes of camp location. 

March 17. Our Corps reviewed by General Grant and Secretary 
of War Stanton, which is thought significant of things to come. 

March 18. Doing something to-day to celebrate St. Patrick's 
Day, interfered with yesterday by the review. 

March 20. Hot for time of year, reaching 95 degrees. 

March 24- Senator "'Jim" Nye in cam]), visiting General Ord. 

March 26. President Lincoln and a large party came from City 
Point to our headquarters and occasioned much interest. Our 
tall President with his "stove-pipe" hat was conspicuous, especially 
on horseback. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 107 

March 27-2S. Unusual stir and activity are noticeable about 
Army and Corps headquarters. Generals, staff officers and order- 
lies are galloping here and there. General Ord with a large pari 
of the Army of the James is with General Meade south and wesl of 
Petersburg, and General Weitzel is commanding what is left 
of us here. It is much talked in camp that there is something 
important pending. 

March 30. Heavy artillery fire, near and distant, all last night. 

April 2. Sunday. Great news, from Grant of successful opera- 
tions on our left — west of Petersburg. 

April 3. Heard heavy explosions early this morning and soon 
knew that the Confederates had blown up their gunboats on the 
James, which clearly indicated that Richmond is being abandoned. 
AYe were promptly on the march. Major General AVeitzel command- 
ing, our Division (General Devens) and the First Division of 
our Corps leading towards Richmond. We found the enemy's 
works in our front abandoned and all we feared were possible 
bombs and mines planted along the way. Near Richmond 
a carriage approached, the occupants waving handkerchiefs as 
flags of truce. The Mayor of Richmond and a party of citizens 
were meeting us to surrender the city, but the formal surrender 
and raising of "Old Glory" on the capitol occurred later in the 
day. Fortune favored us with being the first organized Federal 
troops to enter the long desired Confederate capital! 

The city was burning and disorder, consternation and alarm 
prevailed. Our troops began fighting the fire, tried to stop the 
looting and did their best to restore order and to calm the frenzied 
citizens. All was so pitiful that it dampened the thrill of victory. 

April 4- President Lincoln came to Richmond to-day followed 
about the city by crowds. The negroes are frantically pressing 
around him and shouting all sorts of prayers and blessings. 

The city is becoming more orderly and citizens' fear has quite 
subsided. 

April 5-8. Our Regiment is camped outside of Manchester 
and our Colonel Nichols commands the Brigade. 

April 9. Have news of Lee's surrender, and rejoicing is a 
distinct feature of our camp. Can hardly realize the glorious fact 
that the war is practically ended. Our homes loom up in our 
vision of the immediate future with delightful anticipation. 

April K)-14. We are doing all sorts of work, mostly provost 
duty in Manchester and Richmond: guarding property, preserving 
order, etc. 

April 15. Have our first news of the assassination of President 



168 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Lincoln, and it brings a sense of bereavement to every one of us — 
to all of us a personal sorrow. Can it be that this great and good 
man whom we so recently saw in Richmond; this head of a great 
nation reunited under his administration; this Commander-in- 
Chief of our victorious Army and Navy — that just as he had 
glimpsed the dawn of peace for which he had prayed and patiently 
wrought and all through the years expected — can it be that he 
has been assassinated? This sad news awfully discounts our 
rejoicing over other recent events. 

April 17 to June 12. For nearly two months we have been in 
Richmond and its vicinity, doing the things hero tof ore men- 
tioned; but the time has dragged because of our anxiety to get 
home. General ITalleck has taken General Ord's place in command 
of the Department of Virginia with headquarters in Richmond. 

April 27. News of General Johnston's surrender. was received 
with vociferous demonstrations of joy that the war was surely 
ended. May 26th Governor Pierpont, Civil Governor of Virginia, 
arrived in Richmond and met with a fine reception. Every few 
days there were rumors of our starting for home with their quota 
of delight. 

June 13. Now have actual orders for "homeward bound. " 
The orders covering muster-out, included complimentary mention 
of our Regiment's service and the giving to each man, when honor- 
ably discharged, his Spencer rifle. The rifles will be much appreci- 
ated as a token of recognized service and as a souvenir of the war. 

Our recruits, enlistment unexpired, are to be turned over to 
the 96th New York, which will remain in service, the term of its 
reenlistment not having expired. 

June 14. Embarked with the 9th Vermont on board transport 
Thomas A. Morgan and arrived at Fortress Monroe the next 
morning. I joined the regiment here. 

June Id. Took transport Prince Albert at Fortress Monroe for 
Baltimore. 

June 16. Arrived in Baltimore at 7.30 a.m. after a rather 
rough passage. Back again after nearly three years to the city 
where we first received our arms — and some abuse. 

Left Baltimore at 11 a.m. for Philadelphia, where we were 
provided with an excellent dinner at the "'Cooper Shop/' just as 
every soldier passing through that city has been favored all through 
the war. We gave three hearty cheers lor Philadelphia and its 
hospitality. We marehed to the Delaware River, crossed by ferry 
and, after some delay, took train at Camden lor New York. 

June 17. Arrived in Jersey City at 1.30 a.m. Crossed to New 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 1G0 

York by ferry and marched through the sleeping city to the 
rooms of the Howard Association where we slept on the floors 
and were provided with indifferent meals. 

The morning papers have mentions of our arrival, a brief 
history of the regiment and of its marching down Broadway in 
September, 1862, numbering about 1,100; of its receiving recruits 
and now having only about 300 men. Mention was also made of 
the order giving each man his Spencer rifle and that we were the 
first organized Union troops to enter Richmond. 

Early in the day we were besieged by men and women, curious 
to see us and anxious to secure war souvenirs. Some of our men 
found a place where imitation Confederate currency was sold 
and they bought it, selling it. again to these souvenir-hunters at a 
big profit as having been captured in Richmond. Our men also 
took such coins as they might have or could get and, heating 
them to give the appearance of going through fire, sold them at 
a "fat" price as having been found in the fire-ruins of Richmond. 
Worse yet, some sold their rifles; but as they were not to be given 
until "honorably discharged," they were still government property 
and, of course, not allowed by the guards to be taken out of the 
building, and the purchasers were even liable to arrest for having 
government property in their possession, None of these rifles 
went out of the building, nor could the purchasers identify the 
soldiers from whom the}' bought. This is not mentioned in honor 
of the few soldiers involved, but as evidence thai some soldiers 
did not let ethics interfere in trying to supply what citizens eagerly 
wanted and would pay for. 

In the late afternoon we marched down Broadway to t he- 
Battery and took the transport Argonaut for Albany. In our old 
tattered and faded uniform and shabby accouterments and with 
such a pitiful remnant of a regiment, we made a forlorn appearance 
and were gazed at and sympathized with by cheering crowds 
along our route. Many were in tears, very likely because reminded 
of some soldier friend or relative who would never return. 

Passing City Hall Park recalled our stay there nearly three 
years before on our way to the front and the show our full 
regiment then made as we marched over the same ground, and 
we remembered the wild enthusiasm of the people at that time. 

June IS. Sunday. Reached Albany about 10 a.m. and all 
Albany seemed to be packed in Steamboat Soma re and its vicinity. 
We were saluted with artillery and with continuous cheers. As 
a dinner was arranged for our Regiment we lauded, and the 9th 
Vermont, which came up with us on the Argonaut, went on to 



170 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Troy. This dinner was given largely through the influence of Mrs. 
Mary Pruyn, mother of our late Major, and was a fine feast. 
Colonel Nichols and myself called on Mrs. Pruyn. The day, so 
happy for us, was a sorrowful one for her. and yet her beautiful 
Christian spirit abounded and she plainly manifested her pleasure 
in meeting the friends and comrades of her "dear Charley." 

In the afternoon we left for Troy and there rejoining the 9th 
Vermont, entrained for Whitehall. At Saratoga Springs the old 
United States Hotel was burning and we were besought to let 
our men help fight the fire. We did not dare let our men "loose," 
for, in their hilarious coming-home excitement, we could not tell 
what might happen — so we ordered our train to shorten its stop. 

Arriving at the steamboat landing at Whitehall we found the 
steamer United States waiting to take us to Piatt sburgh. We much 
wished to reach Plattsburgh by daylight and made all the delays 
in embarking that we could, much to the irritation of the steamer's 
Captain Anderson. The steamer's hands commenced carrying 
our two or three car-loads of baggage on board and, although 
it was our duty to do this, we willingly let them continue without 
our help. 

At Whitehall we separated from the 9th Vermont, that regiment 
going to Rutland, and we parted with these good friends and 
comrades. 

June 19. In spite of our trying to hinder departure from 
Whitehall last night, we left earlier than we wished and reached 
Plattsburgh before daylight this morning. The town was in dark- 
ness, but we found Hon. Smith M. Weed and Hon. G. W. Palmer 
on the wharf waiting for us. When the last man was off the 
steamer, Captain Anderson loudly declared his thankfulness, 
saying he had been in terror of his life all night. Somehow the 
independent conduct of our men got on his nerves and he must 
have counted their playful inquiries whether "he could swim," 
etc., as threats. 

Led by our appreciated reception committee of two we silently 
marched to the Old U. S. Barracks where we had gathered three 
years before and felt almost home again. 

During the day hundreds visited the Barracks, not only Platts- 
burgh citizens, but our friends from far and near. We kept up the 
routine of camp duty, guard mounting, dress parade, etc. 

June 22. A reception was tendered the regiment by citizens 
of Plattsburgh with a dinner at the Fouquet House. In the early 
evening we marched to the Milage Square and were addressed by 
Hon. Orlando Kellogg and Hon. George W. Palmer, Hon. Smith 



ADIRONDACK KEGLMENT 171 

M. Weed presiding, and then to the hotel for dinner, which was 
an enjoyable affair. 

Mr. Kellogg in his Village Square speech set a trap for us. Me 
said, in substance: "Boys, the war is over, the Union is saved 
and for one I'm in favor of forgiving and pardoning even those 
most guilty in causing and continuing the war — " Mere lie 
was interrupted by distinct manifestations of dissent, for it was 
too early for all of us to forget the tearful cost of the war and the 
crime of rebellion. Mr. Kellogg permitted the expressions of 
disapproval to dwindle, when he continued: " You interrupted me. 
Yes, I favor forgiveness and pardon of all Confederates high and 
low — except those who are hung, or otherwise punished!" and 
this was greeted by applause and laughter. 

After dinner and the post-prandial talks our men in command of 
sergeants returned to the Barracks, the officers remaining to 
enjoy a pleasant social time, and all went "merry as a marriage 
bell" until after midnight. 

We had with us at dinner some of our badly wounded officers 
who preceded us home — Captain Parmerter who lost a leg at 
Cold Harbor; Captain Ransom and Adjutant Carter, each losing 
an arm at Drury's Bluff, the latter also taken prisoner. 

The following is from a Piatt sburgh paper giving an account 
of our Regiment's reception: 

Honors to the 118th. The circumstances under which the Regiment 
arrived, the time being three o'clock in the morning following the Sabbath, 
rendered it all but impossible to do justice promptly at the time. Conse- 
quently Thursday evening was set apart for that purpose, and a supper was 
given the officers and men at Fouquet's Hotel. We believe the whole thing 
was arranged and carried out satisfactorily, citizens and soldiers enjoying 
it equally well. 

At half past six the regiment, escorted by the Veteran Reserves stationed 
at this place, marched from the Barracks through our streets bearing their 
arms and the tattered flags that attested the numerous battles in which they 
had engaged. The men made a fine appearance and maintained that even 
tread that discipline alone ensures. They were halted on the Square and 
drawn up in line to listen to addresses. 

The Chairman, Hon. S. M. Weed, introduced as the first speaker, Hon. 0. 
Kellogg, Member of Congress from this District, who made an excellent and 
appropriate speech from Trinity Church steps, welcoming the veterans home 
to their relatives and friends. His address was listened to by two or three 
thousand persons, and was received with frequent applause. 

The Chairman then introduced ex-Congressman, Hon. G. W. Palmer, 
who, for about half an hour interested the audience with pertinent remarks. 

Three cheers having been given for the USth, the Veteran Reserves, the 
"Old Sixteenth," etc., the Regiment took up their march for Fouquet's which 



172 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

they reached just in time to find the tables in readiness for thorn. Three 
parallel tables were set the whole length of the dining-room and a table on 
the eastern piazza extending the whole length of the house. 

The supper having been disposed of, the sentiments of the evening were 
introduced by the Chairman, Hon. S. M. Weed: 

1. The surviving officers and men of the USth N. Y. V. 

This was appropriately responded to by Hon. G. M. Beckwith, and Colonel 
Nichols, commanding the Regiment. Colonel Nichols offered the following: 

2. The Ladies. 

Responded to by Hon. G. W. Palmer. 

3. The memory of the dead of the War of the Great Rebellion. 

In response to this, appropriate remarks were offered by Rev. Mr. Bulkier > 
and Chaplain Hagar, of the USth. 

4. The Veteran Reserves of the Army.. 

Responded to briefly by Captain Wiliauer, in command of the U. S. Veterans 
doing duty at the Barracks, and Captain B. M. Beekwith, late of the army 
in the West. 

5. The Union, now for a fact, one and indivisible. 

In response to this sentiment Mr. McMasters in the course of his remarks 
said: "Yes, we are one and indivisible, with our boundaries east by the At- 
lantic, west by the Pacific, south by the Gulf of Mexico, and north, at present, 
by Canada." This brought down the house, the soldiers especially. Major 
Cunningham also spoke eloquently in response to this sentiment and offered: 

6. The wounded and disabled officers and men of the UStli N. Y. V. 

7. The President of the United States. 

Mr. Kellogg responded to both sentiments. He alluded to the great re- 
sponsibility, of dictating a course towards those lately in arms against the 
government. He hardly knew how to name a course to be pursued towards 
them, and in the great matter of reconstruction. 

S. The Army and Navy. 

Responded to by Lieutenant Colonel Dominy. 

9. The Veteran Pittsburgh "Boys." 

Colonel Palmer, of the late lOth N. Y. Vols., responded appropriately. 

There might be added much by way of incident and otherwise to lengthen 
out this report. We cannot forbear alluding to the presentation of bouquets 
to some of the officers. Captain Ransom, having left an arm at Drury's 
Bluff, had introduced to him Miss Jennie Morgan and Miss Helen Wood- 
ward by Captain William Bailey. The ladies modestly made presentation 
to the gallant Captain, who blushingly received it. Captain Parmerter was 
the next recipient. He lost a leg at Cold Harbor, and we could but notice 
his uneasiness at the vague suspicion he had of what was coming as the ladies 
passed around to his side of the table. 

Thus far all was very well. Captains Ransom and Parmerter are married. 
But we watched the course of the ladies, and found their bearing was due 
east towards the head of the table, where sat Major Cunningham, the pride 
of his Regiment, and honored by all. The bouquet proffered him was received 
with modest v characteristic o^ a young and brave officer. As the Major 




Captain 
DENNIS STONE 




Captaix 
HENRY J. ADAMS 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 173 

had just made a telling speech, nothing at this critical period in his history 
was to be said except graciously expressed thanks. 

The exercises at the table having been concluded, we retired, but we learn 
that others followed to the sound of gay and festive music, and that the small 
hours found the officers engaged in practicing a step somewhat different 
from that in which they charged across the plain in front of Fort Harrison. 

June 23. Our first Colonel, Samuel T. Richards of Warrens- 
burgh, visited us and we were mighty glad to see him, but sorry 
that he is still suffering from rheumatism. 

June 20. Major Lupton, Army Paymaster, is here with our 
muster-out documents and commenced paying us off and making 
an end of the " Adirondack Regiment." 

Our sutler, who usually "secured" the privilege of sitting 
with the Paymaster when we were paid off and having this "in- 
fluence" in collecting the sutler's accounts from the men, failed 
to get any help from Major Lupton and "Mr. Sutler" had to 
sit outside. So it was, that many of the sutler's debtors took 
their pay and simply paid him a provokingly independent smile 
as they passed him by. 

Too many of our "boys" were so profligate in their sutler 
patronage as to always owe him, often more than their pay. 

Now, with their pay in their own hands, perhaps for the first 
time, they exercised their autonomy. Some did pay; some 
compromised, but others, believing, we suppose, that the sutler's 
previous profits on their dealings were sufficient, let it go at that. 

One of our men when paid off and discharged and thus becoming 
the citizen-owner of his rifle, said: "I'll tell you what I'm going 
to do with that gun. I*m going to take it home, stand it out in 
our backyard where the rain will rain on it and the snow will 
snow on it and every little while I'm going out and say to it. 
'Rust away goll darn you, I'm no longer obliged to keep you 
bright and shining." All the same, I believe that he kept it 
well preserved as a token of his service rather than let it rust as 
evidence of his freedom from compelled care of it. 

About as fast as paid and receiving our discharges we began 
to scatter to our homes, and it seemed like the breaking up of 
family ties, for the regiment had more of the family spirit than 
; is usual in similar organizations. It was very largely made up of 
young men, many mere boys, and this gave it life, elasticity and 
endurance, and all coming from the same geographical vicinity 
added to its social cohesion. 

We were blest with pleasant internal relations, with harmony 
and unity gratifying to ourselves and the occasion of remark 



174 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

on the part of others. There were no large or petty jealousies or 
mean ambitions to antagonize our fellowship or cripple our united 
usefulness. 

Each labored in his own degree 
How best to serve and best, agree. 

Our relations with other organizations were always pleasant 
and friendly and we had the respect of our commanders as a well- 
drilled, well-disciplined and reliable body. Many of our officers 
have been selected for staff duty and many of our men for special 
service. There was a regimental pride in the fact that we had the 
material for these special duties. 

In separating we can take each other by the hand with a mutual 
good-will which has not been impaired by our being a long time 
together in a trying service; for the powers conferred by rank and 
authority were seldom autocratically exercised. We were friends as 
soldiers and now, all on the same level in civil life, are still friends 
and all better citizens, we trust, in the consciousness of having 
rendered our country a supreme service which ought to increase 
our love for it. 

Farewell comrades of the "Adirondack Regiment" — the 
splendid USth New York Volunteers! 

By orders of the War Department we have been permitted to 
inscribe the following battles on our regimental flag: Suffolk, 
South Axxa, Swift Creek, Kingsland Creek, Drury's Bluff, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg Heights, Petersburg, Chapin's 
Farm, Fort Harrisox, Second Fair Oaks and Richmond. 

We brought back our original colors, bullet-torn, worn, ragged 
and faded, to be sent for preservation to our State Capitol with 
those of other regiments of the Empire State. 

The following is a roster of the regimental and company officers 
of the 118th Regiment when mustered out: 

FIELD AND STAFF 

Colonel. George F. Nichols; Lieutenant Colonel. Levi S. 
Domixey; Major. J. L. Cunningham; Surgeon. William L. 
Mansfield; Assistant Surgeon. John C. Preston; Adjutant. 
Clifford Hubbard; Quartermaster. H. J. Northrup; Chaplain. 
Charles Hagar. 

LINE OFFICERS 

Company A. Captain, J. R. Seaman; First Lieutenant, J. W. 
Treadway; Second Lieutenant, N. H. Arnold. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 175 

Company B. Captain, George F. Campbell; First Lieu- 
tenant, James S. Garrett (absent on detached service): Second 
Lieutenant, Melville Perry. 

Company C. Captain, C. W. Wells; First Lieutenant, L. S. 
Bryant. 

Company D. Captain, J. W. Angel; Second Lieutenant, P. 
V. N. McLean. 

Company E. Captain, II. S. Graves; First Lieutenant, 
George A. Potter; Second Lieutenant, W. F. Bidwell. 

Company F. Captain, R. W. Livingston (absent, recover- 
ing from wounds); First Lieutenant, Daniel O'Connor; Second 
Lieutenant, C. A. Grace. 

Company G. First Lieutenant, James Ii. Pitt. 

Company II. Captain, David F. Dobie; First Lieutenant, 
Frank Saunders. 

Company I. Captain, M. V. B. Stetson; First Lieutenant, 
Nelson J. Gibbs. 

Company K. Captain, John" Brydon; First Lieutenant, John 
H. Calkins; Second Lieutenant, George Vaughn. 

Quartermaster Sergeant Egbert A. Braman had been com- 
missioned Second Lieutenant, but had not been mustered-in as 
such. 

All these officers, except the Chaplain, have been promoted 
during their service, for our many casualties made many vacancies. 
Besides, several of our officers and men have been promoted to 
serve as officers in other regiments. Only ten of the above-named 
officers held commissions when the regiment went out. * 

i 

The following is a list of our officers and men who received 
brevet commissions for "meritorious service." 

From the United States 

Colonel George F. Nichols, Brevet Brigadier General, U. S. 
Volunteers. 

Major J. L. Cunningham, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. 
Volunteers. 

Captain Rowland C. Kellogg, Brevet Major, U. S. Volun- 
teers. 

Captain Charles W. Wells, Brevet Major, U. S. Volunteers. 

* At this writing, March, 1920. of the seventy-five or more commissioned 
officers, all through our regiment's three years service, so far as I know, I 
am tlu; onlv survivor! 



176 THREE YEARS WITH THE 



From the State of New York 

Captains Henry J. Adams, John Brydox, George F. 
Campbell, David F. Dobie, Patrick K. DeLaxey, Robert W. 
Livixgstox, Jacob Parmerter, James H. Pierce and Henry S. 
Ransom, Brevet Majors, New York Volunteers. 

First Lieutenants Johx L. Garter, M. Nelson Dickinson, 
James S. Garrett, Nelson J. Gibbs, Henry J. Northrup, 
George A. Potter and Johx W. Treadway, Brevet Captains, 
New York Volunteers. 

Color Sergeant Joseph A. Hastings, Brevet Second Lieu- 
tenant, New York Volunteers. 

Sergeant Cass C. La Point, Brevet Second Lieutenant, New 
York Volunteers. 

The following is a memorandum of the commands in which our 
regiment served: Middle Department, 8th Corps, from September 
4, 1862; Defenses and Department of Washington. Provisional 
Brigade, Abercrombie's Division, 22d Corps, from October 24, 
1862; District of Washington from February, 1863; Suffolk, Va., 
Reserve Brigade, 7th Corps, Department of Virginia, from April 
22, 1S63; 1st Brigade, Getty's Division, 7th Corps, from May, 
1863; Wistar's Brigade, 4th Corps, from June, 1863; Provisional 
Brigade, 7th Corps, from July, 1863; District of Yorktown, Va. ; 
from August, 1863; District of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Depart- 
ment of Virginia, from October, 1863; Newport News, Va., from 
December, 1863; Wistar's Division, 18th Corps, from January, 
1864; Heckman's Division, 18th Corps, from February, 1864; 
2d Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Corps, Army of the James, from 
April, 1864; 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 24th Corps, from December, 
1864. 

CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA OF THE SERVICE 
OF THE ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 

(118th X. Y. Vols.) 

Sept. 1, 1SC2. Left Hattsburgh, Feb. 12-Apr. 20. Camp Adiron- 

N. Y. duck, near Findley Hospi- 

2-3. In New York City. tal, north of the "Capitol, 

4. Reached Baltimore, Md. Washington. 

5-12. Camp Hall, Baltimore Apr. 20-22. En route to defense of 

& Ohio R. R., near Elk- Suffolk, Va. 

ridge. Md. 22-20. In Camp Nansemond, 

12-Oct. 23. Camp Wool, near Suffolk defenses. 

Relay House, Md. 29-Mav 1. Camp near Fort 
Oct. 24-Feb. 12, lSo:3. Camp near McClellan, Suffolk de- 
Fort Ethan Allen, \ a. fenses. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 



177 



May 1-14. Camp near Fort Union, 
Suffolk defenses. 

14-June IS. Camp near Sea- 
board and Roanoke R. R., 
Suffolk. While in this 
camp participated in the 
Blackwater Raid and de- 
struction of railroad, May 
20-26, and in reconnois- 
sance toward Petersburg, 
June 12-17. 
June 18-19. En route for Yorktown 
by railroad and transport. 

19-26. Camp at Yorktown. 

26. En route by transport to 
White House. 

26-27. Camp at White House. 

27-July 1. Beyond Pamunkey 
River in detachments, as 
advance pickets on dif- 
ferent roads. 
July 1-4. On the march with Gen. 
Dix's expedition to the 
north of Richmond; some- 
times called the ''Black- 
berry Raid." 
4. Affair at South Anna at 

night. 
5-10. On march returning to 
Yorktown. 

10-13. Camp at Yorktown. 

13-Oct. 2. Garrison at Fort 
Keyes, Gloucester Point, 
York River. 
Oct, 2-3. En route for Norfolk by 
transport. 
3. Camp Barnes, near Nor- 
folk. 

11. Companies E, G, I, and K 
detached and sent to Ports* 
mouth. 
Nov. 6. Companies C and IF joined 
the Portsmouth detach- 
ment; regimental head- 
quarters moved there, and 
companies A, B, D, and F 
went into the "Intrenched 
Camp" about two miles 
from Norfolk. 

14-Dec. 12. Whole regiment 
at Portsmouth. 
Dec. 12-Jan. 21, 1864. Camp at 

Newport News. 
Jan. 21-23. On march to Williams- 
burgh. 

23-Feb. 6. Camp near Fort 
Ma^ ruder, Williamsburgh. 
Feb. 6-9. On the expedition to 



Bottom's Bridge on the 
Chicahominy. 
9-13. Camp near Union 
Cemetery, Williamsburgb. 

13-15. Marched to Newport 
News and thence by trans- 
port and railroad to Getty's 
Station. 

15-Mar. 12. In camp near 
Getty's Station, and while 
here, March 1- 9, on ex- 
pedition to Dee}) Creek, 
pursuing raiders to Bally- 
hack on the Dismal Swamp 
Canal. Part of the time 
while at this camp com- 
panies B, H, and K were 
detached at Magnolia Sta- 
tion. 
Mar. 12-Apr. 19. Camp at Bower's 
Hill, Va. From this camp 
several expeditions and 
raids were made. 
Apr. 20. En route by transport to 
Newport News and march 
via Big Bethel to York- 
town. 

21-May 4. Camp at York- 
town. 
May 4-6. On transport up the 
James River. 
6. Landed at Bermuda Hun- 
dred and marched to near 
Point of Rocks, on the 
Appomattox. 
7-S. Fngaged enemy near 
Port Walthal and on 
Petersburg Pike. 
9-10. Fighting, skirmishing, 
and destroying railroad. 
Battle of Swift Creek on 
the 9th. 

11. Resting in intrenchments 
near Point of Rocks. 

12-14. Fighting and skirmish- 
ing along the Richmond 
and Petersburg turnpike, 
principal actions being at 
Warebottom Church and 
Proctor's Creek. 

15. Holding captured works 
to the left of the Pike 
near Fort Darling (Drurv's 
Bluff). 

16. Battle of Drurv's Bluff. 

17-29. Slashing timber, in- 
trenching, skirmishing. 
reconnoitering, ere., at van- 



178 



THREE YEARS WITH THE 



ous points along the Ber- 
muda front. 

29-30. On transports via 
James, York, and Pamun- 
key Rivers to White House. 

30-June 1. On march to Cold 
Harbor. 
June 1-11. Battle of Cold Harbor 
and in trenches and ad- 
vance rifle pits there. 

12. Marched to White House. 

13-14. On transports back to 
Bermuda Hundred. 

15. Crossed the Appomat- 
tox, battle of Petersburg- 
Heights. 

15-Aug. 27. In and about 
the trenches in siege of 
Petersburg. Variously sta- 
tioned; near corps head- 
quarters, near Beasley 
House, "Among the Pines," 
near Mortar Battery (called 
1 ' Petersburg Express ' ' ) , 
in the Ravine, at Battle of 
the Mine, etc. 
Aug. 27-Sept. 2S. On Bermuda front 
near the James River, 
south bank. 
Sept. 28, Marched at night across 
the James; received Spen- 
cer repeating rifles. 

29. Battle of Chapin's Farm 
and capture of Fort Harri- 
son. 



30. Battle of "Holding the 
Fort" against three charges 
of the enemy. 

30-Oct. 27. In intrenchments 
in vicinity of the captured 
fort, now called Fort Burn- 
ham. 
Oct. 27. Marched to Seven Pines 
arnl Fair Oaks. 

25. Second battle of Fair Oaks. 
29-Nov. 2. In trenches and 

works in vicinity of Fort 
Burnham. 
Nov. 3. Marched to Aiken's Land- 
ing under orders which 
were there revoked. 
Nov. 4-7. In reserve near Fort 
Burnham. 
7. Marched to Deep Bottom 
to meet an expected attack. 
S-Apr. 3, 1SG5. In camps in 
vicinity of the New Market 
Road, at the nearest point 
of our works to Rich- 
mond. 
Apr. 3. Entered Richmond. 

4-June 14. In camp near 
Manchester, opposite Rich- 
mond. 
June 14. Down the James en route 
for home. 
17. In New York City. 
19. Reached Pittsburgh. 

26. Mustered out. 












Summary of Regimental Statistics 

Captain Phisterer, "late of the U. S. Army," in his elaborate 
work, New York in the War of the Rebellion (1890), gives statistics 
pertaining to New York regiments. While not altogether correct 
they may be considered official, for he had access to muster rolls, 
war records and data of the United States and the State of Xew 
York. 

The following figures concerning the 118th Xew York Volunteers 
are given. 

He says that the total number of officers and men serving with 
the regiment, ISG2-1865, is 1,250. This is a mistake to begin with, 
for our Service Roll, including recruits, numbers 1,325. 

Killed in Action: (5 officers, 55 men. 

Wounded in Action: \) officers, 285 men, of whom the officers and 
226 men survived their wounds. Many of these were, however, 
discharged for disability caused by their wounds. 



> 






ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 179 

Captured in Action: 9 officers, 140 men; of these men 12 died 
in prison of their wounds and 33 of disease. The number of men 
never heard from after capture and supposed to have died in 
prison is not given. 

Total Casualties: Killed, wounded and missing, 504. 

Died of Disease: 179 men. The number discharged for disability 
from disease and wounds is not given; many of these died. 

With killed, died from disease and wounds, discharged for dis- 
ability, continuing in hospitals at muster-out of regiment and 
those turned over to- the 96th New York Volunteers, at Rich- 
mond, only 299 officers and men were left of all the 1.325 who 
served with the regiment, to return home with the organization. 

Captain Phisterer gives the following regimental casualty record 
in the named actions: 

South Anna Bridge, July 4, '63: Killed, 2 men; wounded, 
1 officer, 5 men; missing, 2 men — total, 10. 

Operatioxs before Petersburg and Richmond, May 8-31, 
'64, including actions at Port Walthal, Chester Station, Swift 
Creek and Drury's Bluff: Killed, 3 officers, 39 men; wounded, 

3 officers, 94 men, of whom 14 men died of their wounds; missing, 

4 officers, 42 men — total, 185. 

Cold Harbor, June 1-12, '64: Killed, 1 officer, 8 men; wounded, 
1 officer, 22 men, of whom 4 men died of wounds — total, 32. 

Assaults on Petersburg, June 15-19, '64: Killed, 1 officer, 
1 man; wounded, 1 officer, 18 men, of whom 5 men died of wounds 
— total, 21. 

Chapin's Farm and Fort Harrison, September 29-30, '64: 
Killed, 3 men; wounded, 4 officers, 60 men, of whom 4 men died 
of wounds — total, 67. 

Second Fair Oaks, October 27-29, '64 : Killed, 1 officer, 1 man ; 
waunded, 2 officers, 13 men, of whom 4 men died of wounds; 
missing, 5 officers, 89 men — total, 111. 

There were other regimental casualties in skirmishes, raids and 
other minor affairs. 

While Provost Marshal of Portsmouth, Va. 
j 

I served as Provost -Marshal of the City and District of Ports- 
mouth, Va., from the last part of January to the middle of June, 
1865, involving a variety of service and experience. Nearly every day 
brought some new feature and, on the whole, I enjoyed the service. 

I found Brigadier General Israel Vogdes, a Major in the regular 
army, in command of tiie District of Portsmouth, which included 
the territory between the Elizabeth and Nansemond rivers. 



180 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

For myself, I was appointed by, reporting; and responsible to 
Department Headquarters, although General Yogdes also ap- 
pointed me as of his staff. 

I was to reorganize the military government of the city, which 
was not so difficult, having officers and soldiers stationed there 
to draw upon for service. We had a Provost Court, Departments 
of Police, Fire, Streets and Markets. Our principal revenue came 
from market licenses and trading privileges. We had some citizen 
employees, bookkeepers, etc. 

The citizens were chiefly women, but there was a large transient 
population of soldiers, sailors, marines, speculators and traders. 
The Navy had exclusive jurisdiction of the navy yard and the 
grounds of the U. S. Naval Hospital, but we had but one conflict 
of authority, and that trifling. 

A sailor provoked a "row" in the city streets one day and escaped 
to the navy yard; but our provost guard pursued him and actually 
entered the navy yard, arrested and brought him to the city prison. 
The Naval Commandant did not find it out until the next day 
when he sent me a ponderous protesting communication. Of 
course the prisoner was surrendered, his offense being left to the 
Navy for punishment; but the Commandant sent another lengthy 
complaint, serious enough to provoke a national controversy be- 
tween the Army and Navy. I answered this in person and sug- 
gested that there might be contributory fault and criticism of the 
Navy Yard discipline which made it possible for our patrol to enter 
the commandants' jurisdiction, arrest and take one of his men 
from the yard without even a protest at the time. 

I returned him his last elaborate communication and we shook 
hands over calling the whole incident "off." 

I soon found that I needed some one who had resided in Ports- 
mouth for some time and knew the people — some level-headed 
man whom I could safely consult at times — and found such a 
man in Rev. Father Plunkett of the Catholic Church. We be- 
came good friends and 1 found him discreet and reliable and 
became indebted to him for his service. 

There were many officers of the Navy stationed there and quite a 
number of Army officers. Some of these had their families with 
them, so there was quite a pleasant social life with those of my own 
sentiments. There were many social functions, some quite elaborate. 

I also became acquainted with many pleasant families of the 
city who were fairly courteous and cordial considering our "wide- 
apartness" on the subject of the war; but as there was no profit, 
in discussing that subject it was usually avoided. 





- 


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A v { 














1 




Captain 




DAVID F. DOBIE 






Lieutenant 
ROWLAND C. KELLOGG 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 181 

My acquaintance with one family, that of a widow who had 
two or three sons in the Confederate service, brought out this 
story. When Portsmouth was first occupied by Federal troops 
the homes were searched for anything that might be of service 
or value to the enemy. This family had some silver plate which 
was brought by ancestors from France and- of much sentimental 
and considerable intrinsic value. This plate was buried in the 
cellar of their home, but our soldiers found it and carried it away. 
She believed it was simply stolen, " soldiers' loot"; but I, faint- 
heartedly, claimed that it must have been done under orders 
which would not now be given against such distinctly private 
property, and believed it could be found. I sent an officer to 
Fortress Monroe to make inquiries and, somewhat to my surprise. 
he found that the silver was there in a bag labeled with the family 
name. I then proceeded to get the silver and had the pleasure 
of restoring it to its owner — to our mutual delight. 

I could mention several interesting incidents and experiences, 
but they would reach too much into private life to be exploited. 

I "messed" with General Vogdes and his staff in a sort of family 
way. One of his staff was from Troy, N. Y., Lieutenant W. E. 
Kisselberg of the 169th N. Y. Volunteers, who after the war 
became editor of the Troy Daily Times. Lieutenant Wo: den, 
son of Captain Worden, Commander of the celebrated Monitor, 

was an aide on Vogdes' staff. 

... 
At the request of a friend of its owner I made a sort of home in 

one part of a double dwelling. It was thought that such occupancy 

would better protect the property. For office purposes we used 

the building of the Bank of Virginia. 

General Vogdes was after a while relieved as Commander of 

the District by General Charles K. Graham, whom I had met 

several times. General Graham had been Colonel of a regiment 

of the Excelsior Brigade commanded by General Daniel E. Sickles. 

Graham had also commanded what was called the "Potomac 

y 

Flotilla," a mixed fleet of small gunboats which served with the 
Armies of the Potomac and James. He brought his wife with 
him and occupied the other part of the double house in which I 
lodged. General Graham was an attractive gentleman, of the 
well-known Now York City family of Grahams, and I appreciated 
my association with him. I was especially pleased with his adju- 
tant general, Captain R. Dale Benson of Philadelphia, and our 
friendship has continued all through the years since. He became 
Brigadier General in the National Guard of Pennsylvania and 
for some years President of the Pennsylvania Fire Insurance 



182 THREE YEARS WITH THE 



Company of Philadelphia. He was everywhere and at all times 
a gentleman. 

A detective was sent to Portsmouth from Department Head- 
quarters to see if he could locate sources of information which 
was "leaking" through our lines to the enemy. His plan was to 
pose as a Confederate sympathizer who had procured a pass to 
Richmond where he pretended he was about to go. He proposed 
to mingle with local friends of the Confederacy and see if there 
were not those who would confide letters or verbal contraband 
information for those outside our lines. 

One young woman was tempted to give him a letter to her 
brother, a Confederate soldier, and for this violation of " regula- 
tions" she was arrested and held in prison for trial. 

Her friends appealed to me to secure her release. Investigation 
proved that this girl was plainly enough a victim of the detective, 
who had urged and over-persuaded her. 

The letter itself was a simple girlish affair; its only reference 
to military matters was the statement that "there are lots of 
Yankee soldiers here and some of them are mighty good-looking !" 

Her technical offense was promoted by the detective to show 
that he was "doing things." The girl was released and the 
detective recalled. 

It is too much the habit of detectives to "frame up" jobs in 
order to detect something and get credit for themselves and make 
trouble for innocent people. 

Suffolk was the outpost of our military district and we ran one 
train daily to that point. Many refugees from the Confederate 
side came to Suffolk, mostly colored people with now and then a 
Confederate deserter, and all such were brought to Portsmouth. 
The colored people were turned over to a bureau organized to 
care for them and make them useful. 

There were many agents from the North seeking enlistments 
to make up quotas of their respective sections under the last 
Federal call for soldiers, and enlistments of colored men counted 
for credit. As large numbers of negro refugees arrived in Ports- 
mouth I was much besieged by these agents and offered 
from SoOO to S500 for every negro that I would turn over to 
them for enlistment. I could have made a good-sized total of 
dollars in this illegitimate traffic, in which some others profitably 
indulged. 

In looking over a "squad" of refugees as they were being 
registered in our office one evening on their arrival from Suffolk, 
I found an attractive young Miss, who on questioning proved 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 183 

interesting. She was wearing three dresses, the outer erne quite 
common and travel-stained. She had the rest of her "belonging.-"' 
in a bundle. She was born in the North and lived there until 
her mother married a Virginian for her second husband, when 
she and this daughter went to that state, just before the war. 
Her stepfather became an officer in the Confederate army and had 
been killed. Her mother had lately died and this young woman 
had been living with some relatives of the stepfather who were, 
at least, not congenial. She claimed that the difficult}' was largely 
because of her Union sympathies. She had a brother, an officer 
in the Federal army, if living, and she had relatives in Baltimore. 
I She determined to run away from her home and get through the 
lines and she had been some days on the tramp with colored 
refugees and been much helped and favored by them. Dusty 
and bedraggled she presented a forlorn appearance, but seemed 
happy in having reached the Union side of the war line. I did 
not send her to the refugee rendezvous, but had her taken to 
a boarding house and asked her to report in the morning and see 
what could be done for her. 

She appeared in the morning; but I hardly knew her, for in 
•another dress and after a painstaking toilet, she was "pleasant 
to behold." Indeed she was quite charming in manner and con- 
versation, bound to make a good impression, and did. 

Transportation was provided for her to Baltimore and she wrote 
me of her safe arrival with expressions of gratitude. Later on. 
a young man friend of hers having business in Norfolk called on 
me to mention his thanks for the help I had rendered "one of the 
finest girls of my acquaintance." 

Just before I left Portsmouth I received another letter from her, 
rejoicing that the war had ended and noting that she was engaged 
to the gentleman who had called on me. 

I frequently visited the hospitals of the vicinity. We had quite 
a large hospital in Portsmouth, the "Balfour,'' using a former 
hotel building, and there was the large Hampton Hospital 
near Fortress Monroe. Sick and wounded of our Regiment were 
in both. For a while my brother was at Hampton in a contest 
with typhoid fever. Typhoid and other intestinal troubles were 
the bane of our army, occasioning terrible suffering and mortality 
with prolonged and even permanent disability. The medical 
treatment of these diseases, especially typhoid, was so contrary 
to present therapeutics that it is a wonder so many survived. 
The then lack of antiseptics resulted in great loss of life and limb 
from wounds, which could have been saved by modern surgery. 



184 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Baffling; septic complications were so reasonably expected that 

the safest treatment of serious wounds in arms and legs was 
amputation. 

While our hospitals had the appreciated helpfulness of the 
Sanitary and Christian Commissions, with supplies of lint, band- 
ages, delicacies, etc., they were not to be compared with the 
present (1918) efficiently organized comfort and mercy ministra- 
tions of the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, etc. 

We had faithful and willing nurses, but mostly without training 
or experience. One patient said of his nurse, "She is rather 
awkward and bungling, but her beautiful sympathy helps." 

There was, however, this satisfaction in visiting these rendezvous 
of mutilated and suffering humanity — the very best that could 
be done was being done, and life and health and comfort were 
being conserved. 

One day "while in Norfolk I was introduced to Vice-President 
Andrew Johnson who was visiting there. Had some conversation 
with him, he doing most of it. He impressed me as a resolute, 
determined sort of man, with confidence in himself. He was 
decidedly democratic, readily mingling with all sorts, and I felt, 
somehow, that he was too common. A fellow officer remarked 
at the time that if Lincoln should die, it would be an additional 
misfortune to the country if Johnson should become President, 
which proved a sort of prophecy. 

Admiral Farragut was residing in Norfolk when the war began, 
but hastily and unceremoniously left to continue service in the 
United States Navy. He returned to Norfolk while I was at 
Portsmouth, and a reception was given him at the theater in 
Norfolk. Arim' and Navy officers on our side of the river were 
invited to attend. There were speeches, that by the Admiral 
being brief. He said he "left Norfolk for Norfolk's good and 
returned for his own pleasure." After the formal reception some 
of us spent a while with the Admiral in informal conversation 
which we very much enjoyed. 

His fine, resolute features softened as he talked and lost some- 
what their heroic aspect. He was by no means fluent, but agree- 
ably natural and friendly. He was asked about the report (which 
has become history) of his being lashed to the rigging of his flag- 
ship in the battle of Mobile Bay. He smiled and said that it 
was an ''exaggeration": that when the smoke of the battle 
settled down upon the water he did climb the shrouds of his ship 
to get above the smoke for an observation of the situation; that 
he took with him a short rope and with that loosely about his 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 185 

. 

body and the two ends tightly held in his hand as he grasped the 
shroud, made a sort of support as he leaned in different directions 
for an all-around view. He denied any "lashing" as something 
quite ridiculous for the commander of a fleet in action. 

In the capitol at Washington there is a painting with Farragut 
somewhat "roped" to the rigging of his ship, immortalizing a 
thing that never was. 

Much has been said of late in appreciation of the real music 
quality of our American negro melodies, especially of the 
"spirituals," or religious songs — of their musical excellence 
among the folk-songs of the world. Their unique origin has 
been discussed, for they have been composed, words and music 
at the same time, under stress of religious excitement at camp- 
meetings and other devotional gatherings, suggesting inspirational 
derivation. 

These songs have surety grown in popularity and now grace 
the programs of vocal celebrities here and abroad. 

I suppose I was present at the "making" of one of these songs, 
although I haven't heard the song since. 

During an evening stroll in Portsmouth with a naval officer 
friend, we came to a colored church wherein a prayer meeting was 
in progress. The doors and windows were open and we listened 
awhile to the singing and then went in. 

Perhaps a hundred or more colored men and women were there, 
and they had reached an ecstasy of religious, perhaps spirit ual, 
elation produced quite entirely by singing. There were faintings 
and prostrations from the "power of der 'mighty spirit" and 
shoutings of "joy in der Lord!" 

Words and music seemed to be emotionally extemporized. 
One would sing a line, which, if " taking," became a refrain. Other 
words or lines were added by other contributors. Again the 
I lines would be broken up and some of the "fragments," often the 
terminal word, or words covering the thought, or those most 
resonant, would be used as a chorus with many repetitions. The 
words and the music varied somewhat in these repeatings, but were 
all the time growing in rhythm and into plaintive song, the crude 
material merging and melting into a settled "finish." We 
wondered at the right-away, spontaneous harmony of the many 
voices; it seemed like a process of progressive composition under 
instructed practice. 

Reaching my "quarters" that night I jotted down as well as 
I could remember the following words of the "creation" we had 



listened to. Sorry 1 couldn't notate the music: 



18G THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Ah thinks Ah hoar mah Saviour savin', - 

A whisperin' in mah soul; 
Ah thinks Ah hear mah Saviour savin', 

A whisperin' in mah soul; 
Dat in dat day, dat glory day, 
We hain't got noffin' else ter do — 

Nofiin' else ter do — 
Jess ter sing Jerusalem! 
In der New Jerusalem — 
He's whisperin' in mah soul — 

Nof-fin-else-ter-do. 
Jerusalem! Jerusalem! 

The longer lines came mostly from a sympathetic soprano 
voice but not at first just as above written. The chorus dealt 
for awhile in repeating '■Whisperin' in mah soul'' and "Dat glory 
day." The idea of respite from labor seemed delectable and 
much feeling and emphasis were put into "Noffin' else to do," 
while ''Jerusalem " seemed a satisfactory "mouthful" and served 
as a hallelujah. There were fine shades of accentuation from the 
piano of "Whisperin' in mah soul'' to the forte of "Jerusalem." 

Other lines like "Der glory day am comin " were offered but 
failed of being built into the song. 

This song sounded in my memory for a long while and even 
yet somewhat lingers. It seemed a curious production curiously 
produced — all during an hour or so. 

Seeing us there may have been the provocation for taking a 
collection, which '"eluded de ex'cises ob de ebenin'." 

One afternoon I was advised that a man had been brought in 
under arrest by verbal order of General Vogdes, and that the 
man wished to see me. To my happy surprise — for 1 was very 
glad to see him — I found that the arrested man was Colonel Edgar 
M. Cullen of the 96th New York, one of my most intimate and 
appreciated Army friends. Colonel Cullen's term of service had 
expired and he had been mustered out. On his way home to 
Brooklyn he decided to spend a few days with me at Portsmouth. 

A few days previous to his arrival General Vogdes had issued 
an order for the arrest of any citizen wearing soldier clothing, 
or any officer or soldier wearing any uniform or insignia not 
corresponding to his rank. This was to discourage what was 
getting to be a nuisance; i. e., citizens procuring and wearing gov- 
ernment clothing, even private soldiers "sporting" in officers' 
apparel obtained by borrowing or other means. 

When Colonel Cullen came by ferry from Norfolk to Ports- 
mouth he wore his old fatigue blouse from which he had removed 
the shoulder straps; but the color of the blouse had faded in 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT . 187 

service while the bright blue distinctly showed where the straps 
had been, clearly indicating that the coat had been that of an 
officer. General Vogdes happened to be on the ferry boat and 
observed Colonel Cullcn and particularly his blouse. He at once 
and in his gruff manner asked the Colonel if he was an army 
officer. Receiving the reply that he was only a private citizen, 
the General became abusive and indulged in profanity, resulting 
in the Colonel replying that the General was ''no gentleman.'' 
The General ordered Cullen taken to the Provost Marshal's 
office under arrest. 

The Colonel thanked him for the honor of an escort, saying 
that he was on his way to call on the Provost Marshal. 

I had a delightful visit of a few days with Colonel Cullen, but 
the more he thought of General Vogdes' abuse, the less he felt- 
like tolerating it and finally he decided to prefer charges against 
him for "language and conduct unbecoming an officer," etc. As' 
the war ended soon after, the charges were never tried. 

Little did General Vogdes then think, nor, even with my ap- 
preciation of the ability of this young man, did I, of his future 
eminence. He became and for a long period was the honored and 
able Chief Justice of the New York Court of Appeals. He con- 
tinued delightfully loyal to the friends of his army life, of which 
I have had happy experience. 

After Appomattox and the surrender of Lee, hundreds of Con- 
federate officers and soldiers came to Portsmouth through Suffolk 
and not having taken the oath of parole, we administered this 
oath and made the required records. 

We now had the unique experience of daily mingling with out- 
late active enemies and some pleasant acquaintances grew out 
of it. No restraint was put upon them; they went where and 
did as they pleased, and as a whole they added pleasure to the 
life of the city. 

I never had a little bit of hate for Confederate soldiers. I 
considered them sincere and conscientious and they were certainly 
brave. I did execrate their cause; but often wondered if I 
wouldn't have regarded it differently had I been Southern "born 
and brought up." 

The thing which has ''rankled" in my spirit, and still docs when 
I think of it, was the general treatment of their prisoners. The 
lingering suffering of Federal prisoners in Confederate prisons 
and camps and the awful mortality were the big horror of the Civil 
War. Nearly fifty men of our Regiment died in Confederate 
prisons. ■ ' 



188 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Soon after my arrival in Portsmouth mention was made of a 
quite young lady resident who, because of her social position, 
personal attractions and activity, had been a considerable in- 
fluence in behalf of the Confederacy. She was particularly promi- 
nent in the beginning of the war, going so far as to "boycott" 
or proscribe social recognition of young men who did not enlist, 
.and this interdiction on the part of her "set" was quite compelling. 

Although still but little past girlhood, she was reported as being 
bitterly hostile to all tilings Federal and undoubtedly willing to 
hazard much to serve her cause — in fact she was "commended" 
to me as needing to be watched. 

I came to know her by sight and when about to meet me on 
the street she would cross to the other side to avoid, I suppose, 
contamination from a too-near Yankee uniform. She was more 
tolerant of Navy officers, her father having been a Navy officer 
in his lifetime. 

An elderly naval officer, a friend of the family before the war, 
and whom I much liked, suggested that I call on this young Miss 
and her widow-mother — just a formal official call. I hesitated 
to go where I was not wanted, but as he was accustomed to call 
and would go with me, I "dared," and was received with conven- 
tional politeness and more cordiality than expected — even 
thanked for my call. 

The young lad}' was surely equipped for influencing young men, 
although then restrained by our well-understood but unmentioned 
difference in political allegiance. She did not afterwards cross 
the street to avoid me. 

After Lee's surrender an important social affair was given by a 
popular naval officer and his bride residing near "our" young 
lady whom the bride had met and whom she invited to the 
reception — more as a neighborly politeness than believing she 
would accept. 

It was quite a brilliant function. The house abounded in plants, 
flowers and color. A pretty garden in rear was covered with 
canvas and illuminated, making a handsome sort of conservatory. 

The marine band furnished the music; the attendance was 
large and Army and Navy full-dress provided a "blue and gold'' 
effect. 

She came! — a little late, but our "Fair Confederate Miss" 
came, occasioning a bit of temporary embarrassment to the busts. 

Her costume was of rich material, somewhat quaint in style, 
but. becoming — decidedly becoming. The dainty little maiden 
made a pretty picture and I believe she knew it. She was demurely 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 189 

I • 

quiet; she mingled with a reserve that by no means detracted r 

graciously receiving introductions, but declined to dance. 

She left early and our hostess asked me to escort her home. 

Reaching her home she said that having the chance she wsuld 
like a few minutes talk with me and invited me in. 

She promptly proceeded to say that she supposed that her 
presence at "the party" was a surprise: that she had no thought 
of going until she jokingly said to some of her Confederate soldier 
friends that perhaps she would, and they replied that if she did 
it would discount their respect for her, which she regarded as a 
challenge and it decided her to go. 

She went on at some length and with much feeling to say that 
her very soul had been with her people of the South; that she 
had wrought and prayed for success and grieved that all had utterly 
failed; that she had given serious thought to the situation and 
deliberately concluded that it was God's will; that she must 
accept the inevitable and act according!}'; that she had decided 
to take the oath of allegiance and purposed calling at our office 
on the morrow for that purpose. She felt that she would be 
ostracized by her best friends, but with her it had become a matter 
of conscientious dutj' to do it and to do it now. 

She came the next day and solemnly and seriously took the 
oath, and I felt sure she would be as loyal to the Federal govern- 
ment as she had been to the "Lost Cause," for she was a sincere 
and resolute character — older than her years. 

This incident is given as an example, perhaps exceptional in 
some respects, of the natural, self-operating, individual process 
of reconstruction, even in one so ardently devoted to the South. 

This womanly young woman, abundant in the delicacy, sympa- 
thy and affection of her sex, had also the unsentimental, practical 
common-sense outlook for which men are more suspected. 

Near midnight of April 14, 1865, General Graham came to my 
rooms in full uniform and fully accoutered — most unusual for 
an ordinary call. He was pale and visibly excited. Pie handed 
me a War Department, telegram announcing the assassination of 
President Lincoln with warning to be alert against any uprising, 
suggesting that the assassination might be the signal for a general 
insurgency. 

This was a benumbing shock. We decided not to give out the 
news until morning, and it was left for me to do what seemed best 
to protect the city. I had no fear of the conduct of the hundreds 
of paroled Confederate soldiers then in the city; but I had a 
company of cavalry come in from its camp and patrol the city 






190 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

and placed a few pieces of artillery at central points. Also put 
commanding officers of the camps outside "on the alert," but 
without giving the reason. 

I rode about the city during most of the night, less because I 
feared any danger to the city than from the effect of the awful 
news. The dimly lighted, sleeping city with its silence seemed to 
fit the fact that the great gentle-hearted Lincoln was dead. 

This greatest of Americans — altogether American — this won- 
derful growth of "a root out of a dry ground"! 

Born as lowly as the Saviour of Mankind, of unschooled parents 
in an unschooled community, himself unschooled; born in an 
uncommonly common cabin with only poverty as his visible 
birthright. 

A farm laborer, woodsman, flat-boatman, unsuccessful store- 
keeper, country postmaster, self-instructed land surveyor, lawyer, 
state legislator, congressman — all with no recognized mark of 
destiny. 

As Moses, shepherding his father-in-law's flocks in Midian 
was being prepared for the burning-bush message and to become 
the mighty leader of the Exodus and the law-giver of Israel not 
only, but of the world; so was Lincoln under the inscrutable 
tuition of the Almighty to come into saving leadership when the 
conflagration of civil war menaced his country. 

And, Oh, the tragedy of it! the beyond human understanding! 
Like Moses who had but a God-given glimpse of the Promised Land 
from the heights of Nebo, "over against Jericho," so Lincoln, 
having brought his people into the blessed Canaan of a victorious 
peace, is not permitted to enjoy the blessings of his marvelous 
achievement — as we mortals think. 

Both of these great men fulfilled their destiny. 
"Lincoln is dead" seemed the solemn voice of the silent- 
night. 

In the morning we bulletined the sad news and its rapid spread 
was visible in its effect upon those who heard it. Very soon simple 
emblems of a real mourning appeared on residences and persons, 
often only fragments of black pinned to outer garments or fastened 
over doorways. The colored people seemed dazed, many of them 
believing that Lincoln's death meant the end of emancipation. 

About, noon a committee of paroled Confederates called, re- 
questing me to come out on the front steps of our office building. 
Doing this I found a large gathering of these men whose spokes- 
man feelingly expressed sorrow and sympathy in the national 
affliction, believing that thev had themselves lost a best friend. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 191 

I appreciated the significance of the incident and replied as gra- 
ciously as I could. 

In the afternoon I came across a sobbing boy, an excited negro 
and a dead dog. The boy complained that "This bad nigger 
killed my little dog." The boy had picked up a piece of black 
fabric which had fallen from some person or building, and in- 
fluenced by the prevalence of black in the city, had thoughtlessly 
tied it to his dog's tail and this had provoked the negro's ire. The 
frightened negro said, "Puttiiv mournin' on a dog's tail for Linkin, 
dat am too scan 'his, Sah, Ah couldn't no how help killin' dat dawg. 
Awful scan'lus!" The boy was too young to comprehend the 
common sorrow, but was surely broken-hearted over the tragedy 
of his pet. 

The day of Lincoln's funeral in Washington was observed by a 
procession of all the Army and Navy force in and about Ports- 
mouth, with some citizens and a large number of paroled Con- 
federates who asked permission to join the mournful pageant. 
After marching through the main streets we went over to Norfolk 
and joined a similar procession there, making a long marching line, 
and with muffled drums and the solemn dirges of several bands 
it was an impressive affair. All places of business were closed 
in both cities and an atmosphere of solemnity and sorrow prevailed. 

The war was over and I would be soon mustered out and further 
military government of Portsmouth unnecessary. An election 
under the civil charter of the city was ordered for mayor and other 
municipal officers, and it was held in orderly form. At an early 
meeting of the newly elected city officers my "administration" 
was pleasantly mentioned and after many farewell calls and 
pleasant good-bys, on the 15th of June, 1865, 1 joined my Regiment 
at Fortress Monroe on its homeward way. 

My service at Portsmouth was, in its altogether, a pleasant 
experience, with large variety of incident and interest. 

I have visited the city several times since the war, but even on 
my earliest visit I .found but few left of those I knew, and later, 
none. I have had a continued interest in that city's growth and 
prosperity. 

Regimental Reunion 

On the fourth anniversary of our Regiment's muster into the 
United States service, August 29, 1866, a Reunion of our officers 
was held at Essex, N. Y., the following account of which appeared 
in the Plattsburgh Sentinel, its editor being one of our guests. 
Its reproduction may add some features of interest to those 
interested in the regiment. 



192 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Reunion of the IISth. We believe in reunions, especially such as 
occurred at Eggleston's Hotel in Essex, on the evening of Wednesday last, 
the 29th ult. We pronounce it a model entertainment in its most essential 
features, among which we mention with pleasure the following: 

1. Its Simplicity and Cordiality. There was no vain and empty show — 
no pomp — just a hearty and cordial reunion of old comrades. Not an officer 
appeared with uniform or epaulet or badge to designate his rank; but the 
cordial handshake, the ''how are you old boy!'' "I am glad to see you once 
more," etc., fully demonstrated that they had met — not to be seen, but to 
see each other and renew comradeship. 

2. Its Moral Character. "Let us speak of a man as we find him," and be 
it said to the honor of the occasion, that spirituous liquors were entirely 
counted out of the program, while we do not recollect hearing a profane 
or other word that might not be uttered in the presence of ladies. It was a 
gathering of gentlemen. 

3. Its Social and Intellectual Character. A good substantial supper, such 
as was furnished by Mr. Eggleston, naturally comes under the social head, 
and right at this point "our story begins." At about half past eight, the 
following officers of the IISth, and invited guests, a fair proportion of whom 
were accompanied by ladies, numbering more than fifty in all, gathered around 
the richly laden tables of ''mine host" — tables which resembled parterres, 
so brilliant were they with numerous bouquets, Flora's Tribute to the brave: 

S. T. Richards, Warrensburgh, 1st Colonel of the regiment. 

Major J. L. Cunningham, Glens Falls. 

Captains J. Parmerter. H. J. Adams, H. S. Ransom, P. K. DeLancy, 
D. F. Dobie, W. H. Bailey, Pittsburgh: /. H. Pierce, Bloomingdale; 
R. C. Kellogg, R. W. Livingston, Eluabethtown; John Brydon, Crown 
Point; C. W. Wells, Black Brook; 2f. V. B. Stetson, Champlain; Dennis 
Stone, Warrensburgh. 

Lieutenants M. X. Dickinson, Warrensburgh; James S. Garrett, Glens Falls; 
P. V. X. McLean and Henry Mould, Keeseville; J. S. Boynton, Peru; William 
Bidwell, Plattsburgh; J. H. Calkins, Schuyler Falls; J. W. Trcadway, Port 
Henry; J. W, Angell, Sciota; E. 0. Welch, Westport; and N. Arnold, Franklin 
Falls' 

Adjutant J. L. Carter, Ellenburgh. 

Chaplain C. L. Hagar, Plattsburgh. 

Guests 

Hon. William Iligby, M. C, California; Hon. P. E. Havens, Essex; Col. 
W. E. Calkins. Tieonderogn ; Capt. James McGuire, Kecseviile; A. C. H. 
Livingston, Ed. Elizabethtown Post; and A. W. Lansing, Ed. Plattsburgh 
Sentinel. 

Grace by Chaplain Hagar, after which immediate preparations were com- 
menced for the hlling-up process so essential and agreeable to the material 
man. Those who had been "mess"-mates formerly, and who had learned to 
admire the culinary arts and dodges of their incomparable Hogan, a jewel 
of a provider, proving himself equal to the unchristian shifts and emergencies 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 193 

of the camp and march, could also appreciate the more extended appliances 
of peaceful life. This important matter over, then began ''the feast of reason 
and flow of soul." 

Colonel Richards who presided, made a few modest opening remarks ex- 
pressive of the pleasure he experienced in again meeting with his old comrades. 
He said there had been no mistakes in the selection of officers for the USth. 

Major Cunningham, officer of the day, read letters from Hon. R. S. Hale, 
Hon. S. Brown, General John Hammond, General Moffitt, General Nichols, 
Col. L. S. Dominy, Major Peck of the 9th Vermont, and others, and a telegram 
from Hon. S. M. Weed, regretting their inability to be present. 

1st regular toast — Our first reunion: While reviving past associations 
mingling sad and pleasant memories, may it renew the tie of friendship and 
strengthen our bond of union. 

It was feelingly replied to by Major Cunningham in place of Lt.-Col- 
L. S. Dominy, absent. 

Song, "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," by Lieutenant Garrett and 
chorus. 

2d toast — Our absent comrades; whether separated by earthly distances or 
the boundary stream of lime — yet with us in loving memory. 

Responded to by Chaplain Hagar. Among other things he alluded to the 
battle of Drury's Bluff, to the cloud of darkness that hung over them as they 
counted their dead, wounded and missing. He read the names of officers 
who had answered the "roll-call" and gone up from the sacrificial altar of 
their country — Major Pruyn, Captains Riggs and J. S. Stone; Lieutenants 
Reynolds, Stevenson, Wing, Little, and others. 

3d toast — Our flag — torn from Sumpter, baptized in the blood of a hundred 
battles, to float again, as henctforih it ever shall, tlie flag of the free! 

The response was by the Hon. William Higby, Member of Congress, from 
California, a -native of Essex County, and who once bivouacked with the 118th, 
in the heart of the Dismal Swamp. He gave a stirring talk. 

Song — "Star Spangled Banner" — all rising. 

4th toast — Our Country has weathered the storm, and rides safely at anchor 
in the harbor of peace. 

The response by Captain Pierce was impressively patriotic. 

Song, with chorus — "A Thousand Years," by Lieutenant Dickinson. 

oth toast — Our citizen friends — ichose hearts were with us, and whose 
eyes were upon us during our three years' service. 

Replied to bv Hon. P. E. Havens. He dwelt more on details. The war 
was not a war of races so much as of principles. It sprang from the people, 
not to add laurels to the brow of a monarch, but to save a country. Enthusiasm 
ruled the hour then; but now, when the sword is returned to its scabbard, 
some are in danger of forgetting for what cause it was unsheathed. But God 
overrules — "He is the power behind the throne, the majesty and strength 
behind and above nations — in Him is our trust." 

tJth toast — The ladies: The thought of their approving smiles cheend out 
bivouacs and warmed our hearts when camp fires burned low. We arc rewarded 
by (}>eir welcome and gracious presence. 



104 THREE YEARS WITH TILE 

* 
Response by Captain Bailey. The Captain evidently eonsidered "brevity 
the soul of wit," and put much in a small compass. 
Song, by Lieutenant Dickinson. 
7th toast — The Press of our regimental district. 
Response by Editor A. W. Lansing. 

Sth toast — All our late local military organizations: Comrades of battles 
many, comrades of marches many, brothers in storm, brothers in calm — we 
love them all. 

Responded to by Colonel Calkins of Ticonderoga. In his most genial vein 
he "brought down the house." He alluded to the 5th Cavalry, 9Gth, 77th, 
153d, 3Sth, and 22d N. Y. Vols. Infantry; and closed with a glowing tribute 
to the 118th. 

9th toast — Our old regimental mess — Oh, what a mess! 
Responded to by Major Cunningham, officer of the day, who read an 
original anonymous rhyme entitled "Hogan's Mess." Cannot the gallant 
Major give us some information concerning the author of this facetious 
excellency? 

An original contribution sung by Major C came next. 

The regular toasts being disposed of, the following resolution was offered 
by Captain Ransom: 

Resolved, That Major Cunningham, our '"committee of one," is deserving 
our hearty thanks for the responsibility he has taken and the labor he has 
performed in getting us together and preparing for our enjoyment of this 
occasion. 

The following was also adopted: 

Resolved, That our thanks be extended to the ladies of Essex for the pro- 
fusion of flowers which adorn our tables and so fittingly symbolize that charm 
of beautv and delight which would have been more fullv contributed by the 
presence of their fair donors. 

Captain Pierce with remarks eulogistic of Hon. Orlando Kellogg, the 
"Father of our Regiment," offered the following preamble and resolution 
written by Captain Livingston: 

Whereas, The USth Regiment, X. Y. Volunteers, was organized during 
the dark hours of the late rebellion, just as the campaign on the Peninsula 
had been declared a failure, and while the second battle of Bull Run and 
Chantilly were being fought to their unsuccessful conclusion, and while the 
public mind was depressed by the apparent uselessness of the great sacrifices 
the country was making; whereas we were very materially aided in our efforts 
to perfect such organization by the influence and effective labors of the late 
Hon. Orlando Kellogg, as well as cheered on in our path of duty by his 
words of patriotic and paternal encouragement, and during the whole term 
of our service we felt that he was zealously guarding our interests, while we 
repeatedly experienced the benefits of his fostering care; and whereas, on this 
our first reunion since the close of our history as an organization, we deem 
it eminently proper that we express our sense of his great service to us and 
to the cause we upheld and the profound grief we, in common with the great 
body of his constituents, have experienced in his untimely death; then fore. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 195 

Resolved, That in the death of the Hon. Orlando Kellogg, late Repre- 
sentative in Congress from this District, we feel that we have lost a very 
true, helpful and dear friend, who ever made the interests of the 118th Regi- 
ment his own, whose presence always cheered our hearts and whose eloquence 
roused our patriotism and military ardor; and that the country has lost a 
true patriot and valuable public servant. 

Remarks were made by Major Cunningham, Captains DeLaney, Rarmerter, 
and others, when the resolution was unanimously adopted. 

Senator Havens tendered a reception to the gathering at his beautiful 
home for the next- evening, but so many were obliged to leave the next after- 
noon that the offer had to be declined with thankful appreciation. 

Prayer was then offered by the Chaplain, and the company returned to the 
parlor, where they were amused by ''The Gospel according to St. Benjamin," 
read by Captain Dobie. They did not disperse till the small hours, and then 
it was with the understanding that the majority of the officers were to remain 
over to attend the business meeting next day. 

At the business meeting on Thursday morning, it was determined to hold 
the next reunion at Plattsburgh on the 29th of August, 1S67. Much other 
business was transacted. Major Livingston and Colonel Cunningham were 
appointed a Committee on Regimental History; Captains Dobie, Rrydon 
and Lieutenant Garrett were made a Committee on Permanent Organization 
of the Surviving Officers and the following were elected officers for the year: 
• Captain Livingston, Commandant; Captain Ransom, Lieutenant Com- 
mandant; Major Cunningham, Adjutant, and Captain DeLaney, Quarter- 
master. 

For all of us who attended our first reunion it was full of peculiar 
enjoyment, but in spite of abundant reasons why these reunions 
should be continued every year, only one other was held. 

As a sequel of this reunion an incident came to me which I 
greatly esteemed. The following from the Glens Falls Be publican 
of November, 1S66, tells the story: 

Warrcnsburgh was the scene of a pleasant affair on the evening of the 
27th ult. — the presentation of a Silver Pitcher to Colonel J. L. Cunningham, 
by the surviving officers of his regiment, the late llSth N. Y. Volunteers. The 
presentation took place at the residence of Duncan Griffin, Esq., and in the 
presence of a goodly number of ladies and gentlemen. 

The military delegation consisted of General Richards, Major Stone and 

Captains Dickinson and Garrett. Colonel C was entirely unconscious 

that the assemblage had more than a social significance and was thoroughly 
surprised when confronted by General Richards and Captain Garrett, the 
former bearing the pitcher and addressing him as follows: 

"Colonel: At our pleasant reunion last August, at Essex, we did some 
business behind your back, for which we now apologize. We adopted a resolu- 
tion appointing a committee to procure and present to you some testimonial 
which would, in a degree, evince our estimation of your worth as a gentleman, 
our esteem and affection for you as. a brave :ind...t rue-hearted comrade; and 



196 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

also to show our appreciation of your successful efforts in bringing us together 
at that time and proving by your good management to strengthen the ties 
which have ever bound us in a more than brotherhood. The inscription, 
which names the rank you held at the time of muster out and by which, you 
are best known among us and around which cluster our most lasting associa- 
tions, tells its own story and leaves nothing to be added except the great 
pleasure it affords us to be the representatives of the good-will which we all 
bear you, in presenting you, in behalf of your surviving brother officers of 
the late 118th X. Y. Volunteers, this testimonial, towards which every one 
of your officer-comrades has been pleased to contribute, and which is in- 
tended to token the united expression of our affection and esteem." 

Colonel Cunningham replied in substance as follows: 

"My dear Comrades: It is hard for me to rally sufficiently after this com- 
plete surprise to make fitting reply to your generous words. But as the 
earnestness of gratitude and thankfulness is not always in words, I beg you 
give me a lifetime to act out my appreciation of this unexpected and elegant 
assurance of your good-will. Nothing will ever give me greater pride than 
to know that I have the friendship of those whom I learned to appreciate 
through three years of common trial; those with whom I have served in the 
Adirondack Regiment. I cuuld ask no greater reward than this lasting token 
of your approval. 

''The success of our reunion at Essex was not so much the result of my 
efforts, as the influence of the mutual respect which was always the happy 
characteristic of our regiment, and which I trust will ever bless our future 
relations. I can but express my thanks and gratitude to you, and through 
you to my late associates, for their often repeated kindness and consideration 
and especially for this beautiful testimonial, of which, in the exercise of their 
large generosiiy, they have deemed me worthy. I shall preserve it as a peculiar 
treasure associated as it is with the deeds and glory of the 'Adirondack 
Regiment/' and its evidence* of the war-cemented fellow-hip of the men who 
gave it power to discharge with splendid fidelity its patriotic mission.'' 

The pitcher is from the house of Ball, Black & Company, New York, of 
pure silver, eleven inches high, neatly frosted and engraved — not with the 
emblems of war, but with the more appropriate symbols of peace. The 
modest inscription Presented to Major John L. Cunningham b>j his Brother 
Officers, 118th X. Y. Vols, spoke a volume, and the whole design is creditable 
to the taste of Captain Garrett, who had charge of its preparation. 

As already said, there was only one other reunion of the surviv- 
ing officers of our Regiment held at Plattsburgh, August 29. 1SG7. 
a rather complete account of which was given in the Plattsburgh 
Sentinel, and from which the following is a partial quotation: 

Second Reunion of the 118th. The Association convened at Captain 
Ransom's office, Plattsburgh. August 20. 1867, at 2:30 o'clock p.m. 

In the absence of Captain Livingston, the Association Commander, Captain 
Ransom. Lieutenant Commander, presided. Major J. L. Cunningham 'present, 
as Association Adjutant. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 197 

Captain Brydon, from the Committee on Constitution, presented a draft 
preamble and constitution, which, after some amendments, was, on motion 
of Captain Bailey, adopted. 

On the nomination of different members the following late officers of 
volunteers were elected honorary members, as provided for in the Constitu- 
tion, viz.: Major General George J. Stannard, Burlington; Brevet-Major 
General N.'M. Curtis, Ogdensburgh; Brevet-Brigadier General John Ham- 
mond, oth X. Y. Cavalry, Crown Point; Brevet-Brigadier General Stephen 
Moffitt, 9Gth N. Y. Volunteers, Pittsburgh; Brevet-Brigadier General 
Ripley, 9th Vt.; Colonel Frank Palmer, loth X. Y. Volunteers, Pittsburgh; 
Colonel Edgar M. Cullen, 96th N. Y. Volunteers, Brooklyn; Brevet-Lieutenant 
Colonel E. J. Barker, 5th N. Y. Cavalry, Crown Point; Chaplain X. Wardner, 
96th X". Y. Volunteers, and Chaplain Francis B. Hall, 16th X. Y. Volunteers, 
Plattsburgh. 

The Association then proceeded to ballot for officers for the ensuing year, 
with the following result: 

Captain Parmerter, Commander; Captain Ransom, Lieutenant Com- 
mander; Major Cunningham, Adjutant; Captain DeLaney, Quartermaster; 
CI arles Hagar, Chaplain. 

On motion of Surgeon Porteous it was Resolved, That our thanks be tendered 
to the Trustees and Citizens of the village of Glens Falls, for their munificent 
appropriation for the purpose of erecting a monument in honor of our fallen 
heroes . 

Major Cunningham, from the Committee on Regimental History, made a 
verbal report, and the committee, consisting of himself and Captain Livingston, 
was continued. 

Captain Ransom, acting Commander, announced the appointment of 
Captain Adams as Officer of the Day. 

THE REUXIOX PROPER 

The members and ladies with their friends assembled in the parlors of 
Fouquet's Hotel, and after interchange of greetings found their way to the 
Supper Hall. 

Present: Major J. L. Cunningham, Glens Falls; Captains Dobie. Ransom, 
Parmerter, Bailey, and Adams, Plattsburgh; Stetson, Champlain; Kellogg, 
Elizabethtown; Brydon, Crown Point; Pierce, Bloomingdalc; Wells, Black 
Brook. 

Lieutenants Gibbs. ' Westport; Angell, Mooers; McLean, Keeseville; 
Boynton, Peru; Treadway, Port Henry; Mattoon, Plattsburgh; Calkins, 
Peru; Mould, Keeseville. 

Surgeon Porteous, Luzerne. 

Qu:irt<-rmaster DeLaney, Plattsburgh, and Chaplain Hagar, Plattsburgh. 

Several of the above-named officers hold Brevet Commissions of higher grade 
than the rank named. 

Among the guests present were, Brevet-Brigadier General Edgar M. 
Cullen, Brooklyn,; Brevet-Brigadier General Stephen Moffitt, Plattsburgh 
and Captain Cook of the I'. S. Signal Service. Many ladies were present. 



198 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

The whole number of seats occupied were sixty. Lieutenant Commander 
Ransom presided. Grace by Chaplain Hagar. 

Supper over, the opening address was delivered by Major Cunningham, 
of which the following is a part: 

"No person rejoiced more than I when the long-looked-for time of peace 
came and with it the homeward march of our regiment. Yet I felt somewhat 
sad when the parting came. It seemed like the breaking up of a family with 
its ties of affection strenuously tested through years of trying experience. 

"I resolved to try and keep alive this friendship, continue these fraternal 
relations, and it was in furtherance of this resolution that I called you together 
last fall, and it was for this purpose that the 'Association of the Adirondack 
Regiment' is formed. . . . 

"Isn't it a delightful fact that after military obligations and distinctions 
have been thrown aside, and all returned to the level of civil life, we so 
love to meet each other, with nothing of the past to mar, and so much to 
make us grasp the hand of every comrade with such a mutual hearty good- 
will as to send the blood rushing back to the heart laden with the vigor and 
fragrance of an active and sincere comradeship? 

"To continue this is the mission of our association. We seek no extrinsic 
benefits by coming together; ask no favors backed by the united deserts of 
brave comrades; no glory other than has already been accorded to the USth. 
Neither do we desire to perpetuate recollections of the 'pomp and circumstance 
of war' — the glory scenes of strife and danger which we have been permitted 
to survive. History will preserve the facts of South Anna, Drury's Bluff. 
Cold Harbor, Swift Creek, Petersburg Heights, Fort Harrison, the final 
occupation of the enemy's capitol; but it is for us, by reunions such as this, 
to preserve from forgetfulness comrades who have blest our weary service. . . . 

"We have taken the anniversary of our muster into the U. S. service as 
reunion day, and we meet to-night 'mid the scenes of our first acquaintance, 
near the very spot hallowed by earlier historical events, where five years ago 
a long line with uncovered heads and right arms raised towards Heaven 
swore fealty to our then endangered government; and if to-night we feel 
the happy consciousness of having discharged that obligation, we may with 
all modesty pride ourselves upon it. 

''Here, too, where, three years later, with a smaller number, but older 
and more experienced, we returned, bearing our record in the dearly bought 
inscriptions upon our tattered banners. Here we separated, and here we are 
gathered again, and may we be spared to meet in future years and 

Sing our pleasures, hopes and joys 

In some mild sphere, 
Still closer knit in friendship's ties 

Each passing year. 

"Yes, like the grand old mountains whose name we bore, though each 
individual peak be ever so distinct and lofty, yet ;t!l Mend at their base in 
one common foundation; so may we, though ever so separated by distance, be 
linked together by the enduring ties of a peculiar brotherhood." 

Feeling letters of regret were rejd by Major Cunningham, from Brigadier 



i 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 199 

General S. T. Richards, Brevet-Brigadier General G. F. Nichols, Colonel O. 
Keese, Captain Livingston, Lieutenant Garrett, Lieutenant Vaughan, Major 
General G. J. Stannard, Brevet-Brigadier General Ripley, Hon. R. S. Hale, 
Hon. O. Ferris and Hon. S. M. Weed. 

The following toasts were then offered and responded to: 

1. Our Absent Comrades: Sacred is the memory of the noble dead and dear 
the recollection of their service. May no absence be mourned at the final reunion 
on high. 

Responded to by Chaplain Hagar, who, in part, said: 

"Perhaps I am called upon in this relation, because I was accustomed 
during the years of our service to speak for them in leading their devotions 
in the hour of worship, and because it was my sad duty to repeat for some of 
them to loving ones the words breathed into my ear in their last moments. 

"One evening when our regiment had been relieved in the trenches in front 
of Petersburg, and had returned to camp in that ravine which we all re- 
member, a number of you were seated in front of your tents. Perhaps you 
were thinking of home,, perhaps watching the shells from the mortar batteries 
crossing each other to and from the enemy, or especially regarding some rifle- 
gun whose shot was more directly towards ourselves. One of our number 
sung a few verses winch never before seemed so impressive. This is one of 

the verses: 

'Tis sweet to be remembered 

In the turmoils of this life, 

While toiling up its pathway, 

While mingling in its strife, 

While, wandering o'er earth's border, 

Or sailing on the sea, 

'Tis sweet to be remembered 

Wherever we may be. 

"The singer of that evening is thousands of miles away from us to-night, 
but he is not forgotten. Comrades of our camp fires, of long marches, ex- 
posures to pelting storms and burning heat, of many a fiercely contested field, 
though many are absent from our festive gathering to-night, they are not 
forgotten — never can be forgotten. 

" Oh, the sacrifice of noble lives to save our land, the richness of the offering! 
Honored be the names of the patriot dead; green be the memory of the de- 
parted. One went down to an ocean bed, others were laid in soldiers' graves 
at Suffolk, Drury's Bluff, Fort Harrison, Cold Harbor, Fair Oaks and other 
fields, in quiet cemeteries in the South, or gathered to their fathers at home. 
We cannot forget them, and above all let us not forget the Captain of our 
Salvation, and in the great final reunion may we all rejoice in His love and 
mercy." 

Music — Dirge by the orchestra. 

2. Our Country — 

Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, 
Our faith triumphant o'er our fears, 
Are all with thee. 

Music — Hail Columbia. 



200 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Ovr Regimental District — Hallowed from the Canadian frontier to the Hudson 
by historical reminiscences, marked with the still visible footprints of our patriot 
fathers; her late record is worthy its class-ic past; the sans perpetuate what the 
fathers founded. 

Responded to by Hon. Monroe Hall: 

"Our toast is 'Our Regimental District' composed ■ of the Counties of 
Clinton, Essex and Warren; worthy district, worthily represented by patriotic 
soldiers. Its limits coextensive with the Adirondack range, its character 
fully indicated by her rocky ramparts — your name — 'Adirondack.' was 
fitly chosen and honored in the choosing. 

"Truly this district is historically hallowed. We have Chippewa, Lundy's 
Lane, Plattsburgh, Crown Point, Ticonderoga and Lake George, and all 
through it are the still visible footprints of historic and heroic valor. We 
see them in our very midst; within a stone's throw are the entrenchments 
marks of the bullet and the imbedded cannon ball; Ticonderoga where Ethan 
Allen proclaimed his authority to be 'the Great Jehovah and the Continental 
Congress,' words which shadowed forth the principles upon which our Republic 
is founded, viz.: 'God's law as interpreted by Congress.' Hereabout raged 
the war between French and Indians, the French and English, and later still 
in the contest of the Revolution, and that of 1812, when as feeble colonies 
and a youthful nation, we contended successfully right here in Plattsburgh. 

"As our fathers were successful, so have been their sons. You have met 
the enemy on his own ground and conquered gloriously. You left the field, 
the shop, the office and the various vocations of life, and showed that the 
citizen soldiers, enlightened American soldiers, are equal to any emergency. 
Thus have you already proved and thus may you hereafter show a record 
truly worthy of the classic past, and thus will the noble sons of noble sires 
perpetuate what their fathers founded." 

Music — America, all rising and joined in singing. 

3. Plattsburgh — A national Watchword of victory on land and sea; the 
Alpha and Omega of ovr soldier life; may the as/tes of her present adversity 
stimulate her future prosperity. 

Responded to by A. W. Lansing, editor of the Sentinel. 

His first impression was that the toast was rather a dry one, having in 
mind the empty condition of the mill-pond and cisterns on the night of our 
late fire. But on reflection, the subject enlarged. The historic ground of 
Plattsburgh was a fitting place for a meeting of this kind, and without review- 
ing at length her history, he would point to the old Academy, riddled with 
bullets, as a still remaining evidence that Plattsburgh had seen war at her 
very doors. 

4. Our Corps Associates — Comrades of marches many; comrades of battles 
many; friends in storm, friends in calm — we lore them all. 

Feelingly responded to by General Cullen, late Colonel 96th X. Y. Volun- 
teers, in a brief but forceful speech, of which we have no memorandum. 

5. The 118th New York Volunteers — Though not without its record in 
the annals of the war, its noblest record is in the hearts of its numbers, graven by 
mutual respect and esteem. Its officers were men, all gentlemen, soldiers o/.'J 
patriots. 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 201 

This sentiment was received from Captain Livingston, and responded to 
by Captain James H. Pierce, who, in part, said: 

"1 believe that this occasion is one of pleasure to you all. and especially 
so to the surviving officers of our regiment; pleasing, in having participated 
in and survived the terrible conflagration that swept over our fair land; 
pleasing, because the Son of Righteousness directed our purposes, led us 
through the troubled waters and fixed our hopes upoll the solid rock of justice 
and liberty to all men; pleasing, that we are living to greet each other as 
brothers in peace, brothers in our faith in the institutions of our country. 

''When we come together from all parts of this Congressional District to 
celebrate our Reunion, we would baptize ourselves anew in the spirit of 
patriotism and loyalty; renew our loyalty to principle, loyalty to government, 
loyalty to God. We would dig from the ashes of our old camp fires the coals 
that have retained their heat and life, and fan them into blaze and brightness. 
In a word, we would say to our country and to the enemies of Republican 
government everywhere, that with the members of this association, fealty 
to our country is fealty to God. 

"We have reason to rejoice; but there are things to make us sad. Rejoice 
that the government lives; rejoice that our institutions survive; rejoice that 
the great principles of democratic government remain; rejoice that Providence 
kept us and permitted us to witness the successful restoration of the authority 
of the government, North and South. 

"Why should we be sad? It is because so many of our comrades are sleep- 
ing in the dust, a sacrifice for their country. It is that Major Pruyn, Captain 
Stone, Lieutenants Riggs, Reynolds, Wing, Stevenson, and others cannot 
be with us, under the flag they died to defend. 

"With the active duties of war passed, the important duty of citizens 
comes — to educate ourselves, our associates and our children to the sublime 
fact that governments should be administered for the happiness, equal privi- 
leges and justice to all, that obedience to government and law is our sacred 
duty. May we prove thoughtful, worthy, loyal citizens, preserving and 
glorifying what has been saved." 

o. Our Abserit Association Comrades, and especially, may we never again 
hare to regret the absence of our genial, scar-seared, Grand Old Captain Livingston. 

Singing — Auld Lang Syne. 

7. The Ladies: They cheered our departure, inspired our service and wel- 
comed us home. Any service is a pleasure when their approving smiles reward. 

responded to by Captain Brydon and Chaplain Hagar. Captain Brydon 
said in part: 

"In looking around this pleasant gathering I notice kind, familiar faces of 
women who have shared the experiences of our 'old camp ground'; and, 
alas! who have also exporiencedin hospitals the after-horrors of battle: whose 
gentle hands and words have soothed the sufferings of many of our sick and 
wounded; and, gentlemen, it is my conviction, and I believe yours, that one 
: kindly touch from a good and true woman was worth more than all the quinine 
and 'blue mass' administered by our highly esteemed Doctors." 

S. Our Old Rtginient'.d Mess — A fcasl of fellowship and flow of soul — 
that** all! 



202 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

Responded to by Lieutenant Mattoon — something like this: 

" We called our mess Slogan's mess,' and to give you an idea of it, we 
shall have to take out all these dishes, these eatables, the tables, the napery; 
take away the chairs and put down rails covered with soldiers' blankets. 
Around such a sort of table imagine our being cooked for and waited on by 
the untidiest Hogan in the world, with unwashed face and a piece of an old 
gunny bag for an apron. Such was our mess. What a mess! It was about 
such a mess as I got into the other day when my wife was away from home. 
I had to get dinner for myself. I had chicken, corn, potatoes, etc., and I 
boiled them all in one pot and Hogan-like I spoiled them all. 

"Well, we had to put up with Hogan and his greasy self and apron. Now 
if you can so stretch your imaginations as to imagine all these things and a 
hungry group of officers sitting around on old boxes, fence rails or pieces of 
boards on end, then you will have some idea of our mess. 

"If any of you should ever get into any such a mess, please remember 
that, who loudest yells and curses worst, gets most to eat and gets it first! " 

Major Cunningham read a humorous travesty on "Hogan's Mess" which 
provoked much merriment, giving laughable inside views of that unique 
regimental feature. 

Captain Dobie read humorous " Chronicals " of the USth. 

The Association adjourned to the parlors where a buzz of conversation 
indicated that the reunion continued with enjoyable interest. 



When the time for the next reunion came, business and other 
things, showing that we were all busily engaged in civil affairs. 
prevented expectation of the attendance of enough to make 
an interesting meeting and it was abandoned and never afterwards 
undertaken. The physical condition of Captain Livingston and 
his death, together with the constant business demands upon my 
own time, prevented any serious undertaking of a history of the 
regiment, for which we were made a committee. . 

After our regiment was disbanded it was a bit difficult to adjust 
myself to civil life and I did not hurry about it. 

In November I decided to go to niy uncle's law office, Warrens- 
burgh, where I could use his law library to read up and prepare 
to again take up the practice of law — my three years out-of- 
practice gave a sense of the need of study. I not only read, but 
entered upon such practice as offered and enjoyed my stay in 
Warrensburgh and its people very much, and an "unexpectedness'' 
made my stay longer than intended. 

In midsummer of 1866, I was asked by our Captain Parmerter, 
then U. S. Customs Collector at Pittsburgh, to go to Washington 
and find out what was going on in behalf of a rumored effort 




Lieutenant 
WILLIAM H. STEVENSON 







Lieutenant 
SAM SHERMAN 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 203 

for his removal from office; At Washington I found several army 

friends including!; Generals Charles K. Graham of New York and 
Gordon Granger, then hailing from New Orleans. Graham was 
seeking the appointment of Surveyor of the Port of New York 
and Granger the appointment -of Collector for the Port of New 
Orleans. Graham was successful and 1 believe Granger also 
succeeded. 

I called on Secretary of the Treasury, Hugh McCulloch (ap- 
pointed by President Lincoln and continued by President Johnson), ■ 

and frankly told him what I was there for; that I would like such 

* ... 

information as he was willing to give as to what, if anything, 

was being done towards the removal of Captain Parmerter. He 
said he was willing to tell all there was of it, and sent for the 
papers. It appeared that prominent Democrats of Northern 
New York had written Democratic Congressmen, in substance, 
that they understood that some Republicans were trying to re- 
move Captain Parmerter to make place for some other Republican; 
that these Democrats wanted Parmerter continued in office 
because the Democrats could ''use" him, etc. The Democratic 
Congressmen receiving these letters, confidentially (?) showed 
them to New York Republican Congressmen and this stirred the 
latter to the purpose of removing a Republican office-holder 
whom the Democrats could "use." It was all a transparent po- 
litical trick to oust Captain Parmerter and have it done by his 
own party. 

Secretary -McCulloch was frank and friendly and said I might 
assure Captain Parmerter that until there was good reason for 
removing him, he was safe. As I was leaving he followed me to 
the door, saying that he not only wouldn't remove a reputable 
and competent Civil War veteran without the best of reasons, 
but that such war service would influence him in making appoint- 
ments. With a hearty good-by handshake I left with a big 
liking for Secretary McCulloch. 

At the hotel I told Generals Graham and Granger what the 
Secretary said, which cheered them very much. They considered 
what the Secretary said as an invitation to ask for some appoint- 
ment and that I was foolish if I did not do so. 1 said that I knew 
of no appointment that 1 wanted. They had all sorts of informa- 
tion concerning government offices and office-holders and came 
to me that evening with information concerning the Internal 
Revenue CoHeetorship of my then 16th Congressional District, 
comprising Clinton. Essex and Warren Counties, which was also 
our regimental district. It was a remunerative office with large 



204 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

collections and in my need of income it was an alluring proposi- 
tion. I asked these Generals if they would go with me to the 
Secretary of the Treasury and "back me." They said they would ; 
but the next day they gave some excuse for not going then, and 
I decided I would go "all by my own self." I did so and frankly 
stated to Secretary McCulloch why I was back; that because of 
what he said to me about the appointment of those who had 
served in the war, and encouraged by my friends at the hotel, 
I would like the appointment of Collector of Internal Revenue 
for my congressional district; but desired him to be frank with 
me and if he could give no encouragement to say so and that 
would be the end of it. 

He received me kindly and said he would look up the situation 
as to the office and sent for the papers. After looking the package 
over he asked me if I knew Mr. Walter A. Faxon, the then col- 
lector. I replied that I did not and did not know that there was 
such an office until two days before. He proceeded to say that 
Mr. Faxon was a member of the New York Assembly when Ira 
Harris was made U. S. Senator; that Mr. Faxon voted for Mr. 
Harris and that Mr. Faxon's appointment might be considered a 
sort of reward. The Secretary then laid aside the papers, settled 
back in his chair and sort of looked me over and finally said that 
Mr. Faxon had been collector for some time and being somewhat 
impressed with my unique application, he would say, that having 
only a first-sight knowledge of me if I would send him just a few 
letters from prominent citizens of my congressional district, "no 
matter what their politics or creed," assuring him that I was 
competent, of good reputation at home and that my appointment 
would not be objectionable to my Congressman or people of the 
district, he would recommend my appointment to the President. 

"Now, young man," said he, "don't spend any money or time 
by coming here or in securing political or other approval or in- 
fluence; do not put yourself under any special obligation to any 
one." I was with him perhaps for an hour and when I left he 
said he was pleased to have met me, and that he had no doubt 
of my appointment or that I would administer the office all right. 

The letters were sent and in due time my appointment came. 

My appointment needed the confirmation of the United States 
Senate to continue me in office beyond the next session of Congress. 
Ex-Governor, Senator Morgan was Chairman of the Senate 
Committee before whom my appointment would go, and he wrote 
me in January, lSt>7, that he would do all lie could for my con- 
firmation. However, the political feeling against President 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 205 

Johnson grew in intensity during that congressional session so 
as to threaten wholesale opposition to the confirmation of any 
of his appointments made during the congressional recess. To- 
wards the last of February Senator Morgan wrote me that he 
was confident that such would be the case, and while he would be 
glad to have me confirmed, there were reasons why he would like 
to be released from his distinct promise; so I returned his letter 
containing that promise, with thanks. 

I then went to Washington and saw Senator Morgan, who re- 
peated that the feeling had become so strong against the President 
that none of his ad interim appointments would be confirmed, 
no matter how worthy any might be. It then seemed to me 
best to try and secure the appointment of some friend and I 
decided to try for the appointment of Col. Samuel T. Richards 
of Warrensburgh. I tried to see our Congressman, Robert S. 
Hale, but he was not in Washington at the time. I was sure, 
however, that he would favor Colonel Richards. 

I went to Secretary McCulloch and told the whole story and 
what I wanted him to do. He said that with the approval of 
Congressman Hale he would be pleased to appoint Colonel 
Richards. He asked me whether Colonel Richards was seeking 
the appointment and I told him that Richards knew nothing 
whatever about it; that he was the first colonel of my regiment, 
was prominent, reputable, etc. He said, "All right, I will be glad 
to help you out." 

In the meantime a quiet but influential effort was made to 
secure the appointment of a prominent politician of our district, 
which was thought successful by those interested. However, 
during the very last moment of that Congress a multitude of 
new appointments were confirmed en masse, including that of 
Colonel Richards. 

There were other interesting incidents and circumstances in- 
volved in this appointment and confirmation which I will not 
now speak of. 

I was made Colonel Richards' first deputy and had full charge 
of the office until the reduction of internal revenue taxes rendered 
the office less remunerative. 

I have mentioned this episode because of its peculiar and unique 
circumstances, the frank and kindly favor of Secretary Hugh 
McCulloch, and because I consider it a "consequence" of my 
war service. When .McCulloch came back to the Treasury De- 
partment in the Cabinet of President Arthur, I wrote him my 
congratulations, mentioning that he might not remember me as 



206 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

the subject of his official and personal favor during his previous 
incumbency. He replied that he did remember "the pleasant 
absence of red tape pertaining to our acquaintance." 

So it was that a trip to Washington in behalf of my comrade 
and friend, Captain Parmerter, occasioned the "handing out" 
to me of an honorable, pleasant and fairly compensated employ- 
ment for a period when I needed it. 

I had done all the work of the Collector's office, clerical and 
other, and found that my health had become somewhat impaired, 
and while I was thinking of taking a little recuperative travel- 
trip, a thing occurred which unexpectedly changed and determined 
the work of my after-life. 

Judge Brown, one of my best friends and an important factor 
in the Glens Falls Insurance Company from its organization until 
his death in 1897, sent for me. He said the Company was con- 
sidering the employment of additional help for field work and he 
believed I could be useful to the Company; that the Company 
had considered the question of liquidation and that the board of 
directors was about equally divided on the subject, and some who 
opposed it did so more from pride than judgment. The Company's 
net surplus had reached more than 8100,000, but had dwindled 
to about one-half that sum. He wished, for himself, that I would 
favorably consider the matter; that in taking this outside work 
I could gather information pertinent to the Company's outlook 
and prospects for the future and help settle the matter of whether 
the Company should go on, and that I would, for myself, get 
valuable experience. Without discussing the things which in- 
fluenced my decision, I consented to try it for the few remaining 
months of the year. ■ To my surprise I liked the work; it proved 
more interesting and important than I thought. I found that 
the Company, wherever at all known, had an excellent reputation 
and enjoyed the decided confidence of its agents and patrons — 
in fact its founder and active president, Russell M. Little, had 
imparted to the Company his own enthusiastic, honorable and 
manly character. The Company was financially small, but all 
companies were small then; the gross assets of the 10S joint- 
stock New York State fire insurance companies then footed about 
833,000,000, an average of some S300,000 each. The Company's 
business was also small and confined to a small territory. 

I grew quite enthusiastic concerning (he business and the 
Company and believed that a prudent extension of territory. 
an increase of agencies in territory already occupied and accept- 
ing an enlarged class of hazards promised profitable growth, and 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 207 

my reasons for this belief were given to the Company's board of 
directors. 

President Little was especially gratified and insisted that I 
abandon all other plans and continue in the Company's service. 
Without really deciding to do so, that is what I did, serving in 
its office and "on the road" for nearly three years, as Secretary 
for twenty-three years and as President twenty-two years. 

A small volume might be written of and concerning the varied 
and interesting experiences of this nearly a full half century, but 
I will not undertake it — not now. I will say that it brought me 
into touch and association with men of the finest personality, 
character and ability not only those connected with the Glexs 
Falls, but those in the great business of fire insurance throughout 
the country; it also brought me some esteemed friends in foreign 
parts. I have surely been favored with an extensive and delightful 
acquaintance with underwriters — agents, field men. officers and 
managers, through the years; men worth knowing; honorable, 
high-minded, broad-minded gentlemen, almost altogether the 
kind they should be to care for such a diversity of vast aggregate 
interests and capital. 

I couldn't have asked for a more satisfactory life-work than 
has come, to me, even though larger results might be wished. 

So it was that these incidental happenings pleasantly ''de- 
toured" my plans and were distinctly influenced by my service 
with the Adirondack Regiment. 

Early in General Grant's second campaign for the presidency, 
he, Mrs. Grant, Generals Sheridan and Babcock, Fred Grant and 
others made a trip to the St. Lawrence for an outing. 

One morning I received a telegram from General Moffitt of 
Pittsburgh, saying that the distinguished party were there the 
night before and would be at the Fort William Henry Hotel, Lake 
George, that night and that he thought some of the Glens Falls 
people might like to call on them. I showed the telegram to our 
President Little; he said he would like to go and we began to 
arrange for a party to go to Lake George that evening. 

A little later Air. Little came to me saying that lie believed 
we could get President Grant and party to stop over in Glens Falls 
for the next day and suggested that I drive to Lake George right 
away — then no. railroad or trolley cars to the Lake — take the 
afternoon boat and meet the steamer with Grant on board and 
secure the presence of the party in Glens Falls for the next day. 

I reminded him that the newspapers had announced thai the 
President and his party would spend next day in Saratoga Springs, 



20S THREE YEARS WITH THE 

then in the height of its season, and J. had no belief that that ar- 
rangement could be successfully interfered with: that probably 
quite every state in the Union was represented there then and 
Glens Falls would have poor comparative attractions for the 
presidential party. 

Mr. Little said I lacked faith and if I wouldn't undertake the 
matter he would, and he did. Pie found the President in the pilot 
house of the steamer and immediately communicated his invita- 
tion in behalf of Glens Falls for the morrow. The President replied 
that he would have to consult General Babcock who knew what 
the program for the party was. Babcock was sent for and said 
that beyond staying at the Fort William Henry that night and 
reaching the night steamer for New York the next evening at 
Albany, there were no engagements. It seems Saratoga Springs 
took the visit there as a matter of course. Grant then said that 
he did not know where Glens Falls was, but if the}' could spend 
the next day there and reach the Albany steamer in time, he would 
be pleased to do so. Just before landing at the Fort William Henry, 
Mr. Little said to President Grant: "I understand that you and 
your party will be the guests of Glens Falls to-morrow? ,, He 
replied, ''That is what I said." Mr. Little told him that carriages 
would be sent for the party in the morning. 

Mr. Little telegraphed of his success, advising to send the news 
out in all directions, which was done by wire and by messengers. 

That night we had a meeting of citizens to make some arrange- 
ments for the reception of our expected guests. 

At noon of that day a Saratoga Springs Committee dined at 
Glens Falls and later in the day took a carriage for Lake George 
to meet the Grant party and escort them to Saratoga. After the 
presidential party had had dinner at Lake George the Saratoga 
Committee called on the President and were astonished to learn 
of the Glens Falls arrangement. In spite of their pressing good 
reasons why the presidential candidate for reelection should 
go to Saratoga, they utterly failed to effect any change in the 
program. 

In the morning Mr. Little went to Lake George with two four- 
horse carriages — four white horses and four bays. 

A cannon was placed just outside the village on the Lake George 
road and when the party was signaled from Miller Hill, the cannon 
boomed and the bells and whistles of the village made all the noise 
possible. The town was crowded with people whose 1 cheers greeted 
the party as they passed through to the Rockwell House. 

Here I made a small welcome "talk"' to which General Grant 



J ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 209 

| 

responded as follows: "Colonel, I thank you and your people for 

this welcome. I was told that Glens Falls was a small town, 

but from the people I have seen it must be quite a city. I thank 

you." 

A reception was held in the hotel parlors for Grant and Sheridan, 
and in the ladies' parlor for Mrs. Grant. 

All the party were red-faced from sunburn, the skin on Grant's 
nose really ragged from peeling. They had been very much out 
of doors in the sun. 

After the reception I went with the President to his room and 
suggested that likely he would prefer to be left alone until dinner. 
He promptly said, "No, sit down and have a smoke." I tried one 
of his cigars, which proved too strong for me to finish. 

To go back a little. I was Chairman of our Republican County 
Committee at that time and as W. W. Rockwell, a prominent 
Republican, afterwards State Senator, was "out" for Greeley, 
and as a few other Republicans seemed so inclined, we were con- 
cerned as to how much Greeley sentiment there might be or 
become among Republicans. 

Note. Mr. Rockwell who opposed Grant in this campaign, by his support 
of Greeley, was a delegate to the next Republican National Convention and 
was of the "immortal 304" who, led by Senator Conkling, voted to the last 
for Grant's nomination for a third term. 

It was decided that a mass meeting should be held as early as 
possible to check any growth in the Greeley direction. It was 
also thought important to have the most influential speaker for 
the occasion that we could get, and Senator Conkling was the 
man we wanted. 

I had written the Chairman of the State Committee, Alonzo 
Cornell, asking for Mr. Conkling. He replied that it couldn't 
be, that the Senator would make but few speeches in the state 
and must go to the large cities, but we could have any other speaker 
on the list. 

I wrote again, urging our peculiar situation and the importance 
of making no mistake in our speaker, and that we wanted Conkling. 
I received a rather curt reply, in substance thai we were unreason- 
able and must be told that we could not have Senator Conkling. 
This letter was received a couple of days before Grant's coming. 

I mentioned this matter briefly to President Grant and said 
that I wanted his permission to telegraph Chairman Cornell that 
he believed it would be well to have the Senator come. He replied: 
"I think it would be well to have the Senator speak any where. 1 ' 
I continued to press my request and submit ted this written-out 



210 THREE YEARS WITH THE 

form of telegram to State Chairman Cornell, afterwards governor 
of the state. 

" President Grant and party are our guests to-day and he permits 
me to say that he thinks it would be well to have Senator Conkling 
speak in Glens Falls." 

Grant said he had no objections to that form and hoped it 
would bring the Senator. 

The telegram was sent and this reply came quite promptly: 
"My compliments to the President. You can have Senator Conk- 
ling if you will give him such a reception as he deserves. Will 
wire date in the morning." 

I immediately answered : " Thank you. Conditions satisfactory.'' 

I showed Cornell's telegram to the President and it drew out 
this eloquent response — "Good!"' 

General Sheridan was quite lively and sociable, mixing readily 
with the crowd, which constant l} r surrounded him, as if he thor- 
oughly enjoyed ji,.. ^. 

General Babcock'said he felt somewhat at home, having in his 
young manhood been principal of Warrensburgh Academy. 

Fred Grant was little more than a boy, on the edge of manhood, 
and was modestly retiring and quiet. 

Our ladies were pleased with Mrs. Grant's amiability. She 
certainly was a pleasant lady to meet. 

The Saratoga Committee arranged for a special train to Saratoga 
for a little earlier than the regular train and thus secured the 
party at Saratoga for an hour. 

I rode from the Rockwell House to the station with Grant, 
Sheridan and Fred Grant. As we went slowly down Warren 
Street,' crowds of people on each side, a lady threw a bouquet 
from a passing carriage into ours. I picked it up and offered it 
to Grant, but he said: "That's meant for Sheridan, he is our 
ladies' man," and Sheridan took it. 

An old-fashioned buekboard. with three intoxicated men in its 
single seat, the swaying, sagging board bending almost to the 
ground, drove alongside and the driver shouted: "Hello Old 
Grant! we ain't going to vote for yer." I started to say something 
to smooth the rough, drunken remark, when Sheridan hit my feet 
with his and made a gesture for me to say nothing. 

After a little, Grant said: "Sheridan, did you ever ride in one of 
these buckboards?" Sheridan replied that he never had. " I 
did last summer in Pennsylvania," continued Grant, "and found 
them a very easy-riding conveyance — they so readily accommo- 
date themselves to a rough road and to their load." "Yes," said 




Lieutenant 
JAMES S. GARRETT 



..A. 




Lieutenant 
EDGAR M. WING 



ADIRONDACK REGIMENT 211 -i^M 

• 
Sheridan, "I see — that buckboard seems just as drunk as its 
load is." 

It was a great day for Glens Falls and an altogether pleasant 
ovation to its guests, and to the credit of Mr. Little who brought 
it about. 

One dark, rainy evening about a year later Judge Ferris and 
I were conversing on the Rockwell House piazza when a very 
much closed carriage drove up. The bell-boy went to the carriage 
and coining back reported that a man in the carriage said he was 
Mr. Giant and wished to speak to some Glens Falls citizen. 
The boy said he told them who was on the piazza and ''the man 
said to ask them to please come to the carriage." We thought it 
some joke, but raised our umbrellas and went. It was indeed 
the President of the United States driving from Lake George to 
Saratoga Springs. He said: "I did not wish to pass through 
Glens Falls without trying to mention my remembrance of my 
visit last year and repeat my thanks for the pleasure of that day." 
There was some further commonplace conversation and the 
carriage went on. 

There were two other men in the carriage with the President. 
We remarked upon the "unroyal" and democratic way in which 
our Chief Magistrate was traveling. 

On his ride to Saratoga that night he would pass close up to 
the foot of Mount McGregor on whose top he was to make his 
brave but losing fight for life. 

I called on General Giant soon after he came to Mount McGregor 
— a brief call, for even then he was very feeble. As Glens Falls, 
eight miles away, was distinctly visible from Mount McGregor, 
it may be that, in looking towards our city, he may have been 
reminded of his day with us, then in the happiness of robust 
health. 

The last time I saw General Grant was a few days before his 
death. I went to call on him, but only had a sight of him in an 
invalid's chair on his cottage porch, wrapped in a blanket and 
Hearing his "Unconditional Surrender." 



ABARE, CHARLES T. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru: private, 
Co. K, Aug. 14, '62; appointed drummer, Aug. 30, '02; returned to com- 
pany as private, no date; mustered out with company. 

ABARE, PETER. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 2(3, '62. at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; died of typhoid fever, Jan. 10, '03, at Fort Ethan 
Alien, Va. 

ABARE, WTLBER L. Age, 21. Enlisted. July 26, '02, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, June 30, '04, near Petersburg; corporal, 
no date; mustered out with company. 

ADAMS, HENRY J. Age, 22. Enrolled, July 21, '62, at Elizabeth town; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 20, '02; first sergeant, Aug. 29, '02; second lieutenant, 

213 



THE ADIRONDACK KEGD1ENT 

118th NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS 
INDIVIDUAL SERVICE-ROSTER. 1862-1865 

The following brief service record of each of the 1325 officers and men 
who served with the regiment, is mostly compiled from The Report of the 
Adjutant General of the State of New York (1900) after the large labor of going 
through the voluminous data of that office and of the U. S. War Depart- 
ment. Corrections have been made and, no doubt, errors remain; but the 
record is as complete as can be expected. 

A few names are likely incorrectly given, for there was carelessness in keep- 
ing company and regimental records. It will be observed that some were 
borne under two or more names, mostly from misspelling. 

The following dates and mentions should be in mind in considering other 
individual memoranda : 

1. All not otherwise noted, enlisted for three years. 

2. The regiment was officially mustered out at Richmond, Va., June 13, 
1SG5; so those mentioned as " mustered out with company," were out 
at that date, although final discharge was at Plattsburgh, June 26, 1805. 

3. Those whose term of enlistment had not expired — recruits received in 
the field — were transferred to the 90th X. Y. Vols. Infantry and con- 
tinued in service with that regiment. 

4. The Buttle of Drurv's Bluff was fought May 16, 1804. 

5. The Battle of Cold Harbor, June 1-3, 1864. 

6. The Battle of Fort Harrison — also called the Battle of Chapin's Farm 
— September 29-30, 1S04. 

7. The Second Fair Oaks affair occurred October 27, 1804. 

The experience of our regiment was, in a general way, the average experi- 
ence of other regiments, and a careful reading of these brief personal records 
will give an idea of what " happened " to the hundreds of thousands wtio 
served in the " War for the Union," with its awful aggregate of killed, wounded, 
dead from wounds and disease, missing and perishing in prison-pens and the 
few survivors — many of them crippled from wounds and war-contracted 
disease. We recommend such reading to the children and grandehildren of 
those who served, indeed to all — for all should have some realization of the 
fearful cost of a preserved United States of America. 



214 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

Co. G, Sept, 30, '63; first lieutenant. Co. A, May 19, '64; captain. Co. D, 
Sept. 16, '61; wounded, at Fort Harrison; discharged, to date, April 1), '05, 
to accept appointment as captain and commissary of subsistence of U. S. 
Volunteers. 

ALDRICH, LEWIS. Age. 18. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; killed, at Drury's Bluff. 

ALEXANDER, WILLIAM. Age, 36. Enlisted, July ' 28, '62, at Ellen- 
burgh; private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Co. H, Third Regiment, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 1, '65; mustered out, July 8, '65, at Hartford, 
Conn. 

ALLEN, DANIEL W. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Moriah; private 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; killed, at Fort Harrison. 

ALLEN, WILLIAM H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick, at Fort Monroe, at muster-out 
of company. 

ALLEN, JR., WILSON. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Ausable; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 4, '65. 

ALLORE, BOZZIEL. Age, 44. Enlisted, Dec. 26, '63, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Dec. 2S, '63; discharged, Aprils, '64; fraudulent enlistment. 

ALMOND, MICHAEL. Age. 23. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Champluin; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, at Fort Harrison; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. S, '65; also borne as Mitchell Almond. 

AMEL, CHARLES. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died in hospital, no date; also borne as Ammel. 

AMORE, JOHN. Age, IS. Enlisted at Wcstport, to serve one year; 
private, unassigned, Jan. 31, '65; no further record. 

ANDERSON, GEORGE H. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 13. '62, at Pitts- 
burgh; private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, May 12, '63, for pro- 
motion to first lieutenant, ^prague's Cavalry. 

ANDREWS, ADELBERT. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's BlufT, and supposed 
died in prison. 

ANDREWS, ALONZO. Age 23. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; appointed wagoner, and returned to company 
as private, no dates; mustered out with company. 

ANDREWS, HENRY. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; 
private. Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 19, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

ANGELL, JOHN W. Age, 24. Enrolled, Aug. 11, '62, at Moocrs; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; mustered in as second 
lieutenant, Feb. 15, '63; as first lieutenant, Co. D, June 21, '64; as captain, 
April 14, 'tio; mustered out with company. 

ANNIS, HENRY G. Age. 21. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company, as Henry J. 

ANNIS, JOSEPH. Age, 24. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private. Co. K, 
Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 25, '63, at Finley Hospital, 
Washington. 

ANSON, NELSON F. Age, 36. Enlisted. Dec. 17, '63, at Willsboro; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Dec. 21, '63; died of disease, Aug. 20, '64, at hospital; also 
borne as Nelson H. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 215 

ARIEL, WILLIAM W, Age, 18. EnHsted, July 2S, '62, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '(32; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled. Feb. 22, '05, at Rich- 
mond; discharged, June 17, '65, at hospital, Annapolis. 

ARMSTRONG, EDWARD H. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, 'G2, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; sergeant, Aug. 20, '62; returned to ranks; 
corporal, no dates; again returned to ranks and again corporal, no dates; 
discharged, July 7, "65, at Finley Hospital, Washington. 

ARMSTRONG, JOHN C. Age, IS. Enlisted, Nov. 5, '63. at Newcomb; 
private, Co. I, Jan. 5, '64; transferred to Co. C, Feb. 24, '64; to 96th 
Inf an try. 

ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM E. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 11. '62. at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

ARNOLD, CLARK. Age, 32. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at Queensbury: pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Co. I, First Regiment. Veteran 
Reserve Corps, at hospital, June 22, '64; discharged, July 3, *65, at Elrnira, 
N. Y. 

ARNOLD, ELI F. A^c, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '63, at Ausable; private, 
Co. C, Dec. 16, '63; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

ARNOLD, FLAVIUS J. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Ausable; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 23, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks and 
sergeant, no dotes; discharged, June 3, '65, at Richmond. 

ARNOLD, MYRON A. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 2. '62, at Ausable; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 15, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

ARNOLD, NORMAN H. Age, 28. Enrolled, Aug. 11. '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant and first 
sergeant, no date; second lieutenant, May 22, '65; mustered out with 
company. 

ARNOLD, NORMAN J. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, no date; sick in hospital at Hamp- 
ton, at muster-out of company. 

ARNOLD, STUTELEY B. Age, 23. Enlisted, Au£. 5. '62, at Ausable; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 15, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; died, May 8, '64, at 
Keeseville, N. Y.; also borne as Studley B. 

ARNOW, ANDREW. Ape, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I. Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 12, '63, at hospital, 
New York City; also borne as Annow and Armow. 

ASHLEY, SILAS. Age 18. Enlisted, Nov. 16, '63, at Plattsburgh; private. 
Co. I, Jan. 16, '6)4; captured at Drury's Bluff; paroled, no date; discharged 
for disability, March 29, '65, in the field. 

ASHLINE, SOLOMON. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; corporal. Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, no date; 
captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; discharged with detachment, 
June 13, '65, at Camp Parole, Annapolis. 

ATHERTON, EDWIN. Age, 23. Enlisted. July 30, '62, at Essex; private. 
Co. E, Aug. 29, '62; died of tvphoid fever, March 7, '03, at hospital, Fort 
Ethan Allen. 

ATHERTON, W r ILLIAM E. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Esse*; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 28, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

ATKINSON, JOHN. Age, 28. Enlisted at camp near Fort Ethan Alien, 
Va.; private, Co. E, Dec. 22, '62; transferred to 96th Infantry, 



216 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

ATKINSON, WILLARD. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 20, '62, at camp 
near Fort Ethan All-en. 

ATWELL, LAWRENCE O. Age, 34. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Mori ah; 

private, Co. F, Dec. 10, '03; discharged for disability, May 31, 'Go, at Man- 
chester, Va. 

AUSTIN, DAVID. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; died of chronic diarrhea, Sept. 30, '03, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe; also borne as Austen. 

AVERILL, WILLIAM P. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; deserted, May 14, '03, at Washington. 

AVERY, GEORGE W. Age, 18. Enlisted at Beekmantown, to serve three 
years: mustered in as private, Co. E, Dec. 28, '03; killed at Drurv's 
Bluff. 

AVERY, THOMAS. Age, 45. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. E, 
Dec. 17, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

AYERS, CHARLES. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; died of pernicious chills, Aug. 5, '03, at Gloucester 
Point, Va. 

BAILEY, GEORGE H. Age, 31. Enlisted, July 26, '02. at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; captured at Fair Oaks; reported to have died in prison 
at Salisbury, X. C. 

BAILEY, WILLIAM H. Age, 27. Enrolled, Aug. 12, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
captain, Co. H, Aug. 21, '02; discharged for disability, April, '04. 

BAKER, BENJAMIN. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02, at Horicen; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '02; mustered out with company as Benjamin L.; also 
borne as Benjamin S., and Boker. 

BAKER, CASPER W. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '02. at Ausable; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30. '62; wounded at Drurv's Bluff; corporal, no date; dis- 
charged for disability, March 22, '05, at Philadelphia. 

BAKER, HEMAN E. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, April 30, 05; mustered out with company. 

BAKER, JOHN D. Age. 29. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Ausable; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal and returned to ranks, no dates; corporal, 
Nov. 9, '03; sergeant, May 10, '04; mustered out with company. 

BAKER, WASHINGTON. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 23, '02, at Horicon; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, Jan. 12, '05; also 
borne as Boker. 

BALCOM, GEORGE W. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

BALDWIN, WALLACE W. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; discharged, June 20, '05, at Balfour Hos- 
pital, Portsmouth, Va. 

BALFOUR, JR., JOHN. Age, 28L Enlisted. Aug. 11, '02, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29. '02; killed in action at Drurv's Bluff. 

BANKER, BENJAMIN F. Age, 23? Enlisted. Aug. 11, '02, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, Sept., '04; sergeant, June 4, '05; 
mustered out with company. 

BANKER, GEORGE H. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died of disease, Nov. 13, '03, at hospital, David's 
Island, New York Harbor. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 217 

BANKER, GEORGE L. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 20, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 24, 'C4; also 
borne as George S. 

BANKER, JEFFERSON M. Age, IS. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. K, Nov. 27, '63; captured, no date; died, Aug. 13, '64, at Anderson- 
ville, Ga. 

BARBER, HENRY R. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 23, '62, at Beekmantown; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, March 26, '63, for promotion. 

BARBER, THOMAS. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, Jan. 10, '65; discharged, June 17, 
'65, at Albany, N. Y., from hospital, Troy, X. Y. 

BARBER, WILLIAM J. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Luzerne; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 7, '65, at Balfour Hospital, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

BARKER, AARON. Age, 38. Enlisted. July 29, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for dis- 
ability, March 20, '64. 

BARNEY, JOSEPH. Age, 44. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; also borne as Bainy and Bamy; no further record. 

BARRY, JOHN. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, no date; also borne as 
Barrey. 

BARTLETT, DANIELS S. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay: private. 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62: discharged for disability, Oct. 17, '63, at Mower Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, Pa., as Bartlette. 

BARTLETT, DAVID W. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at Bolton: private, 
Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62: discharged for disability, Dec. 
16, '62. 

BARTLETT, LEWIS. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Iloricon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; died of disease, Aug. 5, 
'64, at Andersonville, Ga. 

BARTON, LORENZO J. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 28. '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; died, Feb. 8, ? 65, at 
Salisbury, N. C. 

BARTON, WESLEY. Age, 20. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. E, 

Dec. 17, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 96th Infantry, while 

in hospital, sick. 
BASHAW, MOSES. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 27, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 

C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 
BATES, HIRAM B. Age,. 27. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 

Co. G, Aug. 22, '62; no further record. 
BATES, ROYAL. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Caldwell; private, 

Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 
BATTLES, HENRY. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Elizabethtown; 

private, Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; died of measles, Feb. 

15, '63,' at Fort Ethan Allen; also borne as Battels. 
BATTLES, JAMES W. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Black Brook; 

private. Co. K, Aug. 30. '62; deserted, April 14, '63, at Washington. 
BAXTER, ELISHA M. Age* 34. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Iloricon; private, 

Co. D, Aug. 21, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, April 2, 

'63; mustered out with company. 



218 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

BAXTER, JOHN. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at. Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 27, '65, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe. 

BECKWITH, WILLIAM H. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at Chazy: 
private, Co. B, Aug. 23, '62; discharged, June 4, '65; also borne as 
Beckworth. 

BEECH, LEWIS. Age, 44. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. I, Dec. 
15, '63; discharged, June 23, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe; also borne as 
Louis. 

BEEDE, ALMON O. Age, IS. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Keene; private. 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 21, '62, near Fort 
Ethan Allen, as Almond O. Beide. 

BEEDY, OREN E. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; died of wounds, Oct. 1, 
'64, on hospital steamer Hero of Jersey, at Bermuda Hundred; also borne 
as Orrin E. Beede. 

BEEDY, ORSON A. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died, April 1, '63, at hospital. Camp Adirondack, 
Washington; also borne as Orrison A. Beede and Beeds. 

BELDEN, ESAU. Age, 31. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Newcomb; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

BELL, EUGENE. Age, 21. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '63. at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Dec. 16, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff: transferred to Second 
Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, May 22. '65; discharged, Aug. 11, '65, 
at Washington, as of Co. A, Sth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. 

BELL, WILLIAM. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '62. at Mooers; private 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Sept. 3, '62, at New York City. 

BELONGA, JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. I, Dec 
22, '63; discharged, June 7, '65, at Portsmouth, Va., from Balfour Hos- 
pital; also borne as Blungy. 

BENNET, JOSEPH. Age. 21. Enlisted, Julv 22, '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, Sept. 21, '62, near Relay House, Md. 

BENNETT, CHARLES C. Age. 2S. Enlisted, July 17, '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Nov. '62, at hospital near Relay 
House, Md. 

BENNETT, EDGAR. Age, 19. Enlisted, Auec. 13. '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, Nov. 24, '64, at hospital, Fort Monroe; 
also borne as Burnett. 

BENNETT. ELAH. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died of typhoid fever, June 2. '64, at Hamp- 
ton Hospital. 

BENNETT, JEREMIAH. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private. Co. 1), Aug. 29, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Nov. 22, '63, at hos- 
pital, Fort Monroe. 

BENNETT, JOHN. Acp, 22. Enlisted. Aim. 14. '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged, Dec. 
26, '64, at hospital, Rochester, X. Y.; also borne as Burnett. 

BENNETT, JOHN H. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Warrcusburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, June 17, '64, while on furlough. 

BENNETT, JR., LEONARD. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aim. 13. '62, at Johns- 
burgh; private, Co. G.Aug. 22, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; first sergeant, 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER .219 

April 2."), '64; wounded in June, '04; returned to ranks, no date; died, 
Oet. 23, '04, at hospital. 

BENNETT, ROYAL Z. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 27, '02, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, "02; discharged for disability, Nov. 1, '04; also borne as 
Rogers Z. 

BENTLEY, LEMUEL. Age, 31. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '02, at Horicon; private. 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 29, '05, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe. 

BENTLY, JOSEPH C. Ace. 20. Enlisted, July 28, '02. at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, "02; wounded, no date; absent, sick in hospital, at muster- 
out of company; also borne as Bentley. 

BENWAY, FRANCIS. Age, 29. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '02. at Pittsburgh: 
private, Co. II, Aug. 30, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with 
company. 

EESWICK, JOHN. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Bolton; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; discharged, May 27, '05. 

BESWICK, NATFIAN. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Bolton: private, 
Co. C. Aug. 20, '02; transferred to Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; died, Nov. 11, '03, 
at Bolton, X. Y., while on furlough. 

BETTS, HENRY. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 31, '02, at Crown Point; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

BIDWELL, WILLIAM T. Age, 22. Enrolled, Aug. 22. '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 20, '02; hospital steward, Aug. 29, '02; second lieu- 
tenant, Co. E, May 22, '05; mustered out with company. 

BILLS, RICHARD. Age, 30. Enlisted, Dec. 17, '03, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Jan. 5, '04; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died, May 27, 
'04, at Richmond. 

BINNINGS, DANIEL S. Age, 30. Enlisted. Dec. 10. '03, at Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Dec. IS, '03; wounded at Cold Harbor; discharged, May 27. 
'05, at Satterlee Hospital, West Philadelphia; also borne as Daniel F. and 
N. Bennings. 

BLAIR, HORACE E. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '02, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 2S, '03. 

BLAKE, FRANKLIN. Age, IS: Enlisted at Peru; private, Co. II, Nov. 12, 
'03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

BLANCHARD, ALFRED J. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02, at North Hud- 
son: private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company; also borne 
as Alfred, Jr. 

BLANCHARD, NORMAN. Age, IS. Enlisted at Saranac; private, Co. A, 
Dee. 9, '03; discharged, June 0, '05, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

BLOOD, HENRY. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02. at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, no date; absent, sick, in hospital, Albany, 
N. Y., at muster-out of company. 

BLOOD, . Age, date, place of enlistment and muster-in as 

private, Co. I, not stated; on daily duty as company cook, April 30, '05; 
no further record. 

BOARDMAN, BELDEN N. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Elizabeth- 
town; private, Co. !•', Aim. 20, '02; discharged, June 19, '05, at Emory 
Hospital, Washington; also borne as Bordman. 



220 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

BOKAH, DAVID. Age, 19. Enlisted at Albany, to serve one year; private 
Co. E, April 6, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Botah. 

JBOLIA, LEWIS. Age, IS. Enlisted at Cbazv; private, Co. I, Jan. 4, '64; 
discharged for disability, May 22, '65, at Brattleboro, Vt.; also borne as 
Bolid. 

BOLTON, JOHN. Age, 18. Enlisted, Jury 29, '62, 'at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; died of disease, Dec. 28, '63. 

BOMYEA, GEORGE. Age, 28. Enlisted at Black Brook; private. Co. F, 
Dec. 17, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Bomy and Bo my a. 

BOMYEA, ROBERT. Age. 32. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. F, 
Dec. 17, '63; wounded at Cold Harbor; died of his wounds, at Carver 
Hospital, Washington, no date. 

BOWEN, JEREMIAH N. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 22, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, July 31, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; died, Dec. 9, '62. at 
•camp near Fort Ethan Allen; also borne as Jeremiah M. Bowm. 

BOWEN, TRUMAN D. Age, 29. Enlisted Aug. 11, '62, at Saranec; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; commissary sergeant, Dec. 24, '64; 
mustered out with regiment; also borne as Bourn and Bowrn. 

BOYD, ROBERT. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Bolton; private Co. 
G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, Sept. 2, '62; sergeant, Jan. 1, '65; mustered out 
with company. 

BOYNTON, JOHN S. Aire, 36. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. K, Aug. 21, '62; discharged, Feb. 29, '64. 

BRADY, JAMES. Age, 33. Enlisted, July 19, '62, at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

BRADY, SAMUEL H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '63, at Pittsburgh; 
private, unassigned, Dec. 16, '63; no further record. 

BRAINERD, CARLOS M. Age, 24. Enlisted,. July 28, '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 6, '62; appointed wagoner, Aug. 29, '62; promoted 
corporal, no date; captured in action at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; dis- 
charged, June 13, '65, at Camp Parole, Annapolis; also borne as Charles 
Brainard and Branard. 

BRALEY, DANIEL H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Ncwcomb; 
private. Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Dairy's BlurT; corporal, Jan. 31, 
'65; mustered out with company; also borne as Brailey. 

BRALEY, JAMES O. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Xewcomb; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30. '62; corporal, no date; wounded at Drury's Bluff; 
mustered out with company; also borne as Brady. 

BRALEY, SEWELL P. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Bolton; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with companv; also borne as Serriil P. 
Brady. 

BRAMAN, EGBERT A. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62. at Westport; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 16, '62; commissary sergeant, Aug. 29, '62: quarter- 
master-sergeant, Dec. 24, '64; mustered out with regiment. 

Commissioned, not mustered, second lieutenant, June 16, Wo. with rank 
from May 1, '65. 

.BREAH, DAVID. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died, July 21, '64, at 18th Army Corps Hospital; 
also borne as Break. 






INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 221 

BRESETT, JOSEPH. Ago, IS, Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with company as 
Brcsette. 

BRESSET, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 5, '63, at Chazy: private. 
Co. I, Dec. 22, '63; no record subsequent to April 30, '65; also borne as 
Bresette. 

BRISTOL, ISAAC S. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Jan. 7, '64, at Bal- 
four Hospital, Portsmouth. 

BR1TTELL, WILLIAM A. Age, 28. Enlisted, July 24, '62, at Elizabeth- 
town; private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, June 11, '63, at 
Regimental Hospital, Suffolk, Va.; also borne as William E. Bartlett, 
Britelle and Butelie. 

BRONSON, HARVEY D. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; corporal and sergeant, no dates; captured at Fair 
Oaks; paroled, no date; discharged, June 22, '65, at Albany, N. Y.; also 
borne as Brownson and Brunson. 

BROOKS, GASKER. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out, June 13, '65, at Campbell Hos- 
pital, Washington. 

BROTHERS, LEWIS. A<re, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

BROUNSE, EDWARD. Age, 33. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, April 15, '63, at 

Washington. 

BROWN, CALVIN. Age, 32. Enlisted, Sept. 27, '64, at Harrietstown, to 
serve one year; mustered in as private, Co. F, Oct. 7, '64; mustered out 
with company. 

BROWN, CARMI. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 27, '62. at Horiron; private, 
Co. D. Aug. 18, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; returned to ranks, April 2. '63; 
captured in action at Drury's Blufi'; died of disease, May 29, '64, at Rich- 
mond, Va.; also borne as Caramy and Carmine Brown. 

BROWN, DANIEL C. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62. at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; died, Sept. 1, '64, at An- 
dersonville, Ga. 

BROWN, ELIJAH J. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died, Aug. 23, '63, at Post Hospital, Gloucester Point, 
Va.; also borne as Elisha J. 

BROWN, ENOS. Ac;o, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Horicon: private, Co. 
D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 30, '65, at Albany, X. Y. 

BROWN, HENRY C. Ago, 19. Enlisted, Jan. 1, '64, at Bolton: private, 

I Co. D, Jan. 5, '64; corporal, no date; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

BROWN, HIRAM. Ago. 19. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62. at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drurv's Bluff. 

BROWN, JOEL. Ape, 23. Enlisted. Aim. 12. '62. at Horicon; private, Co. 

1), Aug, 29, '62; absent, supposed to be a prisoner of war; captured at 
Drury's Bluff and supposed died in prison. 

BROWN, ORLANDO J. Ago, 25. Enlisted. Aug. 5, '62. at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G. Aug. 22, '62: corporal. Aug. 30, '62; sergeant, May 16, 'til; 
\ discharged, June 6, '65, at Albany, X. V. 



222 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

BRUMAGIN, ANDREW J. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, 'G2; corporal and servant, no dates; 
wounded at Drury's Bluff; died of wounds, no date; also borne as Andrew 
Brumighim. 

BRUNELL, AMBROSE. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '02, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 10, '02; appointed wagoner, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for dis- 
ability, April 28, 'G3, at Post Hospital, Relay House, Md.; also borne as 
Brunnelle. 

BRYANT, GEORGE. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 2, '02, at Wilmington: 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

BRYANT, GEORGE F. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '03, at KiiiKsbury; 
private, Co. G. Dec. 21, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

BRYANT, LUTHER S. Age. 42. Enrolled, July 23, '02, at St. Armand; 
private. Co. C, Aug. 17, '02; sergeant, Aug. 29, '02; second lieutenant. 
Feb. 14, '03; first lieutenant. Oct. 15, '04; captured at Fair Oaks and 
paroled; mustered out with company. 

BRYDON, JOHN. Age, 20. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; second lieutenant, 
Co. E, Aug. 19, '02; first lieutenant, Jan. 29, '04; as captain, Co. K, June S, 
'64; mustered out with company. 

BUCKLEY, JEREMIAH. Age, 33. Enlisted at Peru; private, Co. G, 
Dec. 15, '03; killed. June 20, '04, at Petersburg. 

BULL, HIRAM M. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Hiram X. 

BULL, JEROME H. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; died of typhoid fever, Jan. 19, '03, at camp 
near Fort Ethan Allen; also borne as Jerome M. 

BULL, JONATHAN A. Age. 20. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '02, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

BULL, STEPHEN C. Age, 24. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '02, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 13, '02; corporal, Aug: 29, '02; sergeant, no date; absent, 
supposed prisoner of war, since Fair Oaks; probably died in prison. 

BULLION, ROYAL. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Oueensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; discharged with detachment, May 27. '05. at 
Satterlee Hospital, West Philadelphia. 

BULLIS, DAVID. Age, 19. Enlisted at Beekmantown; private, Co. G, 
Dec. 21. '03: captured at Drury's Bluff: died, June 5, '04, at Richmond; 
also borne as Bolice, Boolice and Buillice. 

BULLIS, EDWIN B. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private. Co. K, Aug. 19, '02; corporal. Aug. 21, '02; sergeant. May 10, '04. 
wounded at Cold Harbor; promoted first sergeant, April 30, 'ijo; mustered 
out with company. 

BULLIS, JOSEPHUS. Age, 27. Enlisted. Aug. 0. '02, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as Joseph 
Bulles. 

BULLIS, KINNES C. Age, 20. Enlisted. Aim. 22, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; discharged. May 19, '0)5, at hospital, Baltimore. 

BULLOCK, WILLIAM. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 17, '.02, at Qucensburv; 

private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '0)2; absent, in hospital. Fort Monroe, June 30, '05: 

no further record. 
BUNDY, LEWIS. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Mooers; private. Co. 

I, Aug. 29, V.2; corporal, no date: discharged for disability, May 11. '63, 

at hospital, Washington; also borne as Brundy. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 2*3 

BUNKER, SEWELL F. Aire, 29. Enlisted, Dec. 28, '03, at Bt Armand; 
private, Co. C, Dec. 29, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

BURBO, FRANCIS. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 10, '62, at Champlain: 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 9, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

BURGE, CYRUS O. Age, 39. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; discharged for disability, Nov. 20, '62; also borne as 
Berge. 

BURK, THOMAS. _ Age, IS. Enlisted. Aug. .11, '62. at Plattsbunrh: private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, June 4, '65; mustered out with company; 
also borne as Burke. 

BURK, WILLIAM S. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. S. '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; absent, missing at Dniry's Bluff, and at muster-out 
of company; also borne as Burke; wounded, captured and supposed died 
in prison. 

BURKE, PETER. Age, 33. Enlisted. July 26. '62, at Pittsburgh: private, 
Co. H, Aug. 10, '62; sergeant. Aug. 30, '62; first sergeant, no date; cap- 
tured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 1, '66; discharged, June 17, '65. at 
Camp Parole, Annapolis; also borne as Burk. 

BURKHART, ADOLPFIUS G. Age. 25. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Queens- 
bun,-; private. Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of rheumatism, Nov. S, '62, near 
Relay House, Md. 

BURNHAM, SIDNEY E. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 4. '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A. Aug. 10, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of 
dysentery. Aug. 15, '63, at Gloucester Point, Va. 

BURNS, GEORGE W. Age, 45. Enlisted, Dec. 16. '63. at Lewis: private. 
Co. E, Dec. 22, '63; wounded and captured at Dniry's Bluff: paroled, no 
date; died of typhoid fever, April IS, '65, at hospital, Camp Parole, 
Annapolis. 

BURT, ALVIN T. Age, 18. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62. at Moriah; private, Co. 

IF, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, March 15, '63; wounded, June 15. '64, at Peters- 
burg; died of his wounds, no date; also borne as Arlin Burt. 

BURT. DANIEL A. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 30. '62; died, Oct. 3, '63, at hospital, Yorktown, Ya. 

BURT, HIRAM. Age. 33. Enlisted, July 23, '62. at Schroon; private, Co. 
E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged. May 22, '65, at Norfolk. 

BURT, ORLANDO. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62. at Ticondcrog:' : 
private. Co. E. Aug. 30. '62: wounded, no date; discharged with detach- 
ment, June 3, '65, at Washington. 

BURZEE, CHARLES A. Ace, 25. Enlisted. Aug. 7. '62, at Schroon; private. 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; discharged for disability, May 31, 
'6.5, near Manchester, Ya.; also borne as Bunce and Buzzee. 

BUTRICK, GEORGE M. Age, 21. Enrolled at Plattsbunrh; second lieu- 
tenant, Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; discharged, Feb. 13, '63; also borne as Burtrick. 

CAFFRY, PATRICK. Age. IS. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Black Brook: pri- 
vate, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; ubsem, sick in hospital, since March, '64, and 
at muster-out of company. 

CALKINS, JOHN. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62. at Hague: private. Co. 
D, Aug. 29. '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; absent, sick in hospital, at 
muster-out of company. 



i ; 

224 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

CALKINS, JOHN H. Age, 25. Enrolled, July 30, '62, at Schuvler Falls; 
private, Co. II, Aug. 12, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '02; second lieutenant, 
Co. F, June 21, '64; transferred to Co. I, Oct. 24, '64; first lieutenant, 
Co. K, May 22, '65; mustered out with company. 

CAMPBELL, GEORGE F. Age, 24. Enrolled, July 20, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 20, '62; first lieutenant, 
March 17, '63; captain, Co. B, Oct. 15, '61; mustered out with company. 

CANFIELD, ISRAEL. Age, 40. Enlisted, July 26, '62. at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, to date Jan. 3, '64; also borne as 
Caufield. 

CAREY, GEORGE. Age, 30. Enlisted, .Aug. 9, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 20, '65. 

CAREY, JAMES. Age, 29. Enlisted. July 23, '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; discharged for disability, July 22, 
'65, at hospital, David's Island, Xew York Harbor. 

CAROLE, LEWIS. Age, 36. Enlisted. Sept, 5, '64. at Pittsburgh, to serve 
one year; private, Co. A, Sept. 15, '64; discharged with detachment, 
June 16, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe, as Carroll; also borne as Carreau. 

CARPENTER, EARL P. Age. 24. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal in Sept., '64; mustered out with 
company. 

CARTE, MITCHELL. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; died, Sept. 6, '64, 
at Andersonville, Ga. 

CARTER, JOHN. Ace, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Flattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; no record subsequent to Aug. 31, '65, as present sick 
in hospital, Fort Monroe, Va. 

CARTER, JOHN L. Age. 24. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; as adjutant, July 9, '63; wounded (lost right arm) and 
captured at Drury's Bluu; paroled, no date, discharged for disability 
from wounds, Oct. 11, '64. 

CARTER, JOSEPH. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 2<>, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 21, '63, at Simpson 
Hospital, near Relay House, Md. 

CARTER, PAUL. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Flattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; absent on furlough in June, '64, and at muster-out of 
company. 

CASE, ALLEN. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for disability, 
Feb. 4, '65. 

CASE, WALTER. Age 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

CASEVAH, JOSEPH. Age, 24. Enlisted. Aug. 8, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Cassavah, Cassa- 
vaut and Cassevant. 

CASHMAN, WILLIAM. Age, 22. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Ellenburgh; 

private, Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, no date; i 

mustered out with company. 

CASSAVAH, JOHN. Age, 44. Enlisted at Flattsburgh: private, Co. B, 
Jan. 4, '64; wounded at Drury's Bluff and Fair Oaks; discharged, June S, 
'05, at hospital, Fort Monroe; also borne as Cassavan. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTEE 225 

CASSAVAH, STEPHEN. Age IS. Enlisted at Cha/.v; private, Co. B, 
Dec. 7, '(53; captured in action at Drury's Bluff; died, June 15, '64. at 
Richmond. 

CASSEVAH, FRANK. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 20, '62; absent, missing in action since Drury's Bluff, and at 
muster-out of company; also borne as Cassavaugt. Probably died in 
prison. 

CHAMBERLAIN, WILLIAM B. Age. date, place of enlistment and muster- 
in as private, Co. G, not stated; captured at Fair Oaks; died, Jan. 5, '65, 
at Salisbury, N. C. 

CHAMBERLIN, MARTIN. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 22. '02. at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 31, '65, 
near Manchester, Vn. 

CHAMBERLIN, SIMON E. Age, 28. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; second 
lieutenant, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; first lieutenant, Jan. 1, '63; discharged. 
May 15, '64, to accept commission as captain in 25th Cavalry. 

CHAMPAGNE, FRED. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 0, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, March 31, '63, at 
hospital, West Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHAMPAINE, FRANCIS. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; .discharged for disability, April 4, '65, at 
hospital, as Champaigne. 

CHASE, GEORGE. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug 30, '62; transferred to Co. E. 19th Regiment, Veteran 
Reserve Corps, Oct. 29, '63; discharged, July 13, '65, at Elmira, X. Y. 

CHASE, LUTHER B. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, May 4, '64; mustered out with 
company. 

CHASE, WILLIAM A. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 22. '64, at Franklin, to 
serve one year; mustered in as private, Co. E, Aug. 25. '64; discharged, 
July 8, '65, at hospital, Albany, X. Y.; also borne as William H. 

CHATTERTON, HENRY P. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62. at Pitts- 
burgh; private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, May 29, '65; mustered out 
with company; also borne as Cotterton. 

CHEESEMAN, JOHN. Age 33. Enlisted, Aug. 12. '62, at Plattsburgh: 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of dysentery, Oct. 8, '64, at Altona, X. Y. 

CHERCO, HENRY. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; no further record. 

CHUBB, GEORGE L. Age, 18. Fmlisted, July 23, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died, Dec. 13, '62, at camp near Fort Ethan 
Allen. 

CHUBB, GEORGE W. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at St. Armand; 

private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; appointed wagoner and returned to com- 
pany as private, no dates; discharged, June S, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

CLAPPER, JOHN. Age, date, place of enlistment and muster in as private, 
Co. I, not stated; transferred to 16th Artillery, March 6, '65. 

CLARK, EBEN. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Essex, to serve three 
years; mustered in as private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Har- 
rison; discharged for disability, Feb. 1, '05, at Fort Harrison. 



226 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

CLARK, GEORGE H. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02. at Johnsburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, May 10, '63, at 
Finley Hospital, Washington. 

CLARK, GEORGE W. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 2S, '02, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, April 1, '05; mustered out with company. 

CLEMENTS, CURTIS. Age. 30. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '03, at Moriah; private, 
Co. B, Dec. 10, '03; transferred to Co. B, 90th Infantry. 

CLINE, ENOCH. Age, 29. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. H, Dec. 
10, '03; captured at Dairy's Bluff; died, Aug. 7, '04, at Richmond. 

CLINE, HERMAN H. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '02, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 22, 
'03; also borne as Heman H. 

CLINE, LESTER. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 31, '02, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, no date; deserted on expiration of furlough, 
June 0, '05. 

CLUTE, EDWARD E. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; wounded in June, '04; 
sergeant, no date; first sergeant, June 9, '05; mustered out with company. 

CLUTE, JOHN. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '02, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

COBB, JR., EBENEZER. Age. 38. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02. at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Jan. 10, '03, at 
camp near Fort Ethan Allen. 

COBB, JOHN D. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at Essex; private, Co. 
F, Aug. 17, '62; ' corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, Nov. 23. '03; wounded, 
June 15, '04, at Petersburg; absent, sick, at muster-out of company. 

COFFEE, WILLL4.M A. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

COLLEY, HENRY D. Age, 19. Enlisted at Chesterfield, to serve one year; 
private, Co. A, Feb. 28, '05; discharged, Nov. 0; '05, at New York City; 
also borne as Cooley. 

COLLINS, AMOS. Age, 19. Enlisted, Nov. 11, '03, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. A, Nov. 30, '03; wounded and captured in action, at Dairy's Bluff; 
died of vail sclopet caused by wounds, June 9, '04, at Richmond. 

COLLINS, DAVID. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at Dannemora; private, 
Co. B, Aug. S, '02; transferred to Co. 1, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Daniel. 

COLLINS, HENRY. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; died of consumption, April 19, '03, at Ecking- 
ton Hospital, Washington. 

COLONEY, JAMES M. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '02: sergeant, Aug. 29, '02; died of remittent 
fever, Aug. 31, '63, at hospital, Hampton, Ya. 

COLWELL, JOHN. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at North Hudson; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, April 15, '63, at 
Eckimrton Hospital, Washington; also borne as Caldwell and Cauldwell. 

COMBS, ISAAC M. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Sehroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug 30, '02; mustered out, June 30, '05, at Albany, N. Y., as 
McCoombs. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 227 

COMES, GEORGE W. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 22. '62. at Warren.^burtih; 
private, Co. G,.Aug. 20, '02: sergeant, Aug. 25, '62; discharged, June 30, 
'Go, at Albany, N. Y.: also borne as Combs and Comes. 

COMES, JOSHUA. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Warren-burgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, July 6, '65, at hospital, Albany, 
N. Y., as Combs; also borne as Cornes. 

COMSTOCK, EDGAR. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A. Aug. 10, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; discharged, June 3, '65, at Ernory Hospital, Washington. 

CONCHIO, ZEMETT. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 26, '63, at Black Brook- 
private, Co. F, Dec. 31, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as 
Zormette Cochy, Conehey and Couchy. 

CONGER, ALBERT M. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Willsboro; 
private. Co. F, Aug. 29, '62: wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; 
paroled, no date; discharged, June 14, '65, at Annapolis: also borne as 
Albert N, 

CONGER, WILLIAM H. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Willsboro; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 20, '62: sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for dis- 
ability, Jan. 14, '63, at Post Hospital, Relay House, Md. 

CONLEY, JAMES. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Crown Point: private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; appointed wagoner and returned to company as 
private, no dates; mustered out with company. 

CONVERSE, GEORGE. Age, 44. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Jay: private, 
Co. E, Dec. 22. '63; transferred to Co. B, 24th Regiment. Veteran Reserve 
Corps, no date; discharged for disability, April 4, '65, at Wisewell Barracks, 
Washington. 

COOLIDGE, WILLIAM. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, July 12, '65, at Albany, N. Y. 

COON, MARTIN V. B. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, April 25, '64; mustered out with 
company. 

COPELAND, CHARLES F. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 29. '62, at Queens- 
bury? private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; absent, 
sick in hospital at muster-out of company; also borne as Charles E. 

CORRTER, JEROME. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company, as Currier. 

COTIE, JR., JOHN E. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private. Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 25, '63, at 
Finley Hospital, Washington. 

COTTRILL, CHARLES H. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. IS, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 23, '62; no further record; also borne as Cottrell. 

COVEL, HENRY D. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, Feb. 27, '05; mustered out with company; 
also borne as Henry C. Coval and Covill. 

COWLES, ORANGE A. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. S. '62, at Queensbury; 
private. Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, 
Dec. V), '64: absent, sick at hospital at muster-out of company. 

COX, WILLIAM. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Johnsburgh: private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '6)2; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; transferred to First Battalion, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 10. '05. 



228 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

COX, WILLIAM. Age, 38. Enlisted at Chazv; private, Co. B, Dee. 22, 
'63; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

COYLE, JOHN. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Sept. 3, '62, at New York city. 

CRAIG, JOHN. Age, 10. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. K, Nov. 27, 
'63; transferred to 06th Infantry. 

CRANNELL, ABNER B. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Oct. 20, '02, near Relay 
House, Md. 

CRANNELL, JR., JOHN M. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. S. '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, June 0, '05; mustered out 
with company. 

CRARY, CHAUNCEY. Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

CROFF, ABNER. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at Queensburv; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to 160th Infantry in Oct., '62. 

CROMIE, WILLIAM. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

CRONK, SAMUEL B. Age. 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; deserted, April 13, '63, at Washington. 

CROSS, LAMBERT. Age, 41. Enlisted, July 20, '02. at Lewis; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; discharged with detachment in June, '65, at Fort 
Monroe. 

CROSSMAN, SENECA A. Age, 2S. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '02, at Crown 
Point; private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps 
before June, '64. 

CROWNINGSHIELD, BARNETT. Ago, 20. Enlisted. Au^. 13, '62, at 
Elizabethtown; private, Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; 
paroled, no date; absent, sick at Annapolis, Aid., at muster-out of company. 

CUMMINGS, MICHAEL. Age, 2S. Enlisted, July 20, '02, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 20, '02; mustered out with company. 

CUNNINGHAM, JAMES D. Age, 10. Enlisted, Feb. 15, '05, at North 
Elba, to serve one year; private, Co. F, Feb. IS, '65: discharged, June 15, 
'05, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

CUNNINGHAM, JOHN L. Age, 22. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieu- 
tenant, Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; captain, Co. D, Aug. 14, '03; major, Sept. 10, 
'64; mustered out with regiment. Wounded in actions at South Anna 
Bridge and Fort Harrison. Served at times, as regimental adjutant and 
quartermaster, in various positions on brigade and division staffs and in 
special service, including provost marshal of Portsmouth and Williams- 
burgh, Va. 

CURTIS, BENJAMIN. Age, 23. Enlisted at Plattsburgh: private, Co. B, 
Aug. 17, '04; transferred to 00th Infantry. 

CURTIS, NATHAN. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02. at Moriah: private, 
Co. F, Aug. 20, '02; died of typhoid fever, Aug. 12, '63, at Gloucester 
Point, Va. 

CUSHING, PETER. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Black Brook- 
private, Co. K, Aug. 10. '02; appointed wagoner, Aim. 30. Y>2; returned 
to companv as private, no date; transferred to Veteran Beberve Corps, 
Sept. 3, '03. 






INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 229 

CUTLER, AVRIEL. Ago, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company, as Averill. 

CUTTA, ANTONA. Age, 25. Enlisted at New York City; private, Co. B, 

I March 18, 'Go; transferred to Co. B, 96th Infantry, while absent without 

leave. 
DAILEY, EDWIN M. Age, 22. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '63, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. E, Dec. 17, '63; wounded at Drurys Bluff; discharged, June 
14, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe; also borne as Daylcy. 

DANFORTH, GEORGE. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, 
Co. C. Aug. 17, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, no date; discharged, 
July 15, '65, at Albany, N. Y.; also borne as Danfort. 

DANIELS, AUSTIN. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 9, "62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, June 7, '63, at 
General Hospital. 

DANIELS, LEWIS P. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged in June, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

DAPHINA, FRANCIS. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 1, '65; also 
borne as Duphina and Duphine. 

DAVIS, ABRAM A. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

DAVIS, GEORGE. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 31, '05, at 
| Manchester, Va. 

DAVIS, HOWLAND R. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 10, '62; corporal, Aug. 13, '62; captured at Fair Oaks and 
supposed died in prison. 

DAVIS, JAMES P. Aire, 23. Enlisted, Julv 31, '62. at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 21, '63. 

DAVIS, LUCIUS B. M. Age, 19. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private. Co. B, 
Dec. 15, '63; wounded, no date; discharged for disability, May 31, '65. 
near Manchester, Va. 

DAVIS, MARQUIS. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Queensbury: private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of pyaemia from contusion of back, Oct. 20, '64, 
at Hospital, Fort Monroe. 

DAVIS, REUBEN. Ace. 26. Enlisted, Aus. 11. '62, at North Elba; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died, July 21, '63, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. 

DAVIS, REUBEN J. Age, 27. Enlisted, Julv 29, '62, at Chester: private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 9, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

DAWSON, JOHN. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Stony Creek; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; absent, sick in hospital at muster-out of company. 

DAY, HOSEA. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; wounded in action at Fort Harrison; transferred to 
105th Company, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 20, 'G5; 
discharged, Aug. 28, '65, at Mower Hospital, Philadelphia. 

DEAN, BETHUEL P. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aim. 20, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '02; returned to ranks. 
March 30. 'M; discharged, Aug. 10, '63, at hospital; also borne as 
Bethewell P. Deene. 



230 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

■ 

DECORO, JOSEPH. Age, 16. Enlisted, May — , '64, at Monroe; private, 
Co. G, Oct, 22, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DECORY, GERVIS G. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Pittsburgh; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; absent, sick at Balfour Hospital, Port-mouth, 
Va., at muster-out of company; also borne as Jarvis G. Decorria. 

DEFO, JONATHAN. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. K, 
Dec. 12, '63; discharged for disability, March 11, 'Co, at Hampton, Va.; 
also borne as Defoe. 

DEFO, NELSON. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Peru; private, Co. K, 
Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 



DEFOE, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, unassigned, 
Dec. 15, '63; wounded in June, '64; no further record. 

DE JORDAN, PAUL. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Dejordian, De Jordon and De Jourdan. 

DE JORDON, LOUIS. Age. 42. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62, at Pittsburgh, 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

DELANY, PATRICK K. Age, — . Enrolled at Albany; first lieutenant and 
quartermaster, Aug. 14, '62; discharged, Aug. 19, '64, to accept promotion 
as captain and assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers. 

DELONA, EDWARD. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Chazv; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died, Aug. 16, '64, 
at 18th Army Corps Hospital; also borne as Deloney. 

DELOVEAR, GEORGE. Age, 38. Enlisted at Albany, to serve one year; 
private, Co. E, Sept. S, '64; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Delorier and Delover. 

DEMARGE, NELSON. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; absent, sick at Base 
Hospital, Point of Rocks, Va., at muster-out of company. 

DEMARS, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, Julv 6, "65, at hospital, Albany, 
N. Y. 

DEMO, ADIAR. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Peru; private, Co. K, 
Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Adiah. 

DEMO, JOSEPH. Age, 44. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. K, 
Dec. 15, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DEMO, SILAS. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62. at Peru; private, Co. K; 
Aug. 30, '62; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died, May 26, '64, 
at Richmond, Va. 

DENNIS, JOSEPH. Age, 19. Enlisted, Dec. 7, '63, at Willsboro; private, 
Co. D, Dec. 21, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DENTON, CHAUNCEY. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62. at Elizabethtown, 
private, Co. E, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; discharged for 
disability, May 25, 'hn, at Hampton Hospital, Va. 

DERUSHA, ALEXANDER. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aim. 9. '62, at Saranac; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Derueha. Deurocheu, Durocha and Duroshew. 

DESROCHE, PIERRE. Age, 30. Enlisted. Dec. 14, '63, at Moriah; private, 
unassigned, Dec. 16, '63; no further record. 



< 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 231 

DEVINS, JOSEPH. Age, 22. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, unassigned, Sept. 2, '64; no further record. 

DEVINS, MARK. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; promoted corporal, April 30, '65; mustered out with 
company. 

DEVINS, PATRICK. Age, 30. Enlisted, Sept. 2, '01, at Pittsburgh, to 
serve one year; private, Co. K, Sept. 12, '64; mustered out with company. 

DEVINS, PETER. Age, IS. Enlisted. Sept. 2, '64, at Pittsburgh, to serve 
one year; private, Co. K, Sept. 12, '64; mustered out with company. 

DEVOE, JOSEPH.- Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. I, Dec. 
15, '63; discharged for disability, Oct. 11, '64; also borne as Defore. 

DEZOTHE, BENJAMIN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Dec. 2, '63, at Chazy; private, 
Co. G, Dec. 4, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '65, while absent; 
supposed to be a prisoner since June, '64; also borne as Desotte and 
Desoth; probably died in prison. 

DICKINSON, MYRON N. Age, 32. Enrolled, Aug. 1, '62, at Warrens- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; second lieutenant, Aug. 21, '62; first 
lieutenant, Nov. 20, '62; severely wounded and captured at Fair Oaks; 
paroled, no date; discharged for wounds, May 3, '65. 

DIETTE, FRANCIS. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; ako borne as 
Deyette, Deygnette and Digynette. 

DILLENBACK, WALTER JOHN. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Ellen- 
burgh; private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 
8, '65; discharged, Aug. 11, '65, at hospital, Albany, N. Y. 

DILTS, JOHN H. Age, 24. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Jay; private, Co. C, 
Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Dec 11, '63, at hospital, Fort 
Schuyler, N. Y*. 

DINGMAN, JAMES H. Age, 22. Enlisted. Aug. 20, '62, at Luzerne; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Co. D, Aug. 30, '62; promoted 
corporal, Feb. 27, '65; mustered out with company. 

DINGMAN, WILLIAM. N. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 15, '62, at Stony 
Creek; private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; captured at Fair Oaks and supposed 
to have died in prison. 

DINSMORE, AMBROSE. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, May 27, '65, 
at Norfolk. 

DIVINE, JOSEPH T. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. A,. Sept. 2, '64; mustered out with company. 

DOBBES, JOHN. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Jan. 1, '63, as Dobbs. 

DOBBS, GEORGE R. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, April 2, '65, at 
hospital, as Dubs. 

DOBBS, IRA. Age, 34. Enlisted at Plat tsburgh, to serve one year; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '64; wounded at Fort Harrison; mustered out, with company. 

DOBIE, DAVID F. Age, 22. Enrolled, Aug. 12, '62. at Plattsburgh: first 
lieutenant, Co. II, Aug. 21, '62; captain, April 30, '64; wounded at Fort 
Harrison: mustered out with regiment. 



232 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

DOCKET, JOSEPH. Age, 26. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Queensbury; 

private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed, June 11, '64, at Cold Harbor; borne as 
Doket. 

DOCKUM, SWETLAND. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged with detachment for disability, 
May 27, '65, at Fort Monroe; also borne as Dockem and Dockuin. 

DOLPH, LEONARD. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Crown Point; ' 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Nov. 16, '63, at 
Hospital, Hampton, Va.; also borne as Leandcr Dolph. 

DOMING, JOHN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazv; private. Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 12, '63, at Eckington Hos- 
pital, Washington. 

DOMINY, LEVI S. Age, 30. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain, Co. B, 
Aug. 13, '62; major, Aug. 29, '64, lieutenant colonel, Sept. 16, '64; mus- 
tered out with regiment. 

DOOLING, JAMES. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

DOTY, ALEXANDER. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at St, Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

DOTY, JAMES. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. C, Nov. 
27, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DOTY, JOSEPH. Age, 44. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. C, Dec. 1.5, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DOUDELAN, JESSE. Age, 18. Enlisted at Schenectady, to serve one 
year; private, Co. G, March 16, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry; also 
borne as Doodlow and Doudelaw. 

DOUDELAN, PETER. Age, IS. Enlisted at Schenectady, to serve one 
year; private, Co. G, March 16, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry as Doude- 
law and Doodlow. 

DOUDLOW, FREDERICK. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '63, at Platts- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Dec. 15, '63: transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, 
'65; also borne as Doudelan, Doudelaw, Doudlcan and Deudlin. 

DOUGHERTY, WILLIAM. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 10, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed, June S, '64, at Cold Elarbor as William H. 

DOUGLASS, HENRY. Age, 18. Enlisted at Black Brook, to serve one 
year; private, Co. I, Sept. 13, '64; captured at Fair Oaks and supposed 
died in prison. 

DOWNEY, THOMAS. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 19, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; mustered out with company. 

DRAKE, HIRAM. Ace, 42. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. 1), Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; first sergeant, March 27, '63; 
mustered out with company; also borne as Draker. 

Commissioned, not mustered, second lieutenant, June 16, '65, with rank 
from May 22, X)^. 

DROWN, EMERSON S. Age, 18. Enlisted at Saranac: private, Co. B, 
November — , '63; captured at Fair Oaks and supposed died in prison. 

DUBA, FRANCIS. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 15, '62, at Mooers: private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Aug. 26, '63, at Camp Con- 
valescent, Alexandria, Va. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 233 

DUBRAY, CHARLES. Age, 18. Enlisted at Plattsburgh,' to serve one 
year; private, unassigned, Sept. 6, '04; no further record. 

DUCHER, RICHARD. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Dutcher. 

DUEL, OSCAR O. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 20, '02, at Horicon, to serve 
three years; mustered in as private. Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at 

IDrury's Bluff; mustered out with company. 
DUEL, WILLIAM C. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; sergeant. Dec. 25, '03; wounded 
and captured at Drury's Bluff; died, 'June 30, '64, at Richmond; also borne 
as Duell. 

DUELL, WARREN H. Age, 43. Enlisted at Queensburv, to serve one year; 
private, Co. D, March 15, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

DUFFY, JAMES. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; died of typhoid fever, April 0, '03, at Regimental 
Hospital, Washington. 

DUGAN, PATRICK H. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Horicon; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; mustered out with 
company. 

DUGAN, RICHARD. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Dannemora; 

(private, Co. B, Aug. 8, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; wounded at 
Fair Oaks; discharged for disability, May 9, '05, at Manchester. Va. 

DUGLES, ANTHONY. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged June 3, '65, at Washington; also 
borne as Dagles. 

DUNCKLEE, CHARLES F. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Crown 
Point; private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 4, '65, at Peters- 
burg; also borne as Dundee. 

DUNLAP, NORRIS W. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62. at Newromb; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; died of congestive chills, Sept. S, '63, at 
Gloucester Point, Va.; also borne as Dunloff. 

DUNN, GEORGE. Age, 34. Enlisted. July 30, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30. '62; mustered out with company. 

DUNNING, AUGUSTUS. Age, 18. Enlisted. Aug. 2, '62, at Champlain: 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 25, '62. 

DUPUIS, DANIEL H. Age, 26. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63. at Moriah; private, 
Co. E, Dec. 23, '63; wounded in Junr, '04; captured at Fair Oaks; reported 
died in prison, at Salisbury, X. C. 

DUPUIS,. EUGENE. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Moriah; private. 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; absent, 
sick, at Annapolis, Md., at muster-out of company; also borne as Dupois 
and Dupree. 

DURETT, GEORGE E. Age, 18. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. B, 
Dec. 15, '03; died, Nov. 12, '04, at Base Hospital, Va., as Derrot. 

DURKING, MORRIS. Age, 23. Enlisted. July 2 t" "02, at North Hudson; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

DUTRAW, NICHOLAS. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Ansftble; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, no date, at Newark, 
N. J. 



234 INDIVIDUAL- SERVICE ROSTER 

DUTRAW, PEMBROKE. Age. 18. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died of diphtheria, March 16, '64, at Magnolia Springs, 
\a.; also borne as Datraw and Dewtraw. 

DUTTON, HIRAM F. Age, 32. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. D, Dec. 16, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died of his wounds, May 
28, '64; also borne as Hiram H. Duttan. 

DWYRE, ELIJAH. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62 at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 19, '62; corporal, Aug. 21, '62; mustered out with 
company as Dwyer. 

DYER, JAMES W. Age, 22. Enlisted, Dec. 22, '63, at Beekmantown; 
private, Co. A, Dec. 30, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

EASTMAN, ROBERT D. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at .Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; supposed died in 
prison. 

EDWARDS, GEORGE. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

ELDRIDGE, EDMOND. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; captured in action at Fair Oaks and sup- 
posed died in prison. 

ELLMORE, MITCHEL. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Co. C. 19th R.egimont, Veteran 
Reserve Corps, no date; discharged with detachment, July 13, 1865, at 
Elmira, X. Y. 

EMERY, ANDREW. Age, 44. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chazy. private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to 50th Company, Second Battalion, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; discharged, May 25, '65, at Harrisburg, 
Pa.; also borne as Emory. 

EMERY, JOHN. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62. at Ellenburgh; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for wounds and 
disability, May 15, '65, at De Camp Hospital, New Y r ork Harbor, as Emory. 

EMERY, SAMUEL C. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Saranac; cor- 
poral, Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; sergeant, no date; captured at Fair Oaks; 
paroled, no date; discharged, June 13, '65, at Annapolis, Md.; also borne 
as Emory. 

EMERY, WILLIAM. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; appointed drummer and returned to company as 
private, no dates; mustered out with company as William H. Emory. 

ERAW, MOSES. Age, 21. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. G, Dec. 22, 
'63; discharged, July 15, 'Go, at Albany, N. Y., from hospital near Troy, 
N. Y.; also borne as Erar, Erau, Erne, Eron and Erue. 

ESTES, JAMES H. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; mustered out with company. 

EVANS, FREDERICK. Age, 30. Enlisted in $inth Congressional District; 
private, Co. I, May 30, '64; captured at Fair Oaks, supposed died in prison. 

EVANS, JOHN P. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62. at Saranac; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid 
fever, Feb. 25, '6'S, at Washington. 

EVANS, ROBERT K. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal and sergeant, no dates; discharged, 
Slay 9, 'ijii, at Albany, N. Y.; also borne as Evens. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 235 

FARRELL, WALTER. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, Oct, 20, '64; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Farrall. 

FAVROW, WILLIAM H. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 21, '62; appointed musician, Aug. 29, '62; returned 
to company as private, no date; died of disease, Aug. S, '64, at New York 
City. 

FAY, ARTEMAS W. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. il, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; sergeant, April 15, '63; mustered out 
with company. 

FELIO, ANTONIA. Age, 24. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. K, 
Jan. 5, '64; wounded, July 9, '64, near Petersburg and died of his wounds in 
camp, no date; also borne as Antoine Folia. 

FELTT, AARON C. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; died, Sept. 14, '63, at Hampton Hospital, Hampton, Ya.; 
also borne as Felt. 

FENTON, CHARLES. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 19, '62, at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with 
company. 

FERNETT, GEORGE. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Furnett and Ternett. 

FERNETT, MITCHELL. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; absent, wounded and captured at Drury's 
Bluff; supposed to be dead; also borne as Michael Furnett. 

FERRIS, CASSIUS S. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. C, 
Dec. 15, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

FERRIS, EDLEY B. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal and sergeant, no dates; wounded at Cold 
Harbor and died of his wounds, July 5, "64, at 18th Corps Hospital. 

FERRISS, EMMERSON W. Age, IS. Enlisted at Peru; private, Co. C, 
March 13, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

FIF1ELD, CHARLES. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Mooers; private 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; missing since Fair Oaks; also borne as Charles A. 
Fefield; supposed captured and died in prison. 

FIFIELD, GEORGE A. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; discharged, 
June 21, '65, at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md.; also borne as George S. 

FIFIELD, HENRY. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for wounds at 
hospital near Troy, N. Y.; also borne as Fyfield. 

FIFIELD, WILLIAM S. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 9, '^o, at hospital, Fort Monroe, Ya. 

FINIGAN, JR., MICHAEL. Age, 18. Enlisted. July 21, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, and corporal, no dates; discharged, 
May 25, '65, at hospital. Fort Monroe, as Michael Finegan; also borne as 
Finnigan. 

FINN, FERDINAND. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 19, '62. at Complain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Sept. 20, '62, at Relay House. Md. 

FISH, EDWARD B. Age, 24. Enlisted, July 19, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Jan. 6, 'i55, at David's 
Island, New York Harbor. 



236 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

FISHER, FORRESS B. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug, 11, '02, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, June 3, '65, at hospital, 
Point of Rocks, Va. 

FISHER, GEORGE W. Age, IS. Enlisted at North Elba, to serve one 
year; private, Co. G, Sept. 10, '64; captured at Fair Oaks, Va.; died, 
Dec. 1, '64, at Salisbury, N. C; also borne as E. W. 

FISHER, RUSSELL E. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at North Elba; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

FISX, ADONIRAM J. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Jav; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; died, June 27, '63, at Yorktown, Va. 

FISK, JOSEPH. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Essex; private, Co. F, 
Aug. 16, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, and wounded, no dates; 
mustered out with company. 

FITCH, WILLIAM S. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
corporal, Nov. 16, '63; sergeant, March 1, '64; mustered out with company . 

FITZSIMMONS, PATRICK. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh to serve 
one year; private, Co. A, Jan. 31, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

FLAGG, SILAS S. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Elizabethtowu ; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with companv; .also borne as 
Flay. 

FLANDERS, JOHN J. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Luzerne: private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, Jan. 14, '63, at Post Hospital, Relav 
House, Md. 

FLANSBURGH, HENRY. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11. '62. at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Diary's Bluff; transferred to 
•59th Company, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; dis- 
charged, April 20, '05, at Barracks, Easton, Pa. 

FLANSBURGH, JAMES D. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johns- 
burgh; private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, April 2, '63; sergeant, no 
date; killed at Fort Harrison. 

FLETCHER, JOHN W. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30. '62; discharged for disability, May 16, '65, at Balfour 
hospital, Portsmouth, Va. 

FLYNN, JOHN. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 6 ; '62, at Wcstport; private, Co. 
F, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks, and absent at muster-out of com- 
pany; also borne as Flinn; supposed died in prison. 

FORBES, WILLIAM. Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62 at Jay; private; 
Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant, no date; killed 
at Fair Oaks; also borne as Eorbs. 

Commissioned second lieutenant, Nov. 2S, '64; killed before being mus- 
tered in. 

FORD, CHARLES. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 9, '63, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. B, Dec. 15, '63; transferred to Co. B, 96th Infantry, June 13, '65. 

FORD, HENRY W. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private. 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; missoig at Fair Oaks; supposed captured and died in 
prison. 

FORD HAM, CHARLES H. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62. at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. 11, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, no date. 

FORDHAM, DANIEL. Age, 26. Enlisted, Dec. 13, '63, at Peru; private, 
Co. H, Dec. 15, '03; transferred to 90tli Infantry. 



INDIVID D A L SERVICE ROSTER 237 






FORDHAM, THOMAS. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Plattsbtirgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; wounded at Drury'g Bluff; discharged for dis- 
ability, Oct. 27, '64, at hospital, Fort Schuyler, N. Y. 

FOSTER, FRANKLIN. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 17, '02, at Queonsbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

FRAZIER, GEORGE. Age. 42. Enlisted, July 23, '02, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, March 23, '63, at Finley' 
Hospital, at Washington. 

FRAZIER, WILLIAM. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Johnsbureh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; wounded, no date; died of wounds and dis- 
ease, Feb. 5, '05, at hospital, Philadelphia; also borne as Frasier. 

FREEBERN, WILLIAM. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 13. '02, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug.. 30, "02; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; 
discharged, June 17, 'Go, at Camp Parole, Annapolis, as Freeburn. 

FREEMAN, GODFREY. Age, 3S. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Moiiah; 
private, Co. F, Ana:. 21, '02; transferred to Co. B. no date; to Co. E, 
Aug. 20, '02; wounded, no date; discharged for disability, April 1, 'Go, at 
hospital, Willett's Point, New York Harbor. 

FRENCH, ANSON. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '02; promoted corporal, Aug. 30, '62; sergeant, 
Jan. 31, '65, mustered out with company. 

FRENCH, DANIEL L. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Crown Point: 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; captured at Drury's Bluff and died of val 
sclopete, at Richmond, no dates; also borne as Daniel S. 

FRENYEA, WILLIAM. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; appointed wagoner, no date, mustered out 
with company; also borne as Franyea and Frinyea. 

FRJSBIE, WILLIAM L. Ago, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 7, "02, at Westport; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 10, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; died of typhoid fever, 
Feb. 15, '03. at hospital, near Relay House. Md. 

FROSSIA, ANTOINE. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; deserted, July 27, '03, at hospital, near New 
York city. 

FULLER, DANLEL. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 30, '03, at Peru; private, Co. 
A. Dec. 31, '03: transferred to Co. A, 90th Infantry, June 13, '05. 

FULLER, DARIUS. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at Johnsburgh.; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Nov. 2S, '62; also 
borne as Delius. 

FULLER, GEORGE W. Age, 25. Enlisted. Aug. S, '02, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 22, '02; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; deserted, Aug. 3. '03, 
at hospital. 

FULLER, HENRY C. Age. 33. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; deserted, February 8, '03, at camp, near Fort Ethan 
Allen, Ya.: sentenced by general court-martial to be shot; sentence com- 
muted to 3 years' imprisonment. 

FULLER, LEVI. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 1, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Aug, 29, '02; died of disease, June 1, '04, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

FULLER, SILAS B. Age, 19. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '03. at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. J), Jan. 5, '04; died of disease, April 1, '04, at Balfour Hospital, Ports- 
mouth, Va. 

FULTON, SAMUEL. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 31, '02, at Ellenburgh; 
private. Co. B. Aug. 13, '02; corporal, same date; returned to ranks, no 
date; deserted, Oct. 8, '02, at Camp Wool, near Relay House, Md. 



23S INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

GAMBOL, JR., WILLIAM. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Stonv Creek; 
piivate, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

GARDNER, JOSEPH. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, atSohroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to 37tb Company, Second Battalion, 
veteran Reserve Corps, no date; mustered out with detachment, June 
28, '65, at Washington, as Gardener. 

GARDNER, MARTIN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, ''62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Dairy's Bluff; absent, sick" in 
hospital, at muster-out of company. 

GARRANT, JOHN. Age, 18. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. H, 
Nov. 2-1, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

GARRETT, JAMES S. Age, 27. Enrolled at FliUsburgh; private, Co. A. 
Aug. 10, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 29, '62: second lieutenant, Dec. 9, '62; 
first lieutenant, Co. B, Jan. 14, '64; absent, on detached service at Anna- 
polis, Md., at muster-out of company; also borne as Garritt. 

GASK1LL, WILLIAM M. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, April 30, '64; captured at Fair Oaks 
and paroled; discharged, June 28, '65, at hospital, Albany, X. Y.; also 
borne as James M. and William H. Gaskal. 

GATES, HIRAM B. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Aug. 6, '63. 

GATES, JOHN. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

GATES, OSCAR J. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

GATES, WILLIAM H. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh. 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Dmry's Bluff; transferred to 
47th Company, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; 
mustered out, July 1. '65, at Washington. 

GEARY, FELIX. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 1, ? 62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 26, '65, at Plattsburgh, X. Y.; also 
borne as Phelix Gary. 

GEBO, EDMOND. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, Sept. 3, '62, at New York City; also borne 
as Gbeo, Gibo and Jbeo. 

GEEBO, WILLIAM. Age, 42. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 2S, '63, at 
hospital, Relay House, Md., as Gebo. 

GERO, FREDERICK. Aire, IS. Enlisted at Bekmantown; private, Co; 

H, Dec. 21, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 
GERO, JAMES. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 

Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

GEROW, PLANEY. Age. 18. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for dis- 
ability, April 8, '63, as Pliney; also borne as Grow. 

GD3BS, NELSON J. Age, 22. Enrolled. Aug. 6, '62, at Wcstport; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 21, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant, no date; second 
lieutenant, Co. G, Sept. 23, '64; first lieutenant, Co. I, Dec. 23, '64; mus- 
tered out with company. 

GILBERT, EUGENE S. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 22. '62, at Chamnlain; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 29, '62; discharged with detachment, June 9, '65, at 
Fort Monroe. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 239 

GILMAN, ISAAC. Age, 43. Enlisted, July 16, '62. at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company as Gillman. 

GILMORE, JOHN. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Ellenburgh; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; died of typhoid fever, Jan. 20, '63, at Fort Ethan 
Allen, Va. 

GOLD, JOHN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62. at Essex; private, Co. F, 
Aug. 29, '62; died, Sept. 13, '63, at Hampton Hospital, Va.; also borne as 
Gould. 

GONIO, FRANK. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Crown Point; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62, captured at Drury's Bluff, paroled, no dates; absent, 
at muster-out of company; reported, died at Crown Point, N. Y. 

GONYEA, JOSEPH F. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private. 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to First Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, 
no date; discharged for disability May 25, '65, at Harrisburg, Pa., as of 
Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, as Gonyau; also borne as Gomia 
and Gonia. 

GONYO, HENRY. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded in June, '64; missin? at Fair Oaks; also 
borne as Henry Gonio, 1st, and Gonya; supposed died in prison. 

GONYO, 2d, HENRY. Age, 20. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. I, 
Nov. 27, '63; missing in action at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Gonyea; 
supposed captured and died in prison. 

GOODNOW, WILLIAM. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

GOODRICH, HUBBARD W. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, Dec. 9, '64; sergeant, May 1, 
'65; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with company. 

GOODRICH, RATHBURN V. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Ausable; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

GOODROW, PETER. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 4. '62, at Champlain; 

private, Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks; 

appointed wagoner and returned to company as private, no dates; mustered 

out, June'2, '65. 
GOODSPEED, 2d, ELLAS. Age, 30. Enlisted. July 25, '62, at St. Armand: 

private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

GOODSPEED, ERASTUS E. Age, 22. Enlisted, July '25, '62, at St. Ar- 
mand; private, Co. C„ Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

GOODWIN, JAMES. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Queensbury; 

private, Co. A, Au£r. 10, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's 

BlulT; discharged, June IS, '65, at Hospital, Fort Monroe; also borne as 

James B. 
GOOSEBERRY, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Ausable; 

private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

GORHAM, WALLACE. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Saranac; private, 

Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; died, July 12, '64, at hospital, Point of Rocks, Va.; 

also borne as Goraham. 
GOUGH, FRANCIS. Age, IS. Enlisted at Germantown: private, Co. II. 

Jan. 25, '64; died, Oct. 29, '64, at Hampton Hospital, \a.; also borne as 

Gofi. 
GOUGH, IAMES. Age, 44. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private. Co. H, 

Dee. LI, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died, June 25, '64, at Hampton 
i Hospital, Va. 



240 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

GOULD, NAPOLEON. Age, 18. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. 
H, Dec. 24, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Gold. 

GOURLAY, NORMAN. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 7, •'62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

GOVE, JAMES P. Age, 45. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; .private, Co. G, 
Dec. 15, '62; transferred to 96th Infantry; veteran.. 

GOYETTE, LEWIS. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, March 7, '63, at Camp- 
bell Hospital, Washington; also borne as Gueyette, Guyette and Gwyotte. 

GRACE, CHARLES A. Age, 19. Enrolled, July 28, '62, at Queen-bury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 6, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant, no date; 
second lieutenant, Co. F, May 22, '65; mustered out with company; also 
borne as Groce. 

GRANDY, MARTIN. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 19, '65. 

GRANDY, STEPHEN K. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; died of hospital gangrene, 
Aug. 20, '64, at Portsmouth Grove Hospital, R. I. 

GRANGER, JOSEPH. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

GRANT, JOHN M. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, and returned to ranks, no dates; discharged, 
June 16, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

GRATTON, CHARLES. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 19, '63, at 
hospital. 

GRAVES, HENRY S. Age, 23. Enrolled, July 28, '62, at Chazy; sergeant, 

Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; first sergeant, no date: second lieutenant, July 9. ; 63; 

first lieutenant, Co. E, May 17, '64; captain, Jan. 24, '65; mustered out 
with company. 

GRAY, JR., PARLEY. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Grey. 

GREEN, GEORGE B. Age, 30. Enlisted. July 27, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, April 2, '63; 
discharged for disability, Oct. 16, '63, at hospital, Philadelphia, Pa.; also 
borne as Greene. 

GREENE, JAMES G. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; appointed titer, Aug. 29, '62; returned to company as 
private, no date; mustered out with company; also borne as Green. 

GREGORY, EMERY. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Horicon: private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 19, '65, at hospital, 1'ort Monroe, as 
Emory Gregory. 

GREGORY, JOHN. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29. '62; discharged for disability, May IS. '64. 

GREGORY, PATRICK. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; 

private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 
GRIFFIN, LEMUEL. Age, 32. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62. at Bolton; private, 

Co. G, Aug. 30. 'ti2; discharged for disability, March 29, '63, at Camp 

Adirondack, Washington. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 241 

GRIMES, JOHN A. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, 'G2, at Warrensburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

GROFF, CROSBY. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '62, at Moriah; private, Co. 
F, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; killed at Drurv's Bluff; also borne as 
Crosbie CrafT and Goff. 

GROOM, WILLIAM H. Age, 34. Enlisted, Julv 16, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died of typhoid 
fever and wounds, June 18, '64, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

GUYETTE, ISRAEL. Age, IS. Enlisted. Dec. 13, '63. at Chazy; pnvate, 
Co. I, Jan. 2, '64; no record subsequent to April 30, 165. 

GWINUP, HENRY P. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62. at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; first sergeant, Aug, 30, '62; discharged, to date April 
4, '64, for promotion to second lieutenant in 38th Regiment, U. S. Colored 
Troops; also borne as Grump, Guinup and Gurnup. 

GYATT. ADOLPHUS. Age, 28. Enlisted, July 17. '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; 
mustered out with company. 

HAGAR, CHARLES L. Age, — . Enrolled at New York City as chaplain, 
Aug. 21, '62; mustered out with regiment, 

HALE, FREDERICK C. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 3, '65, at Richmond. 

HALL, GILBERT H. Age, 36. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 30, '65, at Albany, X. Y. 

HALL, HARRISON. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

HALL, HENRY L. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at Queensburv-; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; absent at muster-out of com- 
pany, supposed died in prison. 

HALL, JOHN H. Age, 27. Enlisted, Julv 21. '62, at Queensburv; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

HALL, WILLIAM E. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 6, '62; appointed drummer, Aug. 10, '62; returned to 
company as private, no "date; captured at Fair Oaks; absent at muster- 
out of company, supposed died in prison. 

HAMEL1N, ICHABOD. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged lor dis- 
ability with detachment, May 27, '65, at hospital, Hampton, Ya., as Hamlin. 

HAMMEL, PETER. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 21, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's 
Bluff; absent sick since and at muster-out of company; also borne as 
Hamel. 

HAMMOND, JAMES. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, Sept. 2, '62, at Albany, N. Y. 

HANCHETT, JEROME. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Elizabeth- 
town; private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company, as 
Handchctt. 

HARDY, JOSEPH D. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. S. '62, at West-port; private, 

Co. F, Aim. 29. '62; corporal, no dare; wounded at Drury's Bluff" •; mus- 
tered out with company; also borne as James B. Handy. 



242 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

HARE, JOSEPH. Age, 26. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; private, Co. 
H, Dec. 23, '63; deserted on expiration of furlough in Feb. '65; also borne 
as Hair. 

HARE, NELSON. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, April 30, '65: mustered out with company. 

HARMON, CHARLES W. Age, 26. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Chazv; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged, May 
29, '64, at Hospital, Washington, D. C, as Harrnan. 

HARPER, JOHN. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. A, Dec. 23, '63; captured at Fair Oaks; transferred to 96th Infantry, 
while absent; supposed died in prison. 

HARPER, RICHARD. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 12, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. H, Dec. 23, '63; died, no date, while absent, on furlough. 

HARRINGTON, GEORGE H. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, May 29, '65, at hospital, Camp 
Lee, Va. 

HARRINGTON, JOHN H. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Newcomb; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Sept. 25, '63, at 
Hospital, Philadelphia. 

HARRIS, ALFRED E. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. II. Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, July 19, '65, 
at Albany, N. Y., from hospital, Troy, N. Y. 

HARRIS, MELVIN. Age, 18. Enlisted at Beekmantown: private, Co. H, 
Dec. 22, '63; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died, May 20, '64, 
at Richmond, as M. J. Harris. 

HARRIS, NEWTON B. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with compan\\ 

HART, FREDERICK. Age, 28. Enlisted. Nov. 5, '63, at Mooers; private, 
Co. K, Jan. 5, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

HARTMAN, WILLIAM. Age, 3S. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 31, '65, near 
Manchester, Va. 

HARVEY, JASPER. Age, 43. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, June 17, 'do, at 
hospital, Fort Monroe. 

HASKIN, HIRAM C. Age, 20. Enlisted at Saranac; private, Co. B, Nov. 
20, '63; discharged, June 7, '65, at Albany, X. Y., as Haskins. 

HASKINS, CHARLES H. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Westport; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

HASTIE, ROBERT B. Age. 16. Enlisted, Aug. 15, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
fifer, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

HASTINGS, JAMES. Age, 32. Enlisted, July 29. '62, at Horicon; private. 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 28, '63; 
also borne as James M. 

HASTINGS, JOSEPH A. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 24, '62, at Horicon; 
private, Co. D. Aug. 18, Y>2; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Joseph E. 

Color" sergeant all through his services. Wounded in trenches before. 
Petersburg. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 243 

HATHEWAY, ABIAL. Age, 28, Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Saranae; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, June 15, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe, as 
Hathaway. 

HAVILAND, AMOS B. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for dis- 
ability,. May 4, '63, at Washington. 

HAWKITT, THOMAS. A K e, 45. Enlisted, Dec. 11, '03, at Ausable; 
private, Co. K, Dec. 16, '03; discharged, Nov. 7, '64, at hospital, David's 
Island, N. Y. Harbor, as Hawkett. 

HAYES, JOEL P. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 28, 'G2, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, July 29, '02; sergeant, Aug. 30, '02; returned to ranks, no date; 
mustered out with company. 

HAYES, JOHN. Age, 26. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; wounded at Drary's Bluff; mustered out with com- 
pany; also borne as John F. and Hays. 

HAYNES, SAMUEL W. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; died, Oct. 23, '02, at Relay House Hospital, 
Md.; also borne as Samuel W. Hains. 

HAYS, THOMAS J. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '02, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company, as Hayes. 

HAYS, WILLIAM H. Age, 36. Enlisted, July 24, '02, at Elizabeth town; 

private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out 
of company; also borne as Hayes. 

HAZELTINE, FREDERICK. Age, 38. Enlisted, July 29. '62, at Beekman- 
town; private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, 
Oct. 16, '63; mustered out, July 1, '65, at Washington; also borne as 
Hegeltine and Ilesiltine. 

HAZZARD, THOMAS. Age, 37. Enlisted, July 29, '62. at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; deserted, April 19, '03, at Camp Adirondack, 
near Washington, as Haggard. 

HEBERT, JOSEPH. Age, 33. Enlisted, July 19, '02, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 
17, '63; discharged for disability, Nov. 28, '63, at Washington. 

HEDDING, JONATHAN S. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June S, '05, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe, as Heading. 

HELKIER, JAMES. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 24, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, July 31, '62; no further record; also borne as Helkie. 

HENRY, IRA M. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 26, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 13, '65, from 
Balfour Hospital, Portsmouth, Va. 

HENRY, PETER. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Plattsburgh; private. 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; deserted, Oct. 0, '02, at Camp Relay House, Md. 

HEWITT, PETER V. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Auk. 17, '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; sergeant, March 15, '03; 
mustered out with company. 

HEWITT, URIAH. Ago, 30. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '03, at Jay; private. Co. 
E, Dee. 22, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

HEWS, JAMES. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 28, '02, at Chester; private, C<>. 
1), AUg. 2! . '02; killed by accidental discharge of a comrade's gun, Dec. 30, 
'62, as James Hughes. 



241 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

HIGGINS, JOSEPH H. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at John-burgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

HIGHLAND, WILLIAM. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at North Hud- 
son; private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Sept. 29, '63, 
at Hospital, Hampton, Va.; also borne as Hyland. 

HIGLEY, CHARLES W. Age. 35. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29. '62; sergeant, March 17, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff 
and killed, June 30, '64, before Petersburg. 

HILL, AMASA. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug- 6, '62, at Horicon; private, Co. D, 
Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; mustered out with company. 

HILL, IRA. Age, 21.' Enlisted, Aug. 3, '62, at Chester; private, Co. D, 
Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

HILL, LYMAN. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Ticonderoga; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62, died, Jan. 7, '63, at hospital, Relay House, Ma.; also 
borne as Li men. 

HILL, TIMOTHY. Age, 32. Enlisted, Julv 27, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. IS, '65. 

HINCKLEY, FREDERICK J. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Essex; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; captured at Fair Oaks; 
paroled, March 2, '65; discharged, June 17, '05, at Albany, N. Y. 

HINCKLY, RODOLPHUS. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at North Elba; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; corporal, May 25, '65; mustered out with company, as Hinkley. 

HO AG, NATHANIEL P. Age, 41. Enlisted, July 22. '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 16, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick at Fort 
Monroe, Ya., at muster-out of company. 

HOAG, THOMAS. Age, 23. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. G, Sept. 6, '64; mustered out with company. 

HOBBS, JOSEPH M. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Ellcnburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 
'64. 

HOFF, EMORY A. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 14, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no date; killed 
at Cold Harbor; also borne as HatT. 

HOGAN, EDWARD. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 11 '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

HOLBROOK, LYMAN C. Age, 42. Enrolled at Plattsburgh; fust lieu- 
tenant, Co. I, Aug. 21, '62; discharged, Feb. 7, '63; also borne as Lyman 
G. Hoolbrok. 

HOLLEY, ALFRED H. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Horicon ; private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; appointed drummer, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Holly and Hawley. 

HOLLOND, JOHN. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Dannemora ; private, 
Co. B, Au£. 8, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Cold Har- 
bor; also borne as Holland. 

HOOEY, THOMAS. . Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aim. 29, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, May 28, '65, at hos- 
pital, Fort Monroe; also borne as iloovcy, Hovey and Howey. 

HOPKINS, ALONZO S. Age. 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Queensbury ; 
private, Co. A. Aim. 29. '62; died of typhoid fever, July 19, '63, at Balfour 
Hospital, Portsmouth, Ya. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 245 

HOTCHXISS, ALFRED. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. 1), Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of 
company; also borne as Alfred H. Ilodgkis and Holdkins. 

HOTCHKISS, ARTHUR. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 22, '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

HOUBON, PATRICK. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Moriah; private; 
Co. Fj Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital at muster-out of company, 
also borne as Haubon, Hubin and Hubon. 

HOWARD, LEVERETT. Age, 35. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Dec. 16, '63; missing in action at Drury's Bluff; supposed 
died in prison. 

HOWARD, STANDISH. Age. IS. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. 
E, Dec. 24, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

HOWE, NORTON M. Age, 30. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as How. 

HOWES, EDGAR C. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; mustered out with company. 

HOWES, LEWIS E. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 1 , '62, at Pittsburgh ; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 12, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, no 
date, at hospital. 

HOYLE, VALENTINE, Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, March 29, '63, at Camp 
Adirondack, Washington; also borne as Hogel and II ogle. 

HUBBARD, CLIFFORD. Age, IS. Enrolled, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; quartermaster-sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; second 
lieutenant, Co. C. Dec. 24, '64; first lieutenant and adjutant, May 22, ^o] 
mustered out with regiment. 

HUBBELL, ALLEN D. Age, 24. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Feb. 2S, '63, at Camp 
Adirondack, Washington. 

HUFF, WILLIAM D. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Elizabcthtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died 
of his wounds, May 23, '64, at Richmond, Va. 

HULGATE, FRANK. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Altona; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged, May 18, 'tip, 
at Albany, N. Y. 

HULL, WILLIAM E. Age, 29. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Queensbury; 
drummer, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; no further record. 

HUMPHREY, EDWARD L. Age, 27. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. I, 
Nov. 27, 'ti'S; killed July 30, '64, near Petersburg, Va. 

HYDE, JOHN E. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Chazy; private. Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; appointed fifer and returned to company as private, no 
dates; discharged, June 3, } ti~i, at Petersburg, from hospital. Point of Rocks. 

INGLESTON, WILLIAM. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62. at Crown Point; 

private, Co. E, Aulj. 30, '62; discharged, June 21, '65, at hospital, Albany, 

N. Y. 
INGRAM, TARQUIN. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 27, '62, at Horicon; private, 

Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, Feb. 27, '65; mustered out with company; 

also borne as Larquin Ingrahm. 



246 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

IRISH, EBER F. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Quecnsburv; private. 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of congestion, Oct. 2G, '62, at Fort Ethan 
Allen, Va. 

JACQUES, IRVING. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 7, '63, at hos- 
pital, Washington; also borne as Jaquis and Jaquish." 

JAMES, ADOLPHUS. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Westporfc private, 
Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; mustered out with company. 

JANDROW, PETER. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. A; 
Nov. 30, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Jar. grow and 
Jangro. 

JARVIS, FREDERICK. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 14, '62; no further record. 

JARVIS, JOSEPH. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 17, '64, at Newark, N. J., 
private, Co. G, Oct.' 20, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

JAUNDRO, LEVI. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Cbamplain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Oct. 15, '64, at Fort Monroe. 

JELLY, FILMORE. Age, 38, Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Chazy; private, Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 7, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe; also 
borne as Fillmon Jelley. 

JELLY, PETER. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chazy; private. Co. B, 
Aug. 13, '62; died of typhoid fever, April 2, '63, at Camp Adirondack, 
Washington; also borne as Jelley. 

JENKINS, ORANGE F. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Elizabeth town; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; absent on sick furlough at muster-out of 
company. 

JENKS, EBENEZER N. Age, 38. Enlisted. July 28, '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; deserted, May 2, '63. 

JENNE, NEHEMIAH. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with compan3 r , as Jennie. 

JOHNDRO, FRANKLIN. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. S, '62, at Queensbury; 

private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Franklin J. Jandro, Jandrow and Jahandro; awarded medal of honor for 
- meritorious service at Fort Harrison. 

JOHNSON, DE ESTAING. Age, IS. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Queens- 
bury-; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

JOHNSON, FRANK. Age, 21. Enlisted, Dec. 17. '63, at Willsboro; private, 
Co. II, Dec. 20, '63; wounded, at Drury's Bluff; mustered out by order 
of War Department, dated May 3, '65. 

JOHNSON, HENRY M. Age, 31. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; 
private, Co. 1, Dec. 22, '63; wounded, at Fort Harrison; died of wounds, 
Oct. 22, '64, at Fort Monroe. 

JOHNSON, HOLLIS. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 8. '62, at Chester; private. 

Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, April 2, '63; died of fever, July 16. '63, at 

hospital, Portsmouth, Va. 
JOHNSON, IRWIN. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 8. '62, at Chester; private. 

Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Irvin. 

JOHNSON, LYMAN. Ace. 29. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru: private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, to date June -i, '05, at Petersburg, Yu. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 247 

JONES, ALBERT E. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black B'rook; 
as private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; sergeant., May 10, '64; mustered out with 
company. 

JONES, EPHRAIM A. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 19, '64, at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 16, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Ephraim JR. 

JONES, JOHN. Age. 42. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 5, '6o, at Washington. 

JOOTRAW, NICHOLAS. Age, 20. Enlisted, Julv 30. '62. at Ausable; 
private. Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; no record subsequent to Dec. 31, '63. 

JORDAN, JOHN. Age, 21. Enlisted, Julv 19, '62, at Queensburv; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, May 3, '64, to enter the Navy." 

JOYNER, FLETCHER. Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Peru; private. 
Co. K. Aug. 15. '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
sergeant, Nov. 9, '63; discharged for disability, no date, as Joiner. 

JUNE, JAMES. Age, 40. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. H, Dec. 
10, '63; wounded at Dniry's Bluff; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

KAIN, NELSON. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 2, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe, as 
Kaier; also borne as Keir, Keis and Kiev. 

KEESE, JR., OLIVER. Age, 33. Enrolled at New York City; lieutenant- 
colonel. Aug. 21, '62; colonel, Aug. 12, '63; discharged for disability, 
Sept. 16, '64; also borne as Kesse and Keys. 

KEITH, ALFRED. Age, 37. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at St, Armand; private, 
Co. C. Aug. 17, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
corporal, April 15, '63; discharged, June 5, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

KEITH, SULLIVAN. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 19, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Feb. 15, '63, at Camp Adirondack, 

Washington. 

KELLOGG, ROWLAND C. Age, IS. Enrolled, July 28, '62, at Elizabeth- 
town; private, Co. F, Aug. 16, '62; commissary sergeant, Aug. 29, '62> 
second lieutenant, Co. D, Nov. 24, '62; first lieutenant, Jan. 17, '63 J 
wounded. June 15, '64; discharged, June 20. '64, for appointment as cap- 
tain and commissary of subsistence of U. 8. Volunteers. 

KELLY, JOHN. Age, 24. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one year; private. 
Co. I, Aug. 23, '64; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, n date; discharged, 
June 13, '65, at Annapolis. 

KELLY, THOMAS. Age, 20. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; private. 
Co. I, Dec. 23, '63; wounded at Fort Harrison; died of wounds, Oct. 23, 
'64, at Fort Monroe. 

KENDALL, JAMES. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 8, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62: returned to ranks, 
April 1, '63; discharged with detachment, June 3, '65, at Washington. 

KENEDY, ANDREW. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62. at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died, Oct. 3, '63, at Regimental Hospital, 
Norfolk. 

KENNEDY, JOHN. Age, 35. Enlisted. Julv 31, '62, at Dannemora; cor- 
poral, Co. I. Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

KENNEDY, MACOMB. Ace, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Elizabeth town; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Aug. 24, '63, at 
Finley Hospital, Washington, as McComb. 



248 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

KENT, GEORGE H. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 19, '02, at St. Armand: 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to Co. 
G, 19th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; discharged for dis- 
ability caused from wounds, April 1, '05, at Fort Porter, Buffalo, X. Y. 

KENT, WESLEY. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02, at Ellenburgh; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '02; promoted sergeant, Aug. 29, '02; killed in skirmish, 
May 12, '04, on Richmond and Petersburg Pike. 

KETCH, JAMES L. Age, 32. Enlisted, July 29. '02, at Cha/y; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '02; corporal, Aug, 29, '02; sergeant and returned to ranks, 
no date; discharged for disability, June IS, '05, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

KETTENBAH, HENRY C. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02. at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Kelenbak and Kittenbah. 

KIERNAN, WILLIAM. Age. 25. Enlisted. Aug. 13. '02, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, April 1, '63. 

KILBORN, JOHN. Age. 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Willsboro: private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died of his wounds, no 
date. 

KING, DANIEL. Age. 21. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '02, at Horicon: private. Co. 
D, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, Dec. 25, "03; discharged, May IS, '65, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

KING, FRANCIS. Age, 38. Enlisted, July 20, '02. at Chazv; private. Co. 
B, Aug. 13, '02; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with 
company. 

KING, JAMES A. Age, 29. Enlisted. Aug. 6, '65, at Stony Creek; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 15, '63. 

KING, JOHN E. Age, 27. Enlisted. Aug. S. '02. at Chester; private, Co. 
D, Aug. 29, '02; discharged May IS, '05, at Albany. X. Y. 

KING, LOUIS. Age. 42. Enlisted, July 25. '02, at Pittsburgh; private. 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Nov. 30, '02, at hospital, 
as Lewis King. 

KING, NORMAN J. Age, 20. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '02, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, June 27, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

KING, NORMAN W. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 5. ! 02. at Chester: private, 
Co. D, Aug. IS, '02; died of congestion of lungs, March 20, '03, at hospital, 
Camp Adirondack, Washington. 

KING, SAMUEL L. Age, IS. Enlisted. July 25, '02, at Schroon: private. 

Co. E. Aug. 30, '02; "died of heart disease, Sept. 13, '03, at Gloucester 

Point, Va. 
KENYON, POTTER W. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 24, '02. at Schroon; 

private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '02; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; sergeant, Jan. 19, '63; 

discharged, July 14, "05, at hospital, Albany, N. Y'.; also borne as Kinyon. 

KNOX, HENRY T. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '62, at Champlain; private. 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; discharged. Jan. 12, '64, for promotion to first lieu- 
tenant. Second Cavalry, Colored Troops. 

KNOX, MARTIN V. B. Age. 20. Enlisted, Aug. 2. '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E. Aim. 21, '62; corporal, Jan. 10. '63; discharged, Eeb. 27, '04. for 
promotion in 33d Regiment, Colored Troops. 

KNOX, TIMOTHY C. Age. 40. Enlisted, July 27. '02. at Schroon: private. 
Co. E, Aug. 19. '02; musician. Aug. 30, '02; returned to company as 
private, no date; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps before May 1, '64; 
repotted discharged, Sept. 26, '64. 






fc 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 249 

LABARGE, AUGUSTUS. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Labargo 
and Laberge. 

LABELLE, JOSEPH. Age, 30. Enlisted. Aug. 6, '62, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 21, '62; transferred to Co. B, no date; to Co. E, Aug. 26, '62; 
wounded, no date; mustered out with company. 

LABOUNTY, SIMEON. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 16, '03, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. K, Dec. 17. '63; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '65; 
also borne as Labounty, Jr. 

LADD, EDWIN L. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, May 8, '63, at Washington. 

LADDY, JAMES. Aw, 18. Enlisted at Black Brook;- private, Co. E, 
Dec. 24, '63; wounded, no date; died of wounds, July 2, '64, at Field Hos- 
pital, ISth Army Corps. 

LADOO, LEVI. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Qucensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

LADUE, ABRAM. Age, 21.. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Willsboro; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged in June, '65, at Hospital, Fort Monroe, as 
Abraham Ladieu; also borne as Ladoo and Ludicu. 

LADUE, JOHN H. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 29, '62. at Essex; private. Co. 
F, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Nov. 22, '62, at Simpson Hospital, 
near Relay House, Md. 

LAFAYETTE, HENRY. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '02, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

LAFAYETTE, LEWIS. Age, 19. Enlisted. July 30. '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff, Va.J discharged June 3, 
'65, at Washington, D. C; also borne as Louis Lafayette. 

LAFLAM, FRANCIS. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Dannemora; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 25, '63, at 
Finley Hospital, Washington. 

LAGARE, LOUIS. Age, 22. Enlisted in July, '64, at New Jersey; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 24, '64; transferred to Co. B, 90th Infantry, June 13, '05. 

LAGWAY, JOHN. Age, 45. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '03, at Jay; private, Co. 
D, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 90th Infantry, June 13, '65; also borne as 
Lazaway and Lazway. 

LAJOR, FRANCIS. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; died, Aug. 29, '04, at 
Andersonville, Ga.; also borne as Lagoy and Lajoy. 

LAMB, JAMES. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Horicon; private, Co. 
D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

LAMB, JOHN W. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at North Hudson; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, !02; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; sergeant, June 28, '04; 
captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 9, '05. at Aiken's Landing, Ya.; 
discharged, June 29, '65, at Hospital, West Philadelphia, Fa.; also borne 
as George W. 

LAMB, LEVI S. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Keene; private. Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no dale; sergeant, January 17, '05; mustered 
out with company. 

LAMBERT, LAWRENCE. A-je, 19. Enlisted, Dec. 17, '63, at Willsboro; 
private, Co. D, Dee. 20, '63; wounded at Cold Harbor; transferred t > 90th 
Infant rv. 



250 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

LAMBERTON, JOHN E. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '02, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, April 27, '63, at Ecking- 
ton Hospital, Washington. 

LAMOREAUX, MOSES. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Lamrie. 

LAMORIE, JULIUS. Age, 29. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62, at Wilmington; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died of disease, April 14, '65, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe; also borne as Larnoni and Lamoy. 

LAMORY, see Lamoy. 

LAMOY, GEORGE B. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died at Hampton Hospital, Va., no date. 

LAMOY, HENRY. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Black Brook: pri- 
vate, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, May 16, '64; sergeant, April 30, '65; 
mustered out with company. 

LAMOY, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Jay; private. Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with company. 

LAMOY, MARSHALL. Age. IS. Enlisted, Dee. 21, '63, at Essex; private, 
Co. E, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

LAMOY, WILLIAM. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Black Brook: 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Lamory. 

LAMOY, WILLIAM. A<re, 41. Enlisted. Dec. 21, '63, at Essex private, 
Co. E, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

LAMPMAN, HIRAM. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62, at Westport private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, April IS, '63, at Camp Adirondack, Wash- 
ington, D. C; apprehended, no date; at hospital, Fort Monroe, Aug. 31, 
'65, prisoner. 

LAPAN, ABRAM. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at ^aranac; private. Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; died, July 7, '64, at Hampton Hospital, Va.; also borne 
as Abraham. 

LAPAUL, STEPHEN. Age, IS. Enlisted at Harpersfield; private. Co. A. 
Feb. 28, ^o', transferred ro 96th Infantry, June 13. '65; also borne as 
Laparl. 

LAPEER, STEPHEN. Age, 37. Enlisted, Dec. 31. '63, at Chazy; private, 
Co. G, Jan. 4, '64; killed at Cold Harbor; also borne as Lapere and Lassene. 

LAPERARIE, NAPOLEON. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 17, '65, at hospital, Albany, 
N. Y.; also borne as Napoleon B. Lafferarie and Loprorie. 

LAPIERRE, JR., JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 31. '63, at Chazy; 
private, Co. B, Jan. 4, '64; wounded at Drury's BIutT; discharged for 
wounds, Oct. 15, '64, at David's Island, X. Y., as Lapiere. 

LAPOINT, CASS C. Age, 19. Enlisted. July 18, '62, at Queensbury; cor- 
poral, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, no dale; wounded, at Forr Harrison: 
discharged for disability, Feb. 28, '65, at Hospital, Willett's Point, X. Y.; 
also borne as I.opoiut; commissioned as brevet 2d lieutenant. 

LAROSE, LEWIS. Age, 19. Enlisted, July is. '62, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29. '62; appointed rlfer, and returned to company, as private, 
no dates; mustered out with company. 

LASHAWAY, ANDREW. Age, is. Enlisted at Seneca Falls, to serve one 
year; private, unassigned, March 16, '65; discharged, May 9, Y>5, at El- 
mira, N. Y. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER - 251 

LASKEY, MALICHL Age, 34. Enlisted, July 20, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 2, '65, Hospital. Fort Monroe. 

LATHAM, WILLARD. A<re, 19. Enlisted, Julv 29, '02, at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, Nov. 24, '62. 

LATURE, JEREMIAH. Age, 39. Enlisted, Dec. 16, '03, at Pittsburgh; 
private. Co. D, Dee. 17, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

LATZ, HENRY. Age, 37. Enlisted at Avon, to serve one year; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 27, '64; discharged with detachment, May 28, '65, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe. 

LAVARNWAY, SAMUEL. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 2s, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private. Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drurv's Bluff, died of wounds 
same day, at Field Hospital, as Lavaunway; also borne as Levanway and 
Levarnway. 

LAVARNWAY, THOMAS. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Levanway and Levarnway. 

LAVONTURE, DAVID. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62: died of typhoid fever, March S, '63, at Regi- 
mental Hospital, Washington. 

LAWRENCE, FRANKLIN. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Crown Point; 
private. Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; died of disease, May 6, '64, at hospital, 
Portsmouth, V.a. 

LAZWAY, WILLIAM H. Age. 23. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Bolton: private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62: deserted. April 13, '63, at Government Warehouse, 
, near railroad depot, Washington; also borne as Layway. 

LEARY, TIMOTHY. Age. 42. Enlisted, July 31. '62, at Dannemora; 
private. Co. B, Aug. 8, '62. transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged 
for disability, March 29, '65, in the field, Va. 

LEAVITT, ERASTUS W. Age, 23. Enlisted, Jan. 1, '64, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. C, Jan. 4, '64; killed at Drury's Bluff, Va.; also borne as 
Levitt. 

LEGGETT, JEROME B. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, to date May 23, '63. 

LEVINE, ALEXANDER. Age, 19. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. 
H, Nov. 11, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '65; also borne as 
Lavene and Lavine. 

LEWIS, EDGAR. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Jay; private. Co. C, 
Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; discharged. May 31, '65, at 
hospital. Fort Monroe. 

LINCOLN, CHARLES A. Age. 33. Enlisted, Aug. 12. '62, at Warrensburgh; 
private. Co. G, Aug. 20. '62: corporal, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, 
no d;ite: discharged, June 23, '(jo, from Balfour I'. S. Hospital, Ports- 
mouth, Va. 

LINCOLN, EDGAR E. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 4. '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30. '62; corporal. March 30. '03; discharged. June 3, 
'05. from Balfour Hospital, Portsmouth, Va.; also borne as Charles E. 

LINDSAY, FREEMAN D. Age 24. Enlisted. Aug. 14. "62. at North Hud- 
son; private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '02; promoted sergeant, Au<r. 30, '62: firs* 
sergeant, June 28, '64; mustered out with company; also borne as Lindsle.y. 

LINDSAY, MARTIN. Age, 25. Enlisted, Julv 30, '62, at Chesterfield; 
private Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Fort Harrison, Va.; also borne as 
Lvndsev. 



252 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

LINDSAY, THOMAS. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 14. '62, at Chesterfield; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 26, '65, from Balfour Hos- 
pital, Portsmouth, Va.; also borne as Lyndsey. 

LING, JAMES S. Age, 30. , Enlisted, Dec. 16, '63, at Jay; private, Co. C, 
Dec. 17, ; 63; wounded at Cold Harbor; transferred to Forty-sixth Com- 
pany, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, Mav 8, '65; mustered 
out, July 12, '65, hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

LISCOMB, ADAM C. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62. at Jav; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 17, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, March 24, '64, for pro- 
motion to captain, 23d Infantry, Colored Troops. 

LITTLE, STEPHEN B. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Qucensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, and discharged for promotion to 
second lieutenant in 96th Infantry, April 13, '64; killed at Cold Harbor. 

LITTLE JOHN, JAMES W. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug, 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
James H. and William \V. 

LIVINGSTON, ROBERT WILSON. Age, 52. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; 
captain, Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; wounded severely, twice, at Drury's Bluff. 
His lieutenant, Stevenson, was killed while aiding Captain L. from the 
field. Was in hospital at Fortress Monroe for more than a year. Mus- 
tered out as of date of muster out of company. 

LOCKERBY, WILLIAM. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, to date May 1, '63. 

LONERGAN, OLIVER. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 21, '62; transferred to Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal^ 
April 2, '63; sergeant, Jan. 15, '65; mustered out with company. 

LORD, MAHLON. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensburv; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, May 30, '65, at Norfolk, Va. 

LOZWAY, H. ANTHONY. Age, 45. Enlisted, Dec. 18, '63, at Jay; private, 
Co. G, Dec. 22, T 63; discharged, June 2, '65, at Hospital, Fort Monroe, as 
St. Anthony Lazway; also borne as Lashway. 

LUCK, EDSON S. Age, '28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

LYNCH, JOHN. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Jay; private, Co. C, 
Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Sept. 5, '62, at Baltimore, Md. 

LYON, SEYMOUR. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 8. '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Feb. 17, 
'64, at Yorktown, Va. 

McALLEY, RUSSELL. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 27, ^o, at Hospital, 
Fort Monroe; also borne as McCaulley and McColley. 

McARTER, GEORGE. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal and returned to ranks, no dates; 
mustered out with company, as McCarter. 

McAULEY, JOHN. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Crown Point; pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62: wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with 
company; also borne as John S. 

McBAIN, JOHN. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 13, "62, at Champlain; private. 
Co. I, Aim. 29. '62; died of typhoid fever, Oct. 31, '63, at Hampton llos- 
pital, Fort Monroe; also borne as McLane and McLean. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 253 

McCALLEN, JAMES. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; died of typhoid fever, Sept. 22, '63, at Eckington Hos- 
pital, Washington; also borne as McCullen. 

McCANNA, JOHN. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; pri- 
vate, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; died, April 17, 'Co, at hospital, Fort Monroe; 
also borne as McAnna and McCawne. 

MCCARTHY, JAMES. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Warrensburch; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, Dec. 18, '6-1, at hospital, Point of Rocks, 
Va.; also borne as McCarty. 

McCORMICK, JAMES. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

McCORMICK, WILLIAM. Age, 20. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. H, Feb. 28, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

McCREADY, EUGENE. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62. at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, June 19, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 




McCUNE, JOHN P. Age, 41. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. I, Dec. 22, 
'63; wounded at Cold Harbor; absent, sick, since Oct. 27, '64, and at 
j muster-out of company; also borne as John McCane. 

McDAVITT, JAMES. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Champlain; pri- 
vate, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with company; 
also borne as McDavid and McDevitt. 

, McDONALD, JOSEPH. Age, 27. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Moriah; pri- 
vate, Co. F, Dec. 16, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

McDONALD, SYLVESTER. Age. 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Stony 
Creek; private, Co. G. Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Co. D, 19th Regiment, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 23, '63; discharged, July 13, '65, at Elmira, 
N. Y.; also borne as McDonnel. 

McDONOUGH, ALBERT. Age, 32. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury*s Bluff; mustered out with 
company; also borne as McDonald. 

{ McDOUGALL, HENRY. Age. 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
drummer, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; returned to company as private, no date; 
mustered out with company; also borne as McDugal. 

McDOWELL, SAMUEL. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 4. '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date: deserted Sept. 22. '64, 
from hospital, Willett's Point, N. Y. Harbor; also borne as McDonell. 

McFADDEN, DARIUS. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; promoted corporal, no date; mustered out with 
company. 

McFADDEN, EDWIN. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 6. '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 15, '65, at hospital, 
Fort Monroe; also borne as Edward. 

McFADDEN, GEORGE. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; private, 

Co. B. Aug. 29, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Sept. 15, '64, at Base Hos- 
pital, Ya. 
McGOWAN, PETER. Age, 24. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. B, Sept. 5, '64; mustered out with company, as McGown. 



254 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

McGOWN, JAMES. Ace. 23. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at. Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
MeGowan. 

McGOV/N, MICHAEL. Ase. 36. Enlisted. July 23, '62, at Plattsbur-h; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with companv; also borne as 
MeGowan and McGowen. 

McKAY, JOHN. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. C, Nov. 
30, '63; wounded, no date; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

McKINNEY, DANIEL. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Me Kenny. 

McKINNEY, HARVEY. 4ge, 19. Enlisted., Aug. 22, '62, at Peru: private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as McKenny. 

MCLAUGHLIN, JOHN W. Ase, 42. Enlisted. July 24, '62, at St. Armand: 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Laughlin. 

McLEAN, PHILIP V. N. Age, 36. Enrolled, Aug. 12, '62. at Ausable: 
private, Co. K. Aug. 19, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; first sergeant, no 
date; second lieutenant. Co. A, Jan. 14, '64; transferred to Co. D, May 1, 
'64; mustered out with company; also borne as Philip V. H. 

McLENATHEN, WILLIAM H. Age. IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Jay; 
private, Co. C, Aug;. 29, '62; wounded and promoted corporal, no dates; 
discharged for disability, May 27, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe; also borne 
as McClenathan, McClennetthan, McLanathan and Mcl.ennithan. 

MACLURKIN, DANIEL W. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Black 
Brook; private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also 
borne as McClerkin and McClurkin. 

McMANNIS, PHILIP. Age, 23. Enlisted at Harrietstown: to serve one 
year; private, Co. F, Oct. S, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry, as McManus. 

McMULLIN, JAMES. Age, 22. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Champlain; pri- 
vate. Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; corporal, June 1, '65; 
mustered out with company. 

MACOMBER, JOHN. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Ausable; private. 
Co. K. Aug. 30, '62; mustered out. May 17. '65. at David's Island. New 
York Harbor; also borne as MeComber and McOmber. 

McREA, LEWIS. Age, 35. Enlisted. Dee. IS. '63, at Jay. to serve three 
years; mustered in as private, Co. G, Dee. 22, '63; wounded at Drury's 
Bluff; discharged for wounds, Oct. 19, '64, as McRey; also borne as 
McCrea. 

MADDISON, JAMES. Ace, 32. Enlisted at Lewis, to. serve three years; 
private, unassigned, Dec. 9, '63; no further record. 

MALLERY, WILLIAM. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A. Aug. 29, '62; wounded in action, no date; transferred t<> 
Co. G, 19th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, no date: discharged for 
disability from wounds, April 1, '65, at Fort Porter. Buffalo, X. Y.; also 

borne as Mallory. 

MANLEY, ELIJAH P. Ace, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62. at >aranac: private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, bo date; mustered 

out June 29, '65, at Annapolis, Md., as Manlay; also born. 4 as Manly. 

MANLEY, LYMAN. Age, 19. Enlisted at Saranae; private, Co. B, Dec 
Is. '03; killed at Drury's Bluff. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 255 

MANN, SAMUEL. Age, 20. Enlisted at Plattsbargh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. E, Sept. 2, '64; mustered out with company. 

MANOR, JOSEPH. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Plattsburgh; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; died, no date, at Hampton Hospital, Fort 
Monroe; also borne as Meroe and Monor. 

MANSFIELD, WILLIAM Q. Assistant' surgeon, from the 92d Infantry: 
surgeon of the USth regiment, April 20, '64; mustered out with regiment; 
also borne as William O. 

MARK, JAMES. Age, 43. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Chazy: private. Co. 
B. Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, Dee. 28, '63, at hospital, Hamp- 
ton, Va. 

MARSHALL, GEORGE W. Aire. 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11. '62, at Elizabeth- 
town; private, Co. F, Aucr. 21, '62: sevgeant. Aug. 29. '62; discharged for 
disability, Jan. 14, '63, at Post Hospital, Relay House, Md. 

MARTIN, EBENEZER. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug, L, '62. at Ellenburudi: 
private, Co. B. Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

MARTIN, GEORGE M. Age, 20. Enlisted. Deo. 29, '63. at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Dec. 29, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

MARTIN, IRA. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dee. 20, '63, at Essex; private. Co. E, 
Dec. 22, '63: died of disease, Feb. 21, '65, at hospital, Point of Rocks, Va. 

MARTIN, NELSON. Age, 26. Enlisted at Plattsbursih; to serve one 
year; private, Co. E, Jan. 31, '05; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

MARTIN, PETER. Age, 30. Enlisted. July 31, '62, at Peru: private. Co. 
K, Aug. 30, '62; died. April 19, '63, at Eckington Hospital, Washington. 

MARTINOW, ANTONLE. Ace. 43. Enlisted at Plattsbursh, private, 
Co. A, Xov. 30, '63; discharged for disability, May 11, '65, at Manchester, 
Va., as Antoine Martino. 

MARTINOW, JOSEPH. Aire, IS. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private. Co. 
A, Nov. 30. '63; transferred to Co. A, 90th Infantry, June 13, '65; also 
borne as Martino and Martno. 

MASON, ABRAHAM. Age. 2S. Enlisted, Dee. 14, '63, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. H. Dec. 23, '(Y6: died in July, '64, at Hampton Hospital, Va.: 
also borne as Abram. 

MASON, LAEAYETTE. Ace, 3S. Enlisted. Dee. 21. '63. at Elizabethrown; 
private, Co. G, Dee. 23, '63: captured at Pair Oaks; paroled, March 9, '65, 
at Aiken's Landing, Va.; mustered out, to date June 14, '6.5, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

MASON, WILLIAM. Aire. 37. Enlisted. Dec. 16, '63, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. H, Dec. 23. '63; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

MATEVEY, JOHN. Ace, 23. Enlisted, July 20, '62, at Plattsburgh; pri- 
vate, Co. H, July 31, '62; no further record. 

MATOON, LEWIS S. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; 
private. Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 
Co. A. Seventh Regiment. Veteran Reserve Corns, no date; discharged 

about June 21, '65, at Washington; also borne as Louis Mattoon. 

MATOTT, JOSEPH. Age, 30. Enlisted, Dec. 17, '63, at Essex: private, 

Go. E, Dec. 22. '63; transferred to 90th Infantry, June 13, '65; also borne 

as Matott and Mat tot. 
MATTEAU, JOSEPH. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 28, '02. at Chazy; priv; 

Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 20, '63, at Eckinj 

Hospital, Washington, D. C; also borne as Mattaw. 



256 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

MATTOON, SYLVESTER. Age, 24. Enrolled, Aug. 12, '62, at Platts- 
burgh; second lieutenant, Co. H, Aug. 21, '62; discharged, June 4, '63; 
also borne as Matoon. 

MAXIM, SAMUEL. Age, 40. Enlisted, Julv 31, '62, at Warrcnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, March 30, '63; captured at Fair 
Oaks; died, Feb. 16, '65, at Salisbury, N. C; also borne as Mack and 
Maxime. 

MAY, HORACE P. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; absent, 
sick in hospital, at muster-out of company. 

MAYO, SAMUEL L. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded nnd captured in action at Drury's 
Bluff; died of wounds, May 19, '64, at Richmond, Va. 

MEAD, REUBEN W. Age, 2S. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 18,' '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
corporal, March 31, '65; transferred to 55th Company, Second Battalion, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; mustered out, Aug. 28, '65, at Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

MEHAN, JOHN. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; missing since Fort Harrison; also borne as Mahan 
and Menan; supposed captured and died in prison. 

MENN, ELIG. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; private, Co. I, 
Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company as Alexander Manor; also borne 
as Manoe and Maror. 

MERRIAM, WILLIAM H. Private from 169th Infantry; commissioned, not 
mustered, second lieutenant; promoted to 1st lieutenant 169th New York 
Infantry. 

MERRILL, JAMES M. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 28, '63, at North Elba; 
private, Co. C, Jan. 2, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

MERRILL, MARLON C. Age, 18. Enlisted. Dec. 19, '63, at Bolton; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Jan. 5, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry, while supposed to be 
a prisoner of war. 

MERRILL, NEWTON CHARLES. Ace, 20. Enlisted, Atig. 7, '62, at 

Westport; private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, March 13, '63; died of 
typhoid fever, Aug. 27, '63, at Gloucester Point Hospital, Va.; prior serv- 
ice, 1st Vermont. 

•MERRILL, SHUBAEL P. Age. 41. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at North Elba; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

MICKLE, ARAD B. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; captured July 4, '63, at South Anna Bridge; paroled; 
mustered out with company. 

MILES, SETH. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at North Hudson; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; di^char^ed, no date. 

MILLER, ANTHONY. Ace, 31. Enlisted, Dec. 9, '63, at Jay; private, 
Co. D, Dec. 22, '63; captured at Drury's Bluff and supposed died in prison. 

MILLER, FRANCIS. Age, 42. Enlisted. July 30, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; abseut, sick in hospital, at muster-out of 
company. 

MILLER, GEORGE W. Age, 37. Enlisted, Dec. 13, '63, at Moriah; pri- 
vate, Co. F, Dec. 15, '03; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died 
of wounds, July 1, '04, at Richmond, Va. 



INDIVIDUAL ROSTER SERVICE 



zo / 



V 



MILLER, JAMES B. Age, 26. Enlisted, Sept, 27, '04, at Malone, to 
serve one year; private, Co. F, Oct. 1, '04; mustered out with company. 

MILLER, JAMES S. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Pittsburgh; pri- 
vate, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Co. I, 10th Regiment, Veteran 
Reserve Corps, Feb. 14, '05; discharged with detachment, Julv 24, '05, at 
Buffalo, NY. > - > > 

MILLER, PHILIP. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '02, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 10, '02; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; sergeant, no date; killed at 
Dniry's Bluff. 

MILLIS, HENRY M. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02, at Queensbury; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; wounded in action, July 4, '63, at South Anna 
Bridge, Va.; died of his wounds, July 7, '03, in ambulance, near White 
House, Va. 

MINER, CHARLES W. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 20, '02, at Chazv; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; died of tvphoid fever, Oct. 1, '03, at hospital, Fort 
Schuyler, X. Y. 

MINER, JR., CLEMENT S. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Chazy; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, ''02; absent, sick in 
hospital, Fort Monroe, at muster-out of company. 

MINER, LOUIS. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. IS, '03. at Black Brook; private, 
Co. H, Dec. 24, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry; also borne as Minor. 

MINER, THOMAS E. Age, 30. Enlisted, Nov. 17, '03, at Plattsbursh; 
private, Co. B, Nov. 30, '03; mustered out, July 3, '05, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe; also borne as Thomas C. and Minor. 

MINER, WILLIAM. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private. Co. H, 
Nov. 28, '03; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for disability from 
wounds, March 23, '05, in the field; also borne as Minor. 

MINNIE, ELMORE. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '02, at Saranac; private. 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; died of typhoid fever, Aug. 23, '03, at Gloucester 
Point, Va., as Miner. 

MISSUE, THOMAS. Age, 34. Enlisted, July 9, '02, at St. Armand; pri- 
vate, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; wounded at Fort Harrison; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Meshue, Messhue, Mishew and Missac. 

MITCHEL, PETER. Age, 3S. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '02, at Johnsburgh; pri- 
vate, Co. D, Aug. 14, '02; no further record. 

MITCHELL, CARTER. Age, 19. Enlisted at Pittsburgh: private, Co. D, 
Dec. 23, '03; died of disease, Sept. 2, '04, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

MITCHELL, JOHN. Age, 24. Enlisted, July 30, '02, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '02; no further record. 

MIX, LEONARD. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Moriah; private, Co. 
F, Aug. 29, '62; killed, at Cold Harbor; also borne as Minx. 

MOLBURN, GODFREY. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Pittsburgh; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; captured at Fair Oaks: paroled, no date; 

absent, sick, at muster-out of company; also borne as Malbern, Melboune 

and Melbourne. 
MONCRIEF, WARREN. Age, IS. Enlisted. July 29, '02, at Crown Point; 

private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; died of congestive chills, Sept. 15, '03, at 

Crown Point, N. Y.; also borne as Moncrirf and Montcrief. 

MONROE, BENJAMIN F. W. Age, 24. Enlisted Aug. 11, '02. at Johns- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Aug, 30, '02; wounded at Dniry's Bluff and Cold 
Harbor; died of wounds, July 1, '64, at hospital, as Munroe. 



258 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM. Age, 2S. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; captured at Fair Oaks; supposed died in 
prison at Salisbury, N. C. 

MONTY, ALLEN A. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; deserted, Nov. 25, '02, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. 

MONTY, LEROY. Age, hS. Enlisted. Aug. 4, '02, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Jan. 5, '03, at hospital, 
place not stated. 

MONTY, LOUIS. Age, 42, Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, no date, at hospital, place 
not stated, as Lewis Montey. 

MONTY, SEYMOUR. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out, June 9, '0-5, at Manchester, 
Va.; also borne as Montey. 

MONTY, WARREN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. S, '02, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, Nov. 23. '03; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, 
no date; absent, sick at Annapolis, Md., at muster-out of company. 

MONTY, WILLIAM H. Age. 30. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. I; 
Nov. 27, '63; wounded at Cold Harbor; no record subsequent to April 30, 
'65; supposed captured and died in prison. 

MOODY, RUSSELL. Age, 24. Enlisted at Chesterfield; private, Co. G, 
Dec. S, '03; discharged, Nov. 20, '04, at hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MOOERS, JOHN H. Age, 34. Enrolled at Albany; surgeon, Aug. 15, '02; 
discharged for disability* April 4, '04. 

MOONEY, HENRY. A,ge, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '03, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. H, Dec. 24, '03; wounded, no date; transferred to 90th In- 
fantry, June 13, '05. 

MOORE, FRANKLIN W. Age. 40. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; killed at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Franklin M. 

MOORE, JAMES H. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 15, '62; mustered out with company. 

MOORE, OLIVER H. Age, 32. Enlisted at Lewis, to serve one year: 
private, Co. B, Aug. 31, '04; wounded at Fort Harrison; mustered out 
with company. 

MOORE, SAMUEL J. Age, 29. Enlisted. Aug. 12. '02, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. II , Aug. 30, '02: captured at Drury's Bluff; supposed died in 
prison. 

MOORE, WILLIAM M. Ace, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '03. at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. K. Dec. 17, '0)3: wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for 
disability. March 2, '05, at Newark. N. J., as More. 

MORE, ROBERT. Age. 21. Enlisted, July 29, "02, at Crown Point: pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; died of typhoid fever, Get. 12, '03, at Yorktowri, 
Va.; also borne as Moore. 

MOREHOUS, OSCAR D. Age, 20. Enlisted, Auc 11. '02. at Essex; pri- 
vate, Co. F, Aug. 20, '02: corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, April 1, '03; 
captured at Fair Oaks and supposed died m prison. 

MOREHOUSE, WILLIAM. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Warrens- 
burgh; private, Co. O, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, March 2, 
'63, at Finley Hospital, Washington. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 259 

MORGAN, WILLIAM. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug 6, '02, at Elknburgh; 
private. Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; transferred to Thirtv-rirst Company, Second 
Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 20, '03; 'mustered out, 'Aug. 20, 
65, at Fort Monroe. 

MORRISON, JOHN. Age, 19. Enlisted at Black Brook; private,. Co. E, 
Dec. 22, '03; wounded, no date; transferred to 00th Infantry. 

MORRISON, JOSEPH. Age, 20. Enlisted. July 17, '02, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever. Oct, 20, '03, at hospital, 
York town, Va. 

MORSE, DAVID A. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at Lewis; private, Co. 
F, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, April 1, '03; discharged, June 2, '65, at Rich- 
mond; also borne as Morris. 

MORSE, LEWIS. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Elizabethtown; pri- 
vate, Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, no date; mustered out, May 20, '05, 
at Albany, N. Y. 

MOULD, HENRY M. Age, 19. Enrolled at Pittsburgh: second lieu- 
tenant, Co. K, Aug. 21, '02; discharged, July 29, '03; also borne as Mold. 

MULLIN, JEREMIAH. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 19, '02, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, July 17, '04; discharged for dis- 
ability, Oct. 20, '04. 

MURPHY, JAMES. Ago. 39. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '03, at Moriah: private. 
Co. D, Dec. 10, '03; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 7, '05; mus- 
tered out, Aug. 15, '05, at Albany, X. Y. 

MURRAY, DANIEL. Age, 33. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Queensburv; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 0, '02; no further record. 

MURRAY, GEORGE. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '02, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '02; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; sergeant, March 20, 
'63; first sergeant, Dec. 2, '04; mustered out, May 15, '05, at Galloup's 
Island, Boston Harbor, Mass. 

MURRAY, JOSEPH. Age, 25. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 31, '04; absent, missing at Fair Oaks; also borne as 
Murry; supposed died in prison. 

MURY, WILLIAM. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Moriah: private. 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as Murray 
and Murry. 

MUSSEN, HENRY. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Jay; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, Jan. 17, '05; mustered out with company. 

MUZZY, GEORGE W. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Saranac: pri- 
ll vate, Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29. '02; wounded in 
June, 1S04; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 2, '05; mustered out, 

June 28, '05, at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md.; also borne as J. W. 
' *■ • . 

MYERS, ANDREW J. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at Warrensburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company, as Myres, Jr. 

MYRES, MADISON. Age, Is. Enlisted at Pittsburgh: private. Co. C. 
Nov. 27. '03; transferred to 90th Infantry; also borne as Mvars and 
Myers. 

NEAL, RALSEY M. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Wilmington; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, July S, '05, at hospital, Albany, 
X. V.; also borne as Neil. 






2G0 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

NEDDO, JOHN B. • Age, 32. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 

private, Co. H, March 2, '05; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

NEDDO, JULIUS. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Ticonderoga; private, 

Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; absent in hospital at 
muster-out of company. 

NELSON, JOHN. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, Aug. 10, '03, at Gloucester Point, Va. 

NELSON, JOHN. ^ Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 23, '64, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 31, '04; mustered out with company. 

NEWELL, ELIAS H. Age, 44. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 30, 'G2; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Dec. 20, '03. 

NEWTON, CHARLES M. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02, at Ausable: 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, and returned to ranks, no dates; 
discharged, June 14, '05, at Richmond, Va. 

NEWTON, WILLIAM H. II. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at Ticon- 
deroga; private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; died of intermittent fever, Sept. 16, 
'03, at Hospital, Hampton, Va. 

NEYHART, ALPHEUS F. Age, date, place of enlistment and muster in as 
private, Co. F, not stated; mustered out, June 27, '65, at hospital, Alex- 
andria, Va. 

NICHOLS, FAYETTE. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, June 3, '65, at Richmond, Va. 

NICHOLS, GEORGE F. Age, 23. Enrolled at New York city; major, 
Aug. 21, '02; lieutenant-colonel, Aug. 12, '03; wounded at Drury's Bluff, 
and at Fort Harrison; colonel, Nov. 13, '04; mustered out with regiment. 

NICHOLS, GEORGE H. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Mooers; pri- 
vate, Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, no date; wounded at Drury's Bluff; 
sergeant, June 1, '05; mustered out with company. 

NICHOLSON, HENRY L. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 10, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '02; principal musician, Aug. 29, '02; no further 
record. 

NIGHTINGALE, FREDERICK W. Age, IS- Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02. at 

Champlain; private. Co. I. Aug. 29, '02; corporal, no date; captured at J 

Fair Oaks and supposed died in prison. 

NOLAN, JAMES. Ace, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 20. '03, at Black Brook; private, 
Co. B, Dec. 24, '03; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

NOLTON, BENJAMIN F. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Stony 
Creek; private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

NOLTON, JONATHAN C. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Stony 
Creek; private. Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered 
out with company. 

NORMAN, JOSHUA. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, June 9, '05, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

NORMAN, ROBERT. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C. Aug. 29, '02; wounded, no date; discharged, May 9, '05, 
at Albany, X. Y\ 

NORMAN, THOMAS. Age, 33. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, 02, mustered out with company. 



' 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 261 

NORMAND, CLODEMAR. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 9, V>2, at Champlairi; 

private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 24, '66, from Balfour Hos- 
pital, Portsmouth. Va., as Codman Norman. 

NORRIS, JOSIAH H. Age. 30. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain, Co. A, 
Aug. 10, '62; discharged, Jan. 1, '64. 

NORTHRUP, CLARK N. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug: 6, '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, Jun* 2, 'tio, at Balfour Hospital, 
I < Portsmouth, Va.; also borne as Northrop N. Clark. 

NORTHRUP, HENRY J. Age, 25. Enrolled, Aug. 12. '62. at Ausabie: 
private, Co. K, Aug. 19, '62; quartei master-sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; second 
lieutenant. Co. F, Feb. 25, '64; first lieutenant and quartermaster, Aug. 19, 
'64; mustered out with regiment. 

NORTON, DANIEL. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62. at Queensburv; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Coips, Aug. 28, 
'63; mustered out, June 23, '65, at Washington. 

NORTON, IRA. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Queensburv: private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; deserted Nov. 21, '62, from camp near Fort Ethan 
Allen, Va. 

NORTON, JOSEPH L. Ase, 22. Enlisted. July 29, '62, at Johnsburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died of typhoid fever, June 1, '63, at Hampton 
Hospital, Va. 

NOXON, HEMAN. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 28, '62. at Schroon; private. 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; wounded in June, '64; mustered 
out with company. 

NOYES, RICHARD. Age. 41. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

OBRIEN, WILLIAM. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Peru; private. 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES. Age, IS. Enlisted at Harpersteld; private, Co. A, 
Feb. 2S, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '65. 

O'CONNOR, DANIEL A. A^e. 21. Enrolled, Aug. 13. '62, at. Champb.in: 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29. '62; second lieutenant, Oct. 24. "64; capturea at 
Fair Oaks; paroled, Feb. '65; first lieutenant, Co. F, May 22, '65; mus- 
tered out with company; also borne as Dauiel O'Conncr. 

ODELL, JOSEPH W. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 8, '62, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; appointed fifer, Aug. 30, '62; discharged Jan. 
'64. 

ORMSBEE, CHARLES W. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Saranac; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, March 29, '63, at 
Camp Adirondack, Washington, as Ormsby. 

ORMSTON, JOHN. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah: private. 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison, Va.; died of wounds, Oct. 3, 
'64; also borne as Ormsbee. 

OSBORN, CHARLES H. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 5. '62, at Chester pri- 
vate, Co. D, Aug. 18, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, Jan. 15. '65; 
musten.-d out with company. 

OSTEYEE, LEWIS A. Age, 25. Enlisted at Moriah; private. Co. F. Dec. 
IS, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry: also borne as Ostegee and Ostyee. 

OTIS, SYLVESTER. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 23. '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 



262 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

OVARNEY, FRANCIS. Age, 27. Enlisted. Aug. IS, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 29. '62; deserted, Sept. 3, '62, at New York city; also 
borne as Orvaney and Overney. 

OUIMETTE, JAMES. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

OWEN, JOHN S. Age, 24. Enlisted, July 25. '62, at Wilmington: private, 
Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; corporal. Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with company as Owens. 

PAIGE, FRANKLIN T. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 22, '62, at Queensbury; 

private. Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Oct. 3, '63, at Hamp- 
ton Hospital, Va.; also borne as Franklin L. Page. 

PALMER, JAMES W. Age, 30. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, to date March 25, '64. 

PALMER, WILLIAM D. Age. 25. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A. Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 2, '65, from Balfour Hospital,- 
Portsmouth, Va. 

PALMER, WILLIAM H. Age, 18. Enlisted. Aug. 15, '62, at Pittsburgh; 

drummer, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

PANGBORN, JOHN T. Age.- IS. Enlisted at Moriah; private, Co. F, 
Dec. 12, } C)'o; died of chronic diarrhea, no date, at Annapolis, Md. 

PARDY, JAMES C. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Beekmantown; 
private, Co. FI, Aug. 10, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with 

company. 

PARK, SILAS. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at St. Armand; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

PARKER, ALBERT. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fair Oaks; discharged, June 7, '65, at 
hospital, Fort Monroe. . 

PARKER, ANTOINE. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. B, 
Dec. 2, 'dS; wounded at Fort Harrison; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

PARKER, GEORGE H. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Plattsburgh; 

private, Co. H, July 31, '62; no further record. 

PARKER, JEROME. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Jay; private, Co. 
E, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

PARKER, JOHN. Age. 20. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Jay; private, Co. E, 
Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

PARKIS, WILLIAM H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Warrensburch; 
private. Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to un- 
assigiied detachment of Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, Dec. 22, 
'64; mustered out, July 21, \'>5, at Rochester, N. Y. 

PARKS, RICHARD D. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. S. '62. at Mooers, to serve 
three years; mustered in as private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's 
Bluff/ 

PARMERTER, JACOB. Age, 41. Enrolled at Plattsburgh; captain, Co. 
E, Aug. 19, '62: wounded (lost a leg), June 3, '64, at Cold Harbor; dis- 
charged for disability, Dec. 15, '61. 

PARO, CARESE. Age, 37. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. 11, Aug. 30, "62; mustered out with company. 

PARO, EZRA. Ace, 30. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Ausable; private. Co. K, 
Aug. 30, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff; supposed died in prison. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 2G3 

PARR1SH, FLETCHER. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at Jay; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; returned to ranks, no date; 
mustered out/with company, as Fletcher C. 

PARR1SH, HIRAM. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 

C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, March 23, '63, at hospital, 
Georgetown, D. C. 

PARSONS, ANSELM V. Age, 24. Enlisted, Dec. 26, '63, at Altona; pri- 
vate, Co. B, Jan. 4, '64; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; mustered 
out June 29, '65, at Parole Camp, Annapolis, Md. 

PARSONS, SETH W. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62. at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant, no date; cap- 
tured at Fair Oaks: paroled, no date; mustered out June 29, 'Go, at Parole 
Camp, Annapolis, Md. 

PASKO, TRUMAN H. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Warrensburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; wounded at Cold Harbor; 

died of wounds, Julv 11, '64, at hospital, place not stated; also borne as 

Park. 
I 

PAY, SYLVANUS. Age, 18. Enlisted at Beekmantown; private, Co. H, 

Dec. 23, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Sylvenus L. Pave. 

PAYE, GEORGE W. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at St. Armand; pri- 
vate, Co. C, Aug. 17, 162; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, no date; ser- 
geant, May 2, '65; mustered out with company. 

PEABODY, DUDLEY R. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '62, at Luzerne; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

PEACOCK, WILLIAM. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at North Elba; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged May 25, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

PEARL, ALVERNA W. Age. IS. Enlisted. Aug. 18, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, March 1, '65; mustered out with company. 

PELOTT, LEWIS. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Horicon; private, Co. 

D, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Dec. 16, '63; also 
borne as Louis Pilot is and Pillotts. 

PEPIN, JOSEPH. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '62, at Crown Point; pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company, as Peppen. 

PERKINS, HENRY S. Ace. 21. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at 'Warrensburgh; 
private. Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; mustered out with company; also borne as Henry F. 

PERKINS, WILLIAM R. Age. 2(5. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62. at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 23, \)'S, at Post 
Hospital, Relay House. Md. 

PERO, CONSTANT. Age, 30. Enlisted, July 23, '62. at Chazy; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company, as Paro. 

PERRIGO, GEORGE W. Age. 19. Enlisted at Beekmantown; private, 
Co. A, Dee. — , '63; missing since Fair Oaks; supposed died in prison. 

PERRY, ADOLPHUS. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, March 10, Wo, at hospital, Camp 
Adirondack, Washington. 

PERRY, BENJAMIN B. Age, 30. Enlisted. July 25, '62, at Caldwell; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; absent, missing sinro Fair Oaks; supposed died 
in prison. 



2G4 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

PERRY, DAVID G. Age, 2G. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Chester; private. 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

PERRY, MERRILL. Age, 23. Enrolled, July 25, '02, at Chazv; private? 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, May 4, '64; wounded 
at Fort Harrison; second lieutenant, Co. B, Dec. 24, '64; mustered out 
with company; also borne as Morrill and Murrill. 

PERRY, SAMUEL G. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 6/62, at Westport; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died of disease, March 28, '65, at hospital, Baltimore. 

PERRY, SYLVESTER B. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 1, '62. at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, Aug. 1, '65, at 
New York City. 

PERSONS, HENRY W. Age, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Dmry's Bluff; also borne as Pearsons. 

PETTYS, ELL Age, 38. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Chester; wagoner, Co. 
D, Aug. 21, '62; returned to company as private, no date; discharged for 
disability, Dec, 1862, as Pettis. 

PHELAN, JOHN. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps in July, '63; also 
borne as Phalon. 

PHELAN, MICHAEL. Age, 17. Enlisted, July 21. '62, at Plattsburgh; 
fifer, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as 
Phalin and Phalon. 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES. Age, 29. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. B, Sept. 20, '64; absent, missing at Fair Oaks; supposed 
died in prison. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN M. Age, 40. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. • 

PHILLIPS, RASSELUS W. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Saranac; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62: discharged for disability, June 1, '65, near 
Manchester, Va. 

PHILO, JR., ISAAC. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Queensbury; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, May 1, '65; mustered out with company. 

PICKETT, JOHN. Age. 28. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. I, Feb. 
5, '64; wounded at Cold Harbor; no record subsequent to April 30, '65. 

PICKLE, SAMUEL. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Ellenburgh; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, March 29, '63, at Camp 
Adirondack, Washington. 

PIERCE, EARL. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, Aug. 6, '64, for pro- 
motion to second lieutenant, 96th Infantry. 

PIERCE, JAMES H. Age, 37. Enrolled at Plattsburgh; captain. Co. C, 
Aug. 17, '62; captured at Drury's Bluft; paroled, no date; discharged for 
disability, Feb. 9, } 6o. 

PITT, JAMES H. Age. 23. Enrolled, Aug. 2. '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. 11, Aug. 15, '62: first servant. Aug. 30. '62: second lieutenant, Co. II, 
Aug. 1, '63; captured at Drury's Bluff: paroled, Feb., '(\o; first lieutenant, 
Co. G, June 10, ^5; mustered out with company. 

PITTS, THOMAS. A^e, 41. Enlisted, July 2S, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62: deserted, April 12, '63, at Camp Adirondack, Wash- 
ington; also borne as Pitt. 



. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 205 

PLACE, GEORGE B. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 14, 1802; corporal, Aug. 30; '62; sergeant and first sergeant, no 
dates; killed in action, May 14, '64, at Proctor's Creek, Ya. ■ 

PLOOF, JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; mustered out with company. 

PLUMLY, JEREMIAH D. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Xewcomb; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to v eteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 
18, '63, at Finley Hospital, Washington. 

PORTEOUS, JAMES G. Age, 23. Enrolled, Aug. 23, '62, at Albany; 
assistant surgeon, Aug. 27, '62; mustered out, Nov. 11, '64, for promotion 
to surgeon, 46th Infantry. 

PORTER, ALBERT F. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at St. Armarid; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

POST, ALMON. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Elizabethtown; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Past. 

POTTER, FRANKLIN. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 30, "62. at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; deserted, Feb. 2S, '63, at Camp Adirondack, 
Washington. 

POTTER, GEORGE A. Age, 19. Enrolled, Aug. 7, '62. at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; sergeant, no date; commissary sergeant, 
Feb. 13, '63; quartermaster-sergeant, no date; second lieutenant, Co. A, 
Oct. IS, '64; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, Feb., '65; first lieutenant, 
Co. E, April 5, '65; mustered out with company. 

POTTER, JOHN C. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 7. '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

POTTER, LAWRENCE. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 2,- '62, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, April 12, '64, at 
Hampton Hospital, Va. 

POTTER, MANDEVILLE. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; mustered out, June 16, ^5, 
at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

POTTER, WILLIAM H. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7. '62. at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Signal Corps, Nov. 24, '63; 
discharged, June 24, '65. 

POWER, JOHN. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; absent, sick at Base Hospital, Va., at muster-out of 
company; also borne as Powers. 

PRESTON, JOHN C. Age, 42. Enrolled, Dec. 23, '64, in the field, Vir- 
ginia; assistant surgeon, Jan. 12, '65; mustered out with regiment. 

PRIESTLEY, DALHOUSIE. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 31. '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

PRIME, ASHLEY S. Age, 23. Enrolled, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, Co. 
C, Aug. 17, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant. May 21, '65; mus- 
tered out with company; also borne as Brine. 

PRIOR, MICHAEL. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Champlain; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; killed at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Pryor. 

PRITCHARD, JEFFREYS. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 12. '62. at Horieon; 
private, Co* L), Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; discharged July 13, '65, ut Elmira, X. Y.J 

also borne as J. 1>. and Kiehars. 



265 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

PROCTOR, HANNIBAL. Age, 35. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve- one 
year; private, Co. B, Sept. 5, '64; discharged, June 28, 'Go, at Portsmouth 
Grove, R. I. 

PR'UYN, CHARLES E. Age, 21. Enrolled at Albany; first lieutenant and 
adjutant, July 17, '62; major, Aug. 28, '63; "killed June 15, '64, near Peters- 
burg, Va.; prior service as first lieutenant, 96th Infantry. 

PURVEE, ALFRED S. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62,'. at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 4, '64. 

PUTMAN, LYMAN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Pern; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 30, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of company; also 
borne as Putnam. 

PUTNAM, ADAM. Age. 28. Enlisted, Aug. 10, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug 29, '62; discharged June 19, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

PUTNAM, HENRY R. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, March 27, '63; returned to ranks, 
no date; killed at Cold Harbor. 

PUTNAM, ISRAEL. „ Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private, Co. 
K, Aug. 14, '62; no further record. 

PUTNAM, JOHN. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Peru; private. Co. 
K, Aug. 30, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Putman. 

PUTNAM, JOHN S. Age. 28. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no 
date; discharged May 29, '65, at Camp Lee, Va.; also borne as John L. 

QUELCH, GEORGE E. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Beekmantown; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 
18, '63. 

RANDALL, AARON G. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Bolton; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; sergeant, March 3, '63; mustered 
out with company; also borne as Aaron J. and T. 

RANDALL, CHARLES M. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Jay; private. 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. S, '65; 
mustered out July 26, '65, at Washington. 

RANDALL, HARVEY. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Jay: private, Co. 
C, Aug. 29, '62; also borne as Harvey T.; captured at Fair Oaks and sup- 
posed died in prison. 

RANDALL, RUFUS J. Age, 20 years. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62. at Bolton; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30. '62; discharged, July 15, '65, at hospital, Albany, 
N. Y., as Rufus Randall, Jr. 

RANDALL, SELAH. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Bolton; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; died of wounds, July 25, '64. at 
hospital. 

RANDALL, SILAS. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 19. '62, at Queensbury; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 15, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

RANDALL, SYLVENUS. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private 
Co. C, Aug. 29. '62; died, Oct. 16, '62, at" Camp Wool, Relay house, Md. 

RANSOM, HENRY S. Age, 38. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain, Co. I. 
Aug. 21, '02; severely wounded, lost arm at Drury's Bluff; discharged for 
disability caused from wounds, Nov. 2, '64. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER m 207 

RANSOM, MILES E. B. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chaxy) private, 
Co. I, Aug. 21, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; sergeant, no date; wounded at 
Drury's Bluff; discharged, June 26, '65, at Plattsburgh, N. Y.; also borne 
as Ramsen. 

RATTIGAN, MICHAEL. Age. 35. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Chester: pri- 
vate, Co. D, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, May 31, '05, at Man- 
chester, Va. 

RAWSON, SIDNEY F. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 2$, '62, at Schroon: pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, June 3, '65, at Washington, D. C; 
(served mostly on detached service at corps headquarters. 
RAY, NATHANIEL F. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 22. '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, April 13. '63. at Washington. 

REAY, JAMES. Age, 45. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62. at Chazyj private, Co. 
B, Aug. 13, '62; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; died. May 29, 
'64, at Richmond; also borne as Ray. 

REDDINGTON, HENRY V. Commissioned, declined, second lieutenant, 
Aug. 7, '63. Did not serve. 

REDMpND, JAMES. Age, 26. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 25, '65. 

REED, JOSEPH. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 10. '62. at Stony Creek; private, 
Co. G. Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluft; discharged, Jan. 23, \)o, 
at David's Island, N. Y. 

REINVIELLE, THEOPHILUS. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company as 
Renoville. 

REMINGTON, ORINGE. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Horiron: 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of 
company. 

REYNOLDS, MICHAEL. Age, 20. Enrolled. July 31. '62, at Qucensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29. '62; first sergeant, April 1, 
'63; second lieutenant, May 1, '64; killed at Cold Harbor. 

REYNOLDS, MORRIS E. Ase, 27. Enlisted, Dec. 15. '63, at Essex; pri- 
vate, Co. F, Dec. 22. '63; discharged for disability, May 17, '65, at hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

REYNOLDS, WILLIAM. Age, 29. Enlisted. July 31. '62. at Schroon: pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, 
Feb. 21, '63, at Post Hospital, near Relay House, Md. 

RICE, MOSES W. Age. 37. Enlisted, Aug. 2. '62. at Crown Point; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 21, '62; corporal. Aug. 30, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
died, April 17, '64. whiie on furlough at Middlebury, Yt. 

RICH, HENRY W. Age, IS. Enlisted at North Elba, to serve one year; 
private, Co. C, Sept. 1, '64; mustered out with company, as Kick. 

RICH, ZOPHER C. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 7. '62, at North Elba; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

RICHARDS, SAMUEL T. Age, 3s. Enrolled at New York city; colonel, 
Aug. 21. '62; discharged for disability, July .S, '63. 

RICHARDSON, WATSON. Age, 20. Enlisted. Aug. 12. '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30. '62; died, March 4, '63, at Regimental Hospital, 
Camp Adirondack, Washington. 



268 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM H. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; wagoner and returned to company as private, 
no dates; mustered out with company. 

RICHES, JAMES. Age. 42. Enlisted. July 30, '62, at Crown Point: pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 10, 
'63; also borne as Ritchie. 

RICKARD, IRA. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; private, Co. I, 
Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept„26, '63; mus- 
tered out, July 6, '65, at Harrisburg, Pa., as Record. 

RICKETSON, HOWLAND. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; pri- 
vate, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Oct. 27, '64, at Base 
Hospital, Point of Rocks. Va. 

RIGGS, EDWARD. Age, 25. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; captain, Co. D, Dec. 9, '62; resigned and discharged 
for disability, Aug. 13, '63, at Gloucester Foint, Va. 

RINGER, WILLIAM. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Westport; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 16, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no date; 
discharged for disability, Sept. 1, '64. 

RIST, DELISS. Age, 39. Enlisted, July 29, '62. at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; missing at Fair Oaks; supposed captured and died in 
prison. 

RIVERS, LEVI. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Pittsburgh: private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62, discharged for disability, June 9, '63, at hospital. 

ROBAR, MOSES. Age, IS. Enlisted at Ephratah, to serve one year; pri- 
vate, Co. G, March 16, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

ROBBINS, ANSON. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '62. at Essex: private, 
Co. F. Aug. 29, '62; corporal, April 1, '63; wounded, no date; discharged 
for disability from wounds, March 29. '65, at Fort Harrison, Va. 

ROBBINS, BENAGER. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Horicon: pri- 
vate. Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company; also borne as Bena- 
jah Robbins. 

ROBBINS, SOLOMON. Age, 29. Enlisted. Aug. 12. '62, at Horicon; pri- 
vate, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in Finley Hospital, Washington, at 
muster-out of company; also borne as Robbens. 

ROBERTS, DAVID H. Age. IS. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '62, at Ticonderosa; 

private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded.no date; discharged, June 30. '65, 

at Albany, N. Y.; also borne as Daniel H. 
ROBERTS, ETHAN A. Ase, 24. Enlisted. Aug. S, '62, at Ptattsburgh; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 28, ? ^o, at hos- 
pital, Relay House. Md. 
ROBERTS, HEMAN. Age, 42. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Chazy; private, 

Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; no record subsequent to June 30, '65, as present, sick 

in hospital, Fort Monroe. 
ROBERTS, JAMES V. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Pittsburgh; 

drummer, Co. II. Aug. 30, '62; died of disease, Oct. 7, '63, at Hampton 

Hospital, Fort Monroe. 

ROBERTS, JOHN H. Age, 18. Enlisted. Dec. IS. '63, at Black Brook: 
private. Co. 1. Dec. 24, 'i)'S: absent, missing in action at Fair Oaks: re- 
ported prisoner and supposed died in prison. 

ROBERTS, RALZA R. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62. at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Nov. 21, '62, at Fort 
Ethan Allen, Va. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER - 269 

ROBERTS, RICHARD. Age, IS. Enlisted, Doc. 10. '63, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Dec. 17, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

ROBERTS, SAMUEL B. Age, 2G. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 14, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; returned to ranks, no date; 
mustered out with company. 

ROBILLARD, JOHN C. Age, 32. Enlisted, July 22, '02, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; wounded in Jane, '64; discharged, to date- 
July 17, '64. 

ROBINS, PATRICK. Age, 42. Enlisted. Julv 29, '62, at Danncmora; pri- 
vate, Co. B, Aug. 8, '62; transferred to Co. i, Aug. 29, '62; discharged fur 
disability, Oct. 28, '64, as Robbins. 

ROBINSON, NELSON W. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 28, '02, at Beekrnan- 
town; private, Co. H, July 31, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 15, '63. 

ROCK, JR., JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted at Beekmantown; private. Co. 
G, Dec. 21, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

ROCK, JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. I, Dec. 
7, '63; discharged, to date July 1, '64. 

RODEE, ALBERT C. Age, 23. Enlisted. Aug. 8, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company, as Rody; also borne as 
Rhodee. 

ROGERS, BENJAMIN V. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 20, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; first sergeant, June ) > 
'65; mustered out with company; also borne as Benjamin F. 

ROGERS, HENRY. Age, 41. Enlisted, July 22, '62, at Elizabethan, - 
private. Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Sept. 5, y (j'S, at Con- 
valescent Camp, Va. 

ROGERS, JOHN. Age, 35. Enlisted, Dec. 29, '63. at Plat tsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Dec. 31, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Rodgers. 

ROSENCRANS, FREDERICK. Commissioned, declined, first lieutenant, 
May IS, '64; did not serve. 

ROSS, ROBERT R. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 21, '02. at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Nov. 29, '02, at camp near 
Fort Ethan Allen, Ya. 

ROSS, RODNEY. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of company. 

ROUGEIA, DELFICE. Age. 21. Enlisted, Aug 9, '02. at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; deserted, Sept. 5, '02, at Baltimore, Md., as 

Rougia. 

ROURKE, JOHN W. Age, — . Enlisted in Ninth Congressional District; 
private, Co. I, Feb. 10, '04; hospital steward, May 21, '0)5; transferred to 
90th Infantry, as John X. 

RUBADOE, THEODORE. Age. 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '01, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; discharged, May 19. '05. at Albany, X. V., 
as Rabadoe; also borne as Rabadge, Rabadue, Rabaelie and Robadoe. 

RULE, JOSEPH. Ace, 24. Enlisted. Aug. 11. '0)2, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. II. Aug. 30, '02; wounded, no date; mustered out with company. 

RUNDLETT, GILES. \^, IS. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. I, Dee. 
15, '63; no record subsequent to April 30, '05; also borne as Rondelet. 



270 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

RUNDLETT, WESLEY. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug 11, '62, at Chaaj; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '02; died of fever, Dee. 19, '02, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va.; 
also borne as Rand ell. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES W. Age, 25. Enlisted. July 23. '02, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, June 3, '65, at 
hospital, Albany, N. Y. 

RUSSELL, MARCUS. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

RUSSELL, MARTIN. Age, 41. Enlisted, July 28, '02, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 18, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died, June 5, '04, at 
hospital, Fort Monroe. 

RYAN, PATRICK R. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 21. '02, at St. Armani; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; died, Aug. 13, '04, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

SANBORN. SYLVESTER. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 29. '02, at Crown Point ; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; killed at Drury's Bluff; also borne as Lantoon. 

SANDERS, DARWIN. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Schroon: private. 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as Saunders. 

SANDERS, GEORGE. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Johnsbur-h; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; died, Feb. 22, '63, at hospital; also borne 
as Saunders. 

SAKGENT, ELIAS K. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '02, at Johnsbumh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 
15, '03. 

SARGENT, HIRAM. Age. 24. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '02. at Elizabethtown: 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

SARTWELL, EDWIN. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. S, '02, at Mooers; private 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, Jan. 13, '03. 

SAUNDERS, FRANK. Age, 20. Enrolled, Sept. 22, '64, in the field in 
Virginia, to serve unexpired term of regiment; first lieutenant, Co. hi. 
Oct" 10, '04; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, Feb., '05; mustered out with 
company; also borne as Sanders. 

SAVAGE, GEORGE. Age, 41. Enlisted, July 29, '02, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, July 20, '03, at 
Eckhigton Hospital, Washington. 

SAWYER, ALEXANDER. Age, 30. . Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. 
D, Dec. 24, '03; transferred to 90th Infantry. 

SAWYER, WILLIAM H. Age, 3S. Enlisted at Moriah; private. Co. G., 
Dec. IS, '03; discharged, to date June 13, '05, at Albany, N. Y.; also borne 
as Bayers. 

SCHOOLCRAFT, WILLIAM. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 23, '02. at Si. 
Armand; private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

SCOTT, GEORGE G. A^e, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 14, '02, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 21. 02; sergeant, Aug. 30, '02; returned to ranks, no 
date; discharged for disability, May 27, '65, at Balfour Hospital, Ports- 
mouth, Ya. 

SEAMAN, HORACE. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '02, at Schroon; pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 19. '02; corporal, Aug. 30, 02: returned to rank-; ap- 
pointed wagoner and returned to company as private, no dates; [mistered 
out with company. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 271 

SEAMAN, JOSEPH R. Age, 27. Enrolled at Tlattsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. E, Aug. 19, '02; captain, Co. A, Jan. 29, 'til; wounded at Fair Oaks; 
mustered out with company; prior service, first lieutenant, Co. I, 22d 
Infantry. 

SEELEY, LEANDER. Age, 25. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. E, Sept. 2, '64; discharged, July 15, '65, at hospital, Albany, 
N. Y. 

SEGOIN, LAWRENCE. Age, 44. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at Ausable; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; corporal, May 16, '64; mustered out with 
company as Seguin. 

SERRELL, ADOLPHUS. Age, IS. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. 
H, Nov. 9, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Sorrell and 
Surrell. 

SEXTON, CHARLES C. Age. 36. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Bolton; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

SEXTON, EBENEZER M. Age, 42. Enlisted, July 25. '62, at Horicon; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; corporal and returned to ranks, no dates, 
discharged for disability, Jan. 17, '63; also borne as Sen ton. 

SEXTON, JAMES E. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Bolton; private 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, July 5, '64; supposed captured at Fort 
Harrison and died in prison. 

SEYMOUR, CHARLES. Age, 45. Enlisted, Nov. 23, '63, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Nov. 28, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

SEYMOUR, LEVI. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Sept. 10, '6'S, at General 
Hospital. 

SHANNON, JOSEPH. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 12. '62, at Black Brook- 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

SHAW, EREDERICK W. Age, 20. Enlisted. July is. '62. at Queensbury, 

'62; discharged for disability, May 16, '65. at 



private, Co. A. Aug. 29, '62; discha 
David's Island, New Y'ork Harbor. 



SHAW, HENRY. Av^e, 31. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62. at Luzerne; private; 
Co. G. Aug. 30, '62; corporal, Jan. 1, ; 65; mustered out with company. 

SHEDD, HARRISON O. Age, 31. Enlisted. July 30. '02, at Bolton; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; died, Dec. 27, 'CyS, while 

on furlough; also borne as Harris O. Shedel. 
SHEEHAN, BENJAMIN D. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dee. 14, '63, at Elizabeth- 
town: private, Co. F, Dec. 23, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred 

to 96th Infantry. 
SHEEHAN, WILLIAM H. Aire, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Elizabeth town ; 

private, Co. F, Aug. 29. '62; discharged, June IS, '65, at hospital, Fort 

Monroe; also borne as Shean ami Sheen. 
SHEENE, HORATIO N. Age, 27. Enlisted, Dee. 15, '63, at Plattsburgh; 

private, Co. C, Dec. IS, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry, as Shean; 

veteran. 
SHELDON, WILLARD. Age, 36. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one 

year; private, Co. G, Sept. 2, T>4; mustered out with company. 
SHERMAN, GEORGE W. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Horicon; 

private, Co. D, Aim. 29, '62; died of disease, Oct. 3, '64, at hospital. 
SHERMAN, GUSTUS C. Age, is. Enlisted, July 2S, '62, at Queen-bury: 

private, Co. A, Aug. 6, '62; corporal Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, April 



272 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

1, '63; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 28, '64; mustered out, 
June 22, '65, at Washington, D. C. 

SHERMAN, JAMES W. Age, 35. Enlisted, Dee. 12, '63, at Moriab; 
private, Co. D, Dec. 16, '63 ; discharged for disability, May 18, '65, at 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., as James B. 

SHERMAN, MARTIN. Age, 44. Enlisted, Julv 3, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; killed in action, July 4, '63, at South Anna 
Bridge, Va. 

SHERMAN, SAMUEL. Age, 27. Enrolled, Aug. 11, '62, at Horieon; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; corporal, same date; sergeant, no date; 
second lieutenant, Jan. 17, '63; first lieutenant, Co. K, March 12, '64; 
wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff, Va.; paroled; discharged for 
wounds, Oct. 19, '64. 

SHIPPY, JOHN S. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Qupcnsbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; sergeant, Jan. 9, '05; 
mustered out with company. 

SHORTSLEEVES, JOSEPH. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 17, '63, at Wills- 
boro; private, Co. D, Dec. 21, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred 
to 96th Infantry, 

SHUMWAY, DAVID. Age, 23. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. C, 
Dec. 17, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

SIMMONS, THOMAS. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. o, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 13, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

SIMONS, MONTZULIA. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 4. '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; absent, sick in hospital, Portsmouth, Va., 
at muster-out of company, as Simmons. 

SIMPSON, ALANSON D. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 16, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, June 9, '(>5; mustered out with 
company. 

SLATER, WARREN J. Age, 18. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. E, Feb. 6, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

SLOSSON, MYRON H. ^ Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Champlafn; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant and first sergeant, no dates; captured 
at Eair Oaks; paroled, no date; discharged for disability, May 31, '65, at 
Manchester, Va. 

SMEAD, WILSON. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Luzerne; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, March 30, '63; wounded in June, '64; dis- 
charged for disability, May 31, '65, at Manchester, Va. 

SMITH, BARNEY. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; no further record. 

SMITH, CHARLES C. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, Sept. 1, '63, at hospital, 
Hampton, Va. 

SMITH, CHARLES M. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Jay; private, 
Co. C. Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Feb. 8, Wo, at camp near Fort Ethan, 
Alien, Va. 

SMITH, COLLIS H. Age, 29. Enlisted, Jan. 4, '64. at. Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. E, Jan. 5, '64; wounded at Drury's Bluff; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, no date; discharged, Sq>t. 4, ^o, at Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 273 

SMITH, FONES. Age, 27. Enlisted. July 21, '02, at lloricon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 18, '63. 

SMITH, GARRET. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Crown Point; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, June 9, '60, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

SMITH, GEORGE. Age, 28. Enlisted, A.ug. 8, '62, at Scnroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, May 22, '65, at Norfolk, Va. 

SMITH, JR., JOHN H. Age, 35. Enrolled, Aug. 5, '62, at Chester; second 
lieutenant, Co. I). Aug. 18, '62; first lieutenant, Nov. 2-1, '62; discharged 
for disability, Jan. 16, '63; also borne as J. F. 

SMITH, NATHAN J. Age, 31. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, May 12, '68, at 
Eckington Hospital, Washington. 

SMITH, OAKLEY, H. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Willsboro; 

private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; 
died of his wounds, July 8, '64, at Richmond, Va. 

SMITH, RICHARD P. Age, 39. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain, Co. D, 
Aug. IS, '62; discharged for disability, Dec. 10, '62 

SMITH, SAMUEL. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

SMITH, SIDNEY. Age, 25. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of company. 

SMITH, STEPHEN H. Age, 24. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieutenant, 
Co. G, Aug. 21, '62; resigned, Nov. 20, '02. 

SMITH, SYLVENUS H. Age. 19. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62. at Bolton: private, 
Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, Oct. 23, '62, at Post Hospital, Relay House, Md. 

SMITH, WILBER F. Age, 19. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62. at Willsboro; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 19, '65, at hospital, Port Monroe. 

SMITH, WILLIAM. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 9, 62, at P!a Itsburgh ; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, JSept. 3, '62, at Xew York City. 

SNELL, EDWIN S. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal and returned to ranks, no date; 
absent, captured at Drury's Bluff and supposed died in prison. 

SNIPE, SHEPARD. Age, date, place of enlistment, and muster in as priwitp. 

Co. D, not stated; no record subsequent to June 26, '65, as present April .">, 

'65, at Balfour Hospital, Portsmouth. Ya. 
SNOW, ELIHU. Age, 18. Enlisted. Dec. 15, '63, at Pittsburgh; private, 

Co. K, Dec. 17, '63; principal musician, Jan. 1, '65; transferred to 90th 

Infantry. 

SOUTHARD, HENRY A. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Westport; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; discharged, July 8, '65, 
at hospital, Albany, N. Y.; also borne as Suthard. 

SPAULDING, NATHAN R. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; 
private, Co. I, Dec. 23, '63; discharged for disability, May Is, '65, a'. 

Norfolk, Ya. 

SPINKS, WILLIAM. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Saranacj private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

SPRAGUE, LEWIS. Age, 40. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at Schroon: private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; died of typhoid fever. Oct. 13. '62, at Regimental 
Hospital, Relay House. Md. 



274 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

SPRAGUE, SAMUEL R. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 18, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

SQUIRE, MILA S. Age. 19. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, April 15, '63, at Eckington 
Hospital, Washington, as Milo S. Squires. 

STACKHOUSE, CHARLES. Age, 43. Enlisted at Johnsburgh; private, 
Co. D, Feb. 13, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '65; also borne 
as Stockholm. 

STAFFORD, JABEZ F. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62. at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Jan. 6, '63, at Fort 
Ethan Allen, Ya.; subsequent service in Co. M, 6th Artillery. 

STANARD, WILLIAM W. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29. '62; died of remittent fever, March 24, '65, at 
Camp Jackson, Wilmington, N.. C. 

STANLEY, JAMES H. Age, SO. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, Sept. 3, '62, at New York City. 

STANTON, HARVEY. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, ; 62; wounded at Fort Harrison; discharged, June 
15, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe, Ya. 

STANTON, RANSOM H. Age. 31. Enlisted, Aug. 12. '62. at Warrens- 
burgh; private, Co. G. Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company; als.o 
borne as Stanley. 

ST. DENNIS, JAMES. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Pittsburgh; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 25, '63, at 

hospital, Washington. 
ST. DENNIS, JOSEPH. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Plattsburgh; 

private, Co. PI, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

STEPHENS, EDWARD. Age, 20. Enlisted, Ang. 6. '62, at Champlain; 

private, Co. I. Aug. 20, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, 

Sept. 15. 1S63, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 
STEPHENS, OLIVER. Age. 26. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Champlain; 

private, Co. 1, Aug. 20, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, no 

date; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 26, '63. 

STETSON, MARTIN V. B. Age, 23. Enrolled at Plattsburgh; second lieu- 
tenant, Co. I, Aug. 21. '62; first lieutenant, Feb. 14, '63; wounded at 
Fair Oaks; captain, Nov. 28; mustered out with company. 

STEVENS, ELIHU. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 31. '62, at Stony Creek; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died of congestion of the lungs, April 1, '63, 

at Regimental hospital, Washington. 
STEVENS, WILLIAM C. Age, 20. Pmlisted, July 31, '62. at Stony Creek; 

private. Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; discharged, Sept. 9, '63, as Stephens. 
STEVENSON, WILLIAM. Age, 36. Enlisted at Black Brook; private. Co. 

F, Dec. 17, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Stephenson. 

STEVENSON, WILLIAM H. Age, 21. Enlisted at Fort Henry second 
lieutenant. Co. F, Aug. 20, '62; as first lieutenant, Nov. 2. 63; killed at 
Drurv's Bluff. 

STICKLE, EDWARD K. Age. 27. Enlisted, Jan 24, [i^, at Kington, 
to serve one year; private. Co. H, Jan. 27, } 05; transferred to 96th In- 
fantry; also borne as Sickle. 

STICKNEY WAYNE. \ge, 20. Enlisted, July 22, '62. at Jay: private, 
Co. C Aug. 29, '62; corporal, May 21. '65; mustered out with company. 



^ i 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 275 

STOCKWELL, SAMUELS. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Jan. 12, '6-1. 

STODDARD, ADDISON. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 16, '02, at Queensbury: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; promoted corporal, no date; discharged, June 
3, '65, at Richmond. 

STONE, ALFRED. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

STONE, BARTLETT. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; mustered out with 
company. 

vSTONE, DENNIS. Age, 27. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain. Co. G, 
Aug. 21, '62; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff; paroled, Feb., '65; 
discharged, May 15, '65. 

STONE, JOHN S. Acre, 39. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; captain, Co. K. 
Aug. 21, '62; killed in action at Drury's Bluff; a Presbyterian clergyman 
when enrolled. 

STONE, WELLS E. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, April 20, '63, at Washington, D. C. 

STOVER, WILLIAM H. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of 
company. 

STRATTON, DEWITT C. Age, 19. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private. 
Co. I, Jan. 4, '04; died of typhoid fever, July 2, '64, at Eighteenth Army 
Corps Hospital. 

STRATTON, WALTER. Age, 44. Enlisted at Chazy; private. Co. G. Dec. 
19, '63; died of disease, Sept. 27, '64, at hospital, David's Island, X. Y. 

STREETER, JOEL. Age. 35. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30. '62; mustered out with company. 

STURGES, GEORGE. Age, 25. Enlisted, July 30. '62, at Johnsburah: 
private, Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, no date; 
died of disease, April 6, '65, at Annapolis, Aid.; also borne as Stearges. 

SURPRENANT, JANURIEUS. Age. IS. Enlisted. July 19. '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date: captured at Fair 
Oaks; died of diarrhea, March 25, '<or>, at Wilmington, X. C. 

SURPRISE, BENJAMIN. Age, 28. Enlisted at Plattsbunrh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. B, Aug. 31, '64; wounded at Fort Harrison, Va.; mus- 
tered out with company. 

SURRELL, JOSEPH. Age, 19. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. H, 
Feb. 10, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Sorrell. 

SURRELL, THOMAS. A ff e, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62. at Plattaburgb; 

private, Co H, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. May 22. 

'63; discharged, July 13, '65, at Elmira, X. Y.; also borne as Terrell and 

Sirrell. 
SUTHERLAND, JR., ORRIN. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Schuyler 

Falls; private, Co. II. Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Cold Plarbor; absent at 

muster-out of company; reported died of his wounds. 

SWEET, ARAM. Age, 31. Enlisted. Au^. 11, '62, at Mooers; private, 

Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 
SWEET, GEORGE I. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62. at Mooers; private. 

Co. 1, Aim. 20, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, March 1. 

'65; mustered out with company; also borne as George J. 



276 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

SWEET, WILLIAM W. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 14. '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 21, '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; absent, sick, since Oct. 27, '64, 
and at muster-out of company. 

SWINYER, DAVID C. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 26, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 
3, J 63; mustered out, July 13, '65, at Elmira, N. Y.;. also borne as Swtnyer 
and Swynier. 

TACY, PETER. Age, 19. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. A, Dec. 
2, '63; transferred to Co. A, 96th Infantry; also borne as Tacey. 

TAEGERHUBER, LEWIS. Age, 2-i. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62. at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, Sept. 20, '62, at Relay House, Md., 
as Yaegerhubei ; also borne as Tayerhuber. 

TAFFT, JOSIAH. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Ellenburgh: private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Sept. 13, '63, at Gloucester 
Point, Va. 

TAFT, LUCIOUS L. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Plattsburgh; private, 
Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with companv; also borne as Lucius N. 
Tafft, 

TANNER, EN OS. Age, 34. Enlisted, July 26, '62 at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 17, '62; no further record. 

TART, JAMES. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Essex; private, Co. F, 
Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

TART, JOHN. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 6, '62, at Chazy; private, Co. B, 
Aug. 29, '62; wounded, no date; died of his wounds, Aug. 27, '64, at Field 
Hospital. 

TART, JR., MOSES. Age, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62. at Essex; private, 
• Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, June 12, '63, at Draft Rendezvous, New 

Haven, Conn. 

TAYLOR, ALVAK B. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

TAYLOR, DANIEL. Age. 18. Enlisted, Julv 21, '62, at Plattsburgh; 
private, Co. H, July 31, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; deserted, 
April 13, '63, at Washington. 

TAYLOR, DANIEL R. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Chester; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; died of remittent fever, Sept. 16, '63, at hospital, 
Hampton, Va. 

TAYLOR, ELLAS S. Age, 18. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Kingsbury; private, 
Co. G, Dec. 21, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry; also borne as Elias L. 

TAYLOR, THOMAS H. Age, IS. Enlisted, Dec. 14, '63, at Kingsbury; 
private, Co. G, Dec. 21, '63; wounded, no date; died of his wounds, Sept. 
17, '64, at hospital. 

TAYLOR, WILLIAM S. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Luzerne; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with 
company. 

TENANT, ERI. Age, 36. Enlisted, Julv 30, '62, at Ellenburgh; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, June 9, '63, at Regimental 
Hospital, Suffolk, Va.; also borne as Erie A. Tennant. 

TENANT, WILLIAM H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 29, '62, mustered out with company. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 



2a 



TENDER, WALLACE W. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '02, at Wilmington; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with company. 

TENNEY, JOSEPH M. Age, 30. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; second lieu- 
tenant, Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; first lieutenant, July 8, "03; discharged, Jan. 
13, '64; also borne as Tinney. 

TEROUX, JOSEPH. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. II, July 31, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; sergeant, no date; 
mustered out with company as Theroux. 

TERRIER, ALEXANDER. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Ticonderoga: 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Oct. 30, '04, at 
hospital, Buffalo, N. Y. 

TERRIER, MOSES. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

TERRELL, ALONZO. Age, 22. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with company. 

TERRILL, GEORGE W. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Horicon; 

I private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; discharged for disability, March 23, '63, at 

Finley Hospital, Washington, as Tyrell. 

TERRY, GEORGE W. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June S, '65, at hospital, Eort Monrot. 

TERRY, JOHN. Age, 44. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 25, '64; discharged for disability, May 11, '65, near 
Manchester, Ya. 

TERRY, JR., JOHN. Age, 28. Enlisted at Schuyler Falls, to serve two 
years; private, Co. A, Aug. 26, '64; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

TERRY, JOSEPH. Age, 22. Enlisted at Saranac; private, Co. A, Dec. 
15, '63; wounded at Fair Oaks; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

TERRY, MICHAEL. Age, 24. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve two years: 
private, Co. A, Aug. 24, '64; discharged for disability, May 24, '65, at 
hospital, as Mitchel Terry. 

THAYER, GEORGE R. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 20, '62, at Fort Edward: 
private, Co. A. Sept. 25, '02; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged for 
disability, May 25, '65, at David's Island, New York Harbor. 

THAYER, WILLIAM W. Age, 24. Enlisted. Aug. 13, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; paroled, March 4. 
'65; discharged, June 17, '65, at Parole Camp, Annapolis, Md.; also borne 
as Thuyer. 

THEROUX, PETER. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Pittsburgh: 
private, Co. H. Aug. 30, '62; died of typhoid pneumonia, Sept. 14, '03, at 
Gloucester Point, Ya.; also borne as Tero. 

THOMAS, EDWIN C. Age, 17. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Peru: fifcr, Co. 
K, Aug. 30, '62; wounded, no date; mustered out with company. 

THOMAS, TRUMAN N. Age, 33. Enrolled, Aug. 10, '62, at Bolton; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '02; sergeant, Aug. 30. '62; second lieutenant, 
Nov. 20, '62; discharged, Nov. 20, '63; also borne as Truman 11. 

THOMPSON, LA RHETTE L. Age, IS. Enlisted. July 29. "02, at Lewis; 

private, Co. F, Aug. 29. '02; died of typhoid fever, Oct. 23, '02, at hospital, 

Relay House, Md. 
THOMPSON, WILBER. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Jay; private, 

Co. C, Aim. 29, '02; corporal, May 27, '05; mustered out with company. 



278 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

THOMPSON, WILLIAM. Age, 26. Enlisted, Doc. 21, '63, at Moriab; 
private, Co. F, Dec. 23, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

THORNTON, SERRILL. Age, 40. Enlisted, July 28. '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 
20, '65; also borne as Thompson. 

TILLOTSON, JAMES R. Age, 27. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date ; discharged for disability, 
May 22, '65, at Norfolk, Va. 

TIMMONS, THOMAS. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 23, '62, at Saranac; 
private, Co. H, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; sergeant, Aug. 18, '63; 
wounded at Drury's Bluff; first sergeant, no date; mustered out with com- 
pany. 

TITUS, COLLINS H. Age, 36. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. E, Dec. 23, '63; discharged, May 17, '65, at hospital, West Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

TORRANCE, HENRY F. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

TORRANCE, SIMEON D. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C. Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 17, '65, from Balfour Hospital, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

TORRANCE, WILLIAM H. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Moriah; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died, Dec. 3, '63, at Port Henry, X. Y., while 
on furlough; also borne as William N. 

TOWN, CHARLES C. Age, 29. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, May 6, '63; absent on detached 
service in Quartermaster's Department, L T . S. Colored Troops, at muster- 
out of company. 

TOWN, FRANKLIN E. Age, IS. Enlisted at Beekmantown; private, 
Co. C, Dec. 23, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

TRACY, JOSEPH. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 31, '62, at Pittsburgh; pri- 
vate, Co. H, Aug. 30, '62; deserted April 15, '63, at Washington; also borne 
as Tacia and Tacy. 

TREAD WAY, JOHN W. Age, 27. Enrolled, Aug. 5, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; first sergeant, Aug. 30, '62; second lieutenant, 
Co. B, June 8, '64; wounded at Fort Harrison; first lieutenant, Co. A, 
Dec. 23, "64; mustered out with company. 

TREDO, EDWARD. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; killed in skirmish, June 2, '64, 
near Cold Harbor. 

TREDO, SIMEON. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Chazy; private, Co. 
B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; mustered out with company. 

TRIPLET, JAMES. Age, date, place of enlistment, and muster in as private, 
Co. I, not stated; no record subsequent to June 26, 'C>i>. 

TRIPP, GARDNER D. Age, 39. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Schroon; pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; sergeant, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with com- 
pany. 

TRIPP, LORENZO D. Ape, 23. Enlisted. Julv 29, '62. at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '02: discharged, July 14, '65. at hospital, Albany, X. Y. 

TRIPP, MALLERY. Ace, 19. Enlisted, Ann. 7. '62, at Horicon; private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out with com- 
pany. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 279 

TRIPP, THOMAS H. Age, 34. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Stony Creek; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62: corporal, Sept, 21, '02; captured at Fair 
Oaks and supposed died in prison. 

TROMBLEE, MITCHELL. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 19, '62, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 23, '62; no further record. 

TROMBLEE, WILLIAM. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 22, '62, at Black Brook- 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

TROMBLY, EDWARD. Age, 18. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; discharged, June 9, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe; 
also borne as Tromblee. 

TROMBLY, GEORGE. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 24, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '62; transferred to Co. I, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out with 
company. 

TROMBLY, ISAAC. Age, 18. Enlisted at Chazy: private, Co. B. Nov. 
30, '63; wounded, July 1, '64, near Petersburg; discharged, May 19, '6.5, 
at Albany, X. Y.; also borne as Tromblee. 

TROMBLY, LEWIS. Age, 34. Enlisted at Saranac: private, Co. I, Dec. 
15, '63; discharged for disability, May 10, '65, at hospital, Fort Monroe. 

TUCKER, EDWARD. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '62, at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 
15, '63. 

TUCKER, JAMES. Age, IS. Enlisted. July 30, '62. at Warrensburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; captured at Fair Oaks: paroled, no date; 
died of disease, April 6, '65, at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md. 

TUNNICLIFF, JOHN R. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Saranac; 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; wounded, no date: discharged for disability 
from wounds, March 22, '65, at hospital, as TurniclifT. 

TURNER, RICHARD H. Age, 25. Enlisted. Aug. 13, '02, at Johnsburgh; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

TURNER, ROBERT. A^c, 30. Enlisted, July 18, '62, at Plattsbimih : 
private, Co. H, Aug. 26, '62; sergeant-major, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at 
Drury's Bluff ; absent, sick in hospital at muster-out of company; also 
borne as Robert W. 

TYLER, ABNER. Age, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

TYREL, OSCAR. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62. at Chester: private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; died of disease, July S, 
'64, at Washington, as Oscar Terrill. 

TYRELL, JOHN. A^e, IS. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62. at Moriah: private. 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Cold Harbor; captured in action at Fair 
Oaks; died, Jan. 28, '05, at Richmond; also borne as Fcrrell and Terrill. 

UNDERWOOD, CHARLES. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '02, at Chester; 
private. Co. D, Aug. 29, '62; sergeant, March 29, '03; mustered out with 
company as Charles C. 

VAN BUSKIRK, ALBERT. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62, at Ellenbur-rh; 
private. Co. b, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, same date; killed at Drury s Blutf. 

VANDENBURGH, GARRY. Age, 27. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, al Johns- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Aug. 30. '02: corporal, no date; discharged for 
disability, May 8, '05, at hospital; also borne as Garrett and Guy. 



28G INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

VAN TASSELL, SAMUEL. As*, 20. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '02, at Qiieonsbury 
private, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; sergeant, no date 
mustered out with company. 

VAN WAGNER, JAMES. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Queensbury 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '02; captured at Eair Oaks and supposed died ii 
prison. 

VA3R.NO, NOEL. Ago, 42. Enlisted, July 24. '02, at Plattshurgh: private 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; discharged for disability, Aug. 27, '03, at hospital 
Washington. 

VARNO, REM!. Ape. IS. Enlisted. July 21. '02, at Elattsburgh; private, Co 
H, Aug. SO, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as Remmie Varrus 

VARNO, WILLIAM. Age, 15-. Enlisted, July 21, '02, at Plattsburgh 

private. Co. II. Aug. 30, '02; wounded, no date; mustered out, July 11. 
''Co, at hospital, Albany, X. Y. 

VASSAR, PETER. Age. IS. Enlisted, July E5, '02, at Beekmantown 
private, Co. Ii, Aug. 30, '02; died, no date, at Hampton Hospital, Va. 

VASSER, FREDERICK. Age. 24. Enlisted, Aug. 5. '02, at Chazy; private. 
Co. B, Aug. 20, '02; corporal, no date; mustered out with company. 

VAUGHAN, DANIEL B. A^c. 2o. Enlisted. Aug. 11. '62, at Paranac: 
private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; corporal, no date; discharged for disability. 
Sept. 0, '03, at hospital, Albany, X. Y., as Vaughn. 

VAUGHAN, GEORGE. Age, 20. Enrolled, Aug. 7. '02, at Chamobin: 
private, Co. 1. Aug. 20, '02; corporal, Aug;. 20, '02: fir<t sergeant, no date; 
second lieutenant, Co. K, June 0. '04; mustered out with company. 

VAUGHAN, STEPHEN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 0. Y>2, at Charaplain: 
private, Co. I, Auc. 29. '02; absent, sick in Hampton Hospital, since Jan. 
21, '64, and at muster-out of company. 

VERNUM, MF.RRtTT. Ago, 20. Fnlistpcl, July 31, '02. at Wartenslvurgh: 

private, Co. (;, Aug. 30, '02; died, Eeb. 9, 'Go, at Regimental Hospital; 
also borne as Yermun and Vernam. 

WADE, HORATIO. Age, 28. Enlisted. Dec. 14. '03. at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Dec. 22. '63; wounded at Cold Harbor; transferred to 00th Infantry; 
also borne as Henry Wade and Waid. 

WAIT, JOSEPH, S. Age, 20. Enlisted. Aug. 6, '02, at Chazy; private, " 
Co. B, Aug. 20, '02; mustered out with company. 

WAKE, GEORGE. Age. IS. Enlisted, Aug. 0. '02. at Wilmington: private, 
Co. C, Aug. 20, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as George W. 

WAKEFIELD, ALFRED E. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 14. '02, at Moriah: 
private, i^o. V. Aug. 20, '02; captured at Eair Oaks; died Jan. 2S, '0.5, 
a* Richmond. 

WAKEFIELD, JR., IRA. Age, 2S. Enlisted, Aug. 0. '62, at Elizabet ntown : 

private, Co. 1 i ., Aug. 20, '02: mustered out, June 1">, '05, at hospital, For: 
Monroe. 

WALDRON, JOS1AH D. Age. IS. Enlisted. July 20, '02, at Horicon 
private, Co. I >, Aug. IS. '02; died of disease, Jan. 20, '03. 

WALLACE, ? T ? W1LI.TAM. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 1 1. '02, at Timiid, •;••.-: 
private, Co. iv. Aug. 30, '02: rorpora.l, no date: captured at Eair Oak*=; 
paroled, E-.-b. 2S, '0.">; mustered out, June 10, '05, at hospital. Annapolis, 
Md. 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 2S1 

WALSH, ROSWELL. Age. GO. Enlisted, Auk. n, '02, at Stony Creek; 
private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '02; corporal, Auk'. 30, '02; sergeant, March 30, 
03; killed at Drary's Bluff; also borne as Waleh. 

WALTON, NATHAN. Age, 10. Enlisted, Dec. 2S, '03, at. St. Armand; 
private, Co . C, Dec. 20, '63; died, Sept. 10, '04, at Beverly Greene Hospital, 
X. J.; also borne as Nathan S. 

WALTON, ORVIS E. Age, 20. Enlisted, Dec. 14, 03, at Moriah; private, 
Co. E, Dec. 10, '03; killed at Drury's Bluff. 

WARD, AMOS. Age, 28. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '02, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 20, '02; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of company. 

WARNER, EDWIN. Aee. 21. Enlisted, July 20, '02. at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

WARNER, JEFFERSON T. Age, 10. Enlisted, A\\rr. 9, '62, at Peru; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, May 10, '0 4: wounded at Fort: 
Harrison, Ya.; discharged, Sept. 12, '05, at David's Island; also borne as 
Jefferson F. and II., and Warrener. 

WARNER, TRUMAN H. Ace, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at Ellenburgh; 
private, Co. 1, Aug. 23, '02; wagoner, Aug. 20. '02; returned to company 
as private, no date; discharged for disability, March 20, '63. 

WARRINER, OLIVER. Age, 21. Enlisted, July 23, '02, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 13, '02; first sergeant, same date; deserted, Sept. 3, '02, at 
New York city. 

WASHBOND, ABEL S. Ace, 30. Enlisted, Dec. 24, '63. at North Elba; 
private, Co. A. Jan. 2, '04; discharged for disability, May 31, '05, near 
Manchester, Ya.; also borne as Washbone. 

WASHBURN, NATHAN L. Ace. 30. Enrolled at Pittsburgh; first lieu- 
tenant, Co. C, Aug. 17, '02; discharged, Feb. 7, '03; also borne as Nathan 
S. Washburne. 

WASHBURN, WILLIAM H. Ace, 10. Enlisted, Auc. 12, '02, at Johns- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

WATERMAN, ROBERT S. Ace. 30. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. FJ, Aug. 16, '02; corporal, Aug. 30, '02; returned to ranks; 
mustered out with company. 

WATERS, RICHARD S. Ace, 24. Enlisted. July 27, '62, at Horieon; 
private, Co. D, Auc. 20, '02: mustered out with company. 

WATSON, SYLVESTER. Ace, 32. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one 
year; private. Co. G, Aug. 31, '04; mustered out with company. 

WEAVER, FRANKLIN L. Ace. 31. Enlisted, Auc. 11. '02. at Warrenshareh ; 
private, Co. (4, Aug. 30, '02; died. Dec. 12, '02, at Itegimcnta! jfciospital; 
also borne as Weever. 

WEEKS, PERCIVAL V. Age, 2-1. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one 
year; private, Co. G, Sept. 1, '04; mustered out with company; also borne 
as Wicks. 

WELCH, DAVID A. Ace, 23. Enlisted, Auc. S, '62. at Mooers; private, 
• Co. I, Aug. 2'.». '02; discharged for disability, May 7, '03. at Washington. 

WELCH, EDWARD O. Ace. 19. Enlistrd, Aug. 0. '02, at Westport; 
private. ( 'o. 1-, Auc. 20, '-02; corporal, Aug. '_''.>. V>2: first sergeant, ie> date; 
captured at Fair Oaks; paroled; second lieutenant, Co. F, May 11, 05; 
absent, siek at Annapolis, Md., at muster-out of company. 



282 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

WELCH, HENRY. Age, 32. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '62, at Westport; private, 
Co. F. Aug. 29. '62; discharged for disability, Sept. 20, '63, at hospital, 
Hampton, Va. 

WELCH, MARTIN. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. S, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, 'G2; mustered out with company. 

WELCH, SAMUEL F. Age, IS. Enlisted, Sept. 21, r 64, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. F, Sept. 24, '64; mustered out with company. 

WELCH, WILLIAM. Age, 29. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Mooers; private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; absent, sick at hospital, Hampton, Va., since May 27, 
'64, and at muster-out of company. 

WELCOME, THEOPHILUS. Age. IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. I. Dec. 5, '63; deserted, July 19, '04. 

WELDEN, JTJDE. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Mooers: private, 
Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, June 13, '05, at Balfour Hospital, Ports- 
mouth, Va.; also borne as Wcldon and Wilson. 

WELLS, ANTOINE. Age, 19. Enlisted at Plattsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. E, Feb. 9, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry, June 13, '05. 

WELLS, CHARLES W. Age, 21. Enrolled. Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 19, '02; sergeant, Aug. 30, '02; first sergeant in '03; 
second lieutenant, Oct. 19, '03; first lieutenant, Co. F, June S, T 04; as 
captain, Co. C, May 22, '65; mustered out with company. 

WELLS, GEORGE. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; 
drummer, Co. A, Aug. 10, '62; principal musician, Aug. 29, '62; no further 
record. 

WELLS, GEORGE W. Age, 30. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '02, at Keene; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; mustered out, to date, June 4, '65, at Petersburg, Va. 

WELLS, ISAAC. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '02, at Pittsburgh; private, 
Co. H, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company; also borne as Wills. 

WELLS, JOHN. Age, 28. Enlisted, Julv 21, '02, at North Hudson; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; deserted, Oct. 31, '63, at hospital, Washington. 

WELLS, JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. I, Jan. 28, '65; mustered out, June 19, '65, at hospital. Fort 
Monroe. 

WELLS, LEVI. Ace, 24. Enlisted, July 25, '62, at St. Armand; private, 
Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; wounded at Fort 'Harrison; discharged for disability, 
Aug. 23, '65, at hospital, Portsmouth Grove, R. I. 

WELLS, MITCKAEL. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 2, '02, at Peru; private, 

Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; mustered out, May 19, 

'65, at Albany, X. Y. 
WELLS, SIR HENRY. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '02, at Ellenburgh; 

private, Co. B, Aug. 29, '02; died of typhoid fever, Oct. 9, '03, at Regi- 

mental'Hospital, Norfolk, Va.; also borne as Henry S. 

WELLS, WILLIAM. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 22. '02, at Black Brook- 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '02; mustered out with company. 

WEST, EENONI T. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Queensbury: pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, J:m. 12, 65, at hospital; 
also borne as Benona T. Wert. 

WEST DARWIN A. A<4e, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 14, r 62, at Essex; private, 
Co 'f Aug 29, '02; died, Oct. 31, '03, at Balfour Hospital. Portsmouth, 
Va." 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 288 

WEST, JOSEPH. Age, 45. Enlisted, Dec. 17, '63, at Wfflsboro; private, 
unassigned, Dec. 21, 'G3; no further record. 

WESTCOTT, CYRUS B. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 9, 'G2, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; died, July 23, '(54, at Base Hospital, 18th 
Army Corps. 

WESTCOTT, GEORGE. Age, 35. Enlisted, July 17, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 6, '62; died of chronic diarrhea, July 2, '63, at hospital, 
Yorktown, Va. 

WESTCOTT, GEORGE. Age, 22. Enlisted. July 17, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; no further record. 

WESTCOTT, HENRY C. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 9. '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; captured at Drury's Bluff, and supposed 
died in prison. 

WESTCOTT, THEODORE. Age, 18. Enlisted at Ticonderoga; private, 
Co. F, Dec. 30, '63; died of measles, March 1, '64, at Balfour Hospital, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

WHALLON, EUGENE W. Age, 22. Enlisted. Aug. 8, '62, at Essex; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 21, '63, at hospital, 
Washington. 

WHEEL, JOSEPH. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one year; 
private, Co. I, &ept. 19. '64; mustered out with company. 

WHIPPLE, HOLDRIDGE H. Age, 18. Enlisted, July 28, '62, at Queens- 
bury; private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

WHITE, ABRAHAM. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; died of quick consumption, March 23, '63, 
in hospital at camp near Fort Ethan Allen, Va. 

WHITE, CHARLES H. Age. 28. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, sergeant, first sergeant; wounded 
and captured at Drury's Bluff; died, June 1, '64, at Richmond. 

WHITE, ISAAC W. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 4, '62, at Beekmantown; 
private. Co. II, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, Feb. 28, '63, at 
Regimental Hospital, Relay House, Md. 

WHITE, JAMES. Age, 38. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Saranac; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, Aug. 5, '64, at Hampton Hospital, 
Va. 

WHITE, MARSHALL. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Mooers; private; 
Co. I, Aug. 21, '62; discharged for disability, Aug. 25, '62. 

WHITE, THOMAS. Age. 45. Enlisted. Dec. 12, '63, at Essex: private, 
Co. F, Dec. 22, '63; mustered out, June 28, '05, from hospital, Troy, X. Y. 

WHITE, THOMAS H. Age, 19. Enlisted, Aug. 8, '62, at Pittsburgh, 
private, Co. II. Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, May 27, Wo } at 
Finley Hospital, Washington. 

WHITMAN, GEORGE. Age, 37. Enlisted, Aug. 12. '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, Sept. 19, '04, at 
| Willett's Point, X.Y. 

WHITNEY, JOSEPH L. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aim. 11, '62, at Mooers; 
private, Co. I. Aug. 29, '62; wounded at Fort Harrison; discharged for 
disability, April 1, '05, at Hospital, Willett's Point, New York Harbor; 
also borne as Joseph S. 



284 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTEIt 

WHITNEY, SAMUEL E. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '62, at Schroon; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; musician, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with 
company. 

* WHITTLE, CHARLES. Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 13, '62, at Champlam; 

private, Co. I, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, June 19, '65, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

WICKHAM, JOSEPH. Age, 36. Enlisted, July 22, '62, at Schroon; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; wounded at Drury's Bluff; died of wounds, June 19, 
'64, at hospital, Point lookout, Md. 

WICKHAM, LAB AN H. Age, 25. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62; at Schroon; pri- 
vate, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; died of typhoid fever, Sept. 16, '63, at Hospital, 
Hampton, Ya. 

WICKHAM, WARREN S. Age, 30. Enlisted. Aug. 11, '62, at Chester; 
private, Co. D, Aug. IS, '62; sergeant. Aug. 29, '62; returned to ranks, 
March 20, '63; absent, sick in hospital, at muster-out of company; also 
borne as Warren B. 

WILCOX, ALANSON K. Age, 35. Enlisted. Aug. 1. '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

WILCOX, JR., JOB A. Age, 35. Enlisted, Aug. 21, '62, at Luzerne; pri- 
vate, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; transferred to Co. D; mustered out with 
company. 

WILCOX, SAMUEL S. A^q, 19. Enlisted, Dec. 19, '63. at Jay: private, 
Co. F, Dec. 22, '63; wounded at Cold Harbor; transferred to 96th Infantrv. 

WILCOX, WILLIAM E. Age, 26. Enlisted at Pittsburgh, to serve one 
year; mustered in as private, Co. G, Aug. 29, '64; mustered out with 
company. 

WELKINS, ALBERT. Age. 24. Enlisted, Aug:. 9, '62. at Wilmington; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

WILKINS, GEORGE. Age, 21. Enlisted. Aug. 9, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 19, '62; corporal, Aug. 30, '62; discharged for disability, 
May 25, '63, at hospital, Washington, as George K. 

WILKINS, LUTHER. Age, 25. Enlisted at Black Brook; private, Co. A, 
Dec. 24, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

WILKINS, ROBERT. Ase, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out, May 22, 'do, at Albany, N. Y. 

WILLIAMS, ASHER. Age, 24. Enlisted, Aug;. 10, '62, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, May 25, '65, at hospital. Fort 
Monroe. 

WILLIAMS, CARLISLE. Age, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 9, '62, at Keene; pri- 
vate, Co. C\ Aug. 29. '62; mustered out with company. 

WILLIAMS, DUANE. Age, 28. Enlisted, July 31. '62, at Queensburv; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out. June 16, '(}'), at Albany, X. \ . 

WILLIAMS, FREDERICK. Age, 18. Enlisted at Blaek Brook; private 

Co. 1, Dee. 24, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 
WILLIAMS, GEORGE. Age. 42. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Johnsburgh; 

private, Co. G, Aug. 30, '62; died, July 17, '64, at hospital. 

WILLIAMS, HENRY. Age, 23. Enlisted. Aug. 12, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; supposed to have been captured and died m 
orison. 



$ 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 285 

WILLIAMS, JOHN. Age, 20. Enlisted, Dec. 15, '63, at Pittsburgh; 
private, Co. E, Dec. 16, '63; wounded at Drury's Bluff; discharged. Jiay 
26, '65, at hospital, Burlington, Vt. 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Black Brook; 
private, Co. K, Aug. 19, '02; no further record. 

WILLSON, THOMAS. Age, 23. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Plattsburgb; 

private, Co. H, Aug. 12, '62; corporal, Aug. 30 ''62; sergeant, Oct, 20, '64; 
mustered out with company. 

WILSON, ALBERT. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 21, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, mustered out, June 19, 'Go, at 
hospital, Fort Monroe. 

WILSON, JR., ALLEN. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 1 1, '62, at Ausable; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, June 2, '65, at Richmond. 

WILSON, EDWARD P. Age, 21. Enrolled, Aug. 27, '63, at Fortress Mon- 
roe, Va.; second lieutenant, Co. F, Sept. IS, '63; captain, Dec. 12, '03, 
Second Colored Cavalry. 

WILSON, ELIHU B. Age, 44. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. L Dec. 

28. '63; wounded, July S, '04; discharged for disability, Dec. 14, '64. 

WILSON, HURBURT. Age, IS. Enlisted at Pittsburgh; private, Co. K, 
Nov. 2S, '63; • transferred to 90th Infantry. 

WILSON, JOHN M. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 12, '02, at St. Armand; 
private, Co. C, Aug. 29, '02; discharged for disability, Feb. S, '05, at, 
hospital, David's Island, X Y.; also borne as John W. 

WILSON, JOSEPH. Age, 33. Enlisted, Aug. 7. '62, at Elizabethtown; 
private. Co. F, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out, June 12, '05, at hospital, Fort 
Monroe. 

WILSON, LEANDER. A^e, 41. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 20. '02; musician, Aug. 29, '02; died of chronic diarrhea, 
Aug. 17, '01, at Fort Monroe; also borne as Lysander. 

WILSON, LYSANDER. Age, 22. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '02. at Chazv; private, 
Co. B. Aug. 29, '02: discharged for disability, March 28. '03, at Camp 

Adirondack, Washington. 

WILSON, MELVIN W. Age, 33. Enrolled. Oct. 0, '02, at Albany; assistant 
surgeon, Oct. 15, '02; discharged for disability, Oct. 24, '04; also borne as 
Melville W. 

WILSON, WILLIAM J. Age, IS. Enlisted at Chazy; private, Co. I, 
Jan. 4, '64: mustered out, June 10, '05, at Albany, X. Y. 

WING, EDGAR M. Age, 21 . Enrolled, Aug. S, '02, at Queensbury: private, 
Co. A. Aim. 29, '62; sergeant, no date; second lieutenant, Co. E, Jan. 

29, '64; wounded and captured at Drury's Bluff, Ya.; died at Richmond, 
Ya., same date. 

WING, GEORGE H. Age, 22. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '02, at Queensbury; pri- 
vate, Co. A, Aug. 10. '02; corporal, Aug. 29, '02; discharged, Jan. 22, 04, 
for promotion to second lieutenant, 14th Artillery. 

Y/OOD, ASHLEY. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '02, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Aug. 29, '02; wounded in June, '01; mustered out with company, 
as W oods. 

WOOD, CALVIN G. Age. 21. Enlisted, Aug. 11. '62, at Warren^bursih; 
private. Co. G, Aug. 20. '02; musician, Aug. 30, '02; returned to company 
as private, no date; mustered out with company. 









2S6 INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ROSTER 

WOOD, HENRY A. Age, IS. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Horicon: private, 
Co. D, Aug. 29, 'G2; corporal, Dec. 25, '03; mustered out with company. 

WOOD, JOSEPH. Age, 36. Enlisted, Aug. 0, '62, at Ausablcj private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out with company. 

WOOD, RICHARD. Age, 20. Enlisted, July 29, '62, at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; corporal, no date; died of typhoid fever, 
Dec. 2, '63, at Regimental Hospital, Portsmouth, Va.; also borne as Woods. 

WOOD, THEADORE. Age, 21. Enlisted, Aug. 5, '62, at Peru; private, 
Co. K, Aug. 30, "62; mustered out with company. 

WOOD, WILLIAM. Age, 25. Enlisted. Aug. 15. '62, at Ncwcomb; private, 
Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; killed, July 9, '64, in front of Petersburg. 

WOODARD, ZEPHANIAH. Age, 35. Enlisted at Moriah; private Co. F, 
Dec. 16, '63; discharged, May 22, '65, at Norfolk, Va.; also borne as 
Woodward. 

WOODLEY, GEORGE. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Chazy; private, 
Co. B, Aug. 29, '62; corporal, no date; sergeant, Dec, '61; mustered 
out with company. 

WOODRUFF, ALVIN. Age, 24. Enlisted, Dec. 21, '63, at Moriah; private, 
Co. F, Dec. 22, '63; transferred to 96th Infantry. 

WOODWARD, DAVID M. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 11, '62, at Warrens- 
burgh; private, Co. G, Aug. 20, '62; wagoner, Aug. 30, '62; mustered out 
with company, as Woodard. 

WRIGHT, CHARLES C. Age, 27. Enlisted, Aug. 7, '62, at Queensbury; 
private, Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company. 

WRIGHT, CHARLES S. Age, 19. Enlisted, July 29, '62. at Crown Point; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 30, '62; captured at Fair Oaks; died of chrome diar- 
rhea, no date, at Andersonville, Ga. 

WRIGHT, GEORGE E. Age, 23. Enlisted, Aug. 6. '62, at Westport; 
private, Co. F, Aug. 16, '62; corporal, Aug. 29, '62; died of typhoid fever, 
Nov. 1, '62, at hospital, Relay House, Md. 

WRIGHT, WATERS W. Age, 20. Enlisted. Aug. 7, '62, at Ticonderoga; 
private, Co. E, Aug. 19, '62; corporal, Aug. 3U, '62; mustered out with 
company. 

YARTAN, EMERSON. Age, 26. Enlisted. Aug. 10, '62, at Champlain; 
private, Co. I, Aug. 20, "62; discharged, May 23, '65, at New York city, 
as Yataw. 

YATAU, LUCIUS. Age, 37. Enlisted at Plattsburgh; private, Co. I, Dec. 
5, '63; wounded at Drurv's Bluff; died June, '64, at hospital, Hampton, 
Va. 

YETTO, HIRAM. Age, IS. Enlisted, July 30, '62, at Queensbury; private, 
Co. A, Aug. 29, '62; mustered out with company, as Yattaw; also borne as 
Yatto. 

YOUNGS, RICHARD. Age, 42. Enlisted at Albany; private, Co. E, 
April 7, '65; transferred to 96th Infantry. 



. 



57 48